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Green Tea Questions


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49 replies to this topic

#1 Kimo

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 03:50 PM

Just a quick question: is there any green tea that a pregnant woman can drink? It seems I can only find caffeinated teas in my markets. Thank you, Kimo (20 weeks pregnant)

#2 torakris

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 04:25 PM

Here is a list of caffeine contents of various drinks as well as a way to make green tea with very little caffeine:

http://www.japaneseg...ne.com/faq2.htm

You can buy caffeine free green teas, I have never tried them though, a quick web search brought up many sources.

You might like to try some naturally caffeine free teas like mugi-cha (barley tea).

Congratulations! :biggrin:

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#3 "T"

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Posted 25 November 2003 - 11:02 PM

There is a "green tea" that the Japanese in my community (Steveston) used to grow and drink(my grandmother included), called inchinicha. The spelling I am not sure of since I have only heard it spoken and never seen it spelled. It tastes very much like a bancha that has been roasted ever so lightly. Not as much as hojicha though. It is caffeine free. Since most people in Steveston grew it themselves I don't know if it is commercially available. Although I do know that it is grown and available in Japan.

On a side note if you are interested in purchasing organic green tea from Japan then send me a PM. There are only two(2) that's right folks two, certified organic tea gardens in Japan and one of them is sold under the name of Keiko Teas from Kagoshima in Japan. There are around 10 teas in total. Check them out at www.teaontheweb.com


As far as I know the only place in NA where you can get them. Very good quality teas as well. I have tried all of them and have been very impressed. Different from green teas from Shizuoka but certainly of equal or better quality. Not cheap but certified organic and very good quality.
slowfood/slowwine

#4 chefs13

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 09:29 AM

I have been doing a lot of reading about Chinese green tea and its health effects. Has anyone had any experience with these teas and what can you tell me about it

Edited by chefs13, 28 June 2004 - 09:29 AM.


#5 Gary Soup

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 11:11 AM

I have been doing a lot of reading about Chinese green tea and its health effects. Has anyone had any experience with these teas and what can you tell me about it

I think it's reputed (with some clinical evidence) to both help prevent cancer and to retard tumor growth in certain kinds of cancers.

All I can tell you is that I drink green tea and don't have cancer, as far as I know. Fortunately, I have no personal experience with the latter use.

Red teas, of the other hand, are reputed to lower cholesterol and be otherwise beneficial to the heart. Maybe we should all be drinking both.

#6 mrbigjas

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 11:28 AM

I drink lots of green tea all the time. Here's what I know: it cures garlic/onion breath within a half hour or so. If you happen to spill some on your desk, it will instantly dissolve the spots where your coffee spilled yesterday. It's got a little caffeine to perk you up, but not so much that you can't drink 20 cups of it a day. In short, it's everything good wrapped up in one tasty beverage. It's gotta be good for you. Oh, but it makes you pee a lot.

#7 jayt90

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 11:34 AM

Green tea is an excellent anti-oxident. I heard this for years, then it was confirmed in the N.Y. Times magazine. I guess that makes it gospel for foodies who want to indulge in something that is actually good for you.
I buy it in bulk at Bulk Barn (Japanese and Chinese) or in bags at a Korean grocer. The buds from the top of the bush are less tannic with fewer stems, making a better brew.

#8 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 02:41 PM

I don't know anything about Chinese green tea, but I do drink a quite a lot of Japanese green tea every day--two liters or more. That's simply because I like it. I sometimes drink green tea after I drink coffee. :biggrin:
Health effects of Japanese green tea:
http://www.japaneseg....com/health.htm

#9 jpr54_

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 03:33 PM

i enjoy korean teas which i purchase from www.shanshuiteas.com and www.franchia.com-
the green teas from both are excellent and you can order sample size teas-
shan shui teas has just received new spring 2004 teas-
these teas are korean-
joanne

Edited by jpr54_, 28 June 2004 - 03:34 PM.


#10 Knicke

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Posted 28 June 2004 - 03:49 PM

I can confirm the above claim that it makes a good mouth-freshener; not just onion breath, but morning breath, too!!

Other than that...all's I know is it's tasty.
Nikki Hershberger

An oyster met an oyster
And they were oysters two.
Two oysters met two oysters
And they were oysters too.
Four oysters met a pint of milk
And they were oyster stew.


