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Buck's Fishing and Camping


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#31 bilrus

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 02:57 PM

Is that the first three star he has given out in the magazine?
Bill Russell

#32 John W.

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 03:34 PM

I think Vidalia was.
Firefly Restaurant
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#33 bilrus

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 08:31 AM

Riiiight.
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#34 JPW

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 08:45 AM

Interesting to read Sietsma'a review and then go in and read the customer reviews.

Granted it tends to be the gripers that write in, but the juxtaposition is interesting.

Edited by JPW, 12 December 2003 - 08:45 AM.

If someone writes a book about restaurants and nobody reads it, will it produce a 10 page thread?

Joe W

#35 liamdc

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Posted 12 December 2003 - 01:46 PM

Maybe they recognized him and gave him good service? :cool:
Liam

Eat it, eat it
If it's gettin' cold, reheat it
Have a big dinner, have a light snack
If you don't like it, you can't send it back
Just eat it -- Weird Al Yankovic

#36 liamdc

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 08:11 PM

A friend & I visited Buck's last evening for its $20, 3-course Sunday meal.

There were 4 appetizer choices. I had the iceburg lettuce/blue cheese/bacon salad featured in the photo accompanying the Washington Post review on Sunday. The cheese was delicious and the dish worked perfectly as a starter. My friend had the beets/sweet potato salad which was marvelously presented - I can't speak to how it tasted.

Of 3 entree choices (fish, chicken, sausage), we both had the blackened chicken breast, mainly because we both wanted red wine and didn't want sausage