#11 memesuze

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 07:15 AM

I also weigh in as a fan of green teas, but want to add a cautionary note: these are not brewed in the same manner as the usual black teas most of us encounter. You should use cooler than boiling water - anywhere from 150-165 F, and brew from 30 seconds to 1.5 minutes. Failure to follow this advice might leave you with bitter or ashtray tasting tea. But doing this will give you the opportunity to have several successive infusions from the same leaves, starting with less time for the first one, and adding 15 seconds to each successive infusion. And since green leaves are typically fluffier thatn blacks, or even oolongs, and thus weigh less per volume measure, if you have access to a gram scale, I'd suggest 3 grams per 6 ounces of water rather than the black's 2 grams per 6 ounces.

#12 chefs13

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 02:10 PM

I too enjoy green tea, however I must caution people. I purchased a box of Triple Leaf Green tea. Boy was I in for a surprise.. that 3rd leaf was senna. You think regular green tea makes you have regular bathroom visits? Well as some may already know, senna does the same thing. Green tea w/ senna doesn't help the urinary track.. its more of a helpful bowel mover. Not fun when you've drank a few cups.
I'll be sure to check the label next time before purchasing

Edited by chefs13, 29 June 2004 - 02:11 PM.


#13 Hiroyuki

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 02:50 PM

Have you checked this thread in the Japan Forum?
http://forums.egulle...topic=43533&hl=
Cooking with green tea.

#14 jayt90

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 05:27 PM

.. that 3rd leaf was senna. You think regular green tea makes you have regular bathroom visits?

Well, it shouldn't be too hard to acquire green tea without the additives!

#15 chefs13

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Posted 29 June 2004 - 08:51 PM

I have just recently started drinking green tea. Never thought about cooking with it.
Very interesting. I purchased a container of tettle green tea today. really rather good. I filled my coffee perculator 1/3 of the way with water, filled the pot with ice. Placed 3 bags in the filter and made chilled green tea. I believe I'm addicted. I like it plain. Its was refreshing to say the least

#16 BuzzRoaster

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Posted 30 June 2004 - 08:09 AM

You should use cooler than boiling water - anywhere from 150-165 F, and brew from 30 seconds to 1.5 minutes. Failure to follow this advice might leave you with bitter or ashtray tasting tea.

FWIW-Personally, I never use boiling water to make tea. I allow it to steep overnight.

I usually make a gallon at a time and get everything together the night before. When I was younger we used to call this sun tea. We would throw about 12-14 tea bags in a gallon of water along with some lemon slices and set it in the sun to brew. It was never bitter and always refreshing. :biggrin:

#17 Gary Soup

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Posted 30 June 2004 - 12:00 PM

I allow it to steep overnight.

I usually make a gallon at a time and get everything together the night before. When I was younger we used to call this sun tea.

Er, shouldn't that be Moon Tea? Or maybe you live in Barrow, Alaska.

We used to make tea with cold water in a mason jar, placing it on a window ledge so it could catch the sun's rays. It was known as "Squaw Tea."

#18 sco-v

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Posted 12 July 2004 - 04:30 PM

Oh, but it makes you pee a lot.


And how. i do on average 12-14 cups a day just at work - so yeah, i gotta make sure i hit the head before i hit the road because if traffic is moving slow i'll find my self growing gills. ;) :shock:

Edited by sco-v, 12 July 2004 - 04:31 PM.


#19 fiftydollars

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Posted 16 July 2004 - 12:31 AM

I love green tea!

I also love making green tea sorbet and it's easy if you have an ice cream maker.
Just make a double-strength brew of tea, sweeten to taste (and a little extra), cool, and freeze using your ice cream maker's instructions.

#20 dumplin

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Posted 24 July 2004 - 01:17 AM

Green tea is also full of vitamin K and acts as a natural blood thinner. I actually had to give up my green tea when I was on Coumadin because it was making my blood so thin. It wasn't on the list of foods to avoid; I just found out about its blood thinning properties by accident when reading about green tea.

I love a cuppa Japanese cherry green tea. I also love iced green tea with honey...an easy way to get all your liquids for the day! :wub:
it just makes me want to sit down and eat a bag of sugar chased down by a bag of flour.

#21 spoonbread

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Posted 24 July 2004 - 12:51 PM

Here's a nice link....

Green Tea

#22 jpr54_

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 04:31 PM

http://www.nysun.com/article/7924
joanne


Exceprt from the referenced article added below by management

Leaves of Green

BY PIA CATTON
January 19, 2005

Green tea is said to possess so many health benefits it's practically a cure-all. Its unfermented leaves - filled with antioxidants and Vitamin C - are thought to aid weight loss, ease hangovers, and even prevent cancer.



#23 cjs

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 10:49 PM

My favorite is the favorite in the article as well.........the Genmai Cha. I think its the toasted rice in it.

#24 Hiroyuki

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 11:02 PM

My favorite is the favorite in the article as well.........the Genmai Cha. I think its the toasted rice in it.

View Post

Genmai means brown rice, i.e., unmilled rice. It is toasted and mixed with green tea.

#25 MarketStEl

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Posted 19 January 2005 - 11:35 PM

Since even the major brands have jumped on the green-tea bandwagon (my local supermarkets stock Lipton, Salada, Twinings, Bigelow and Harris green teas), I would have liked to see at least one of these in their comparisons to see how they stack up.

I do not find the flavor of green tea at all objectionable. Unlike black tea, I find I do not need to add sugar to it.
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#26 jglazer75

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:34 AM

I'll throw down a second (or is it fourth or fifth by now) for the green teas. I'm not a tea person, I just gots to have my coffee in the morning. Black teas, while pleasant enough, just don't do it for me. It's not that I don't like them, but I often feel that if I'm going to drink a straight up black tea, I'll just brew the pot o' coffee or pull out the french press. On the other hand, I like to have a hot drink at night as I'm watching the Daily Show trying to ignore the rest of the day and I find green tea perfect for this non-activity.

#27 fiftydollars

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Posted 20 January 2005 - 10:55 AM

My favorite is the favorite in the article as well.........the Genmai Cha. I think its the toasted rice in it.

View Post

Genmai means brown rice, i.e., unmilled rice. It is toasted and mixed with green tea.

View Post


I love this tea!

The Republic of Tea sells this as "Tea of Inquiry" and I fell in love with my first sip.

I never knew the real name until now, but I have been drinking this for a few years. Can someone recommend a favorite I should try?

#28 waves2ya

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 09:57 AM

I can see there have a few discussions on 'green tea' (like this one) - but I can't seem to get the search tool to divine the answer to these tea q's...

Is tea like coffee in that it should be consumed within a period (?) after roasting/prepping for market? Is fresher tea (whatever that is) better for you than tea that's in bags (and boxes)?

Here's why I ask - I, like the folks on this thread advocate, have green tea during the day. I prefer Eden's Bancha (boxed & bagged tea) because it tastes best (lots of tasting went on; learned about various roasts) and the package/their other product lines gives me faith that this is a quality product.

However... I received this rather ornate box about 6 mo's ago from a friend who went to China. In it was a bag (ziploc, after digging thru more fancy packing) of 'green tea'. Really dark green tea. Prolly been in the box, like, forever. I can imagine this will taste strong. Chinatown herb shops are full of these nice boxes with somewhat strange products with undocumented authenticity & efficacy - tea aside.

Anyhow - tea pro's, green tea experts - would you drink the gift? Can you guide on q's...?

Many thanks.
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#29 jpr54_

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 10:05 AM

describe the leaves-
are they rolled into balls? are leaves short/long, wide/thin?
does tea have an aroma?

my suggestion is to try some of the tea-take 2tsp of tea and try it with 6-8 oz. of water at 190 degrees

#30 waves2ya

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 10:24 AM

describe the leaves-...

View Post


Yes. Balls. Leaves are kind of large, maybe on the wider side... Smells like common tea...

That's one of the things that got me thinking (beside gullet timeliness) as a podmate was espousing his ideas about green tea (is kind of a 'hot' topic 'round the 'cooler) and he opined that green tea, rolled into little balls can have ginseng in it (my box doesn't say anything in english) and is *really good for ya*. I dunno...

But he was describing the tea in this fancy box under my desk...
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"When you look at the face of the bear, you see the monumental indifference of nature. . . . You see a half-disguised interest in just one thing: food."

Werner Herzog; NPR interview about his documentary "Grizzly Man"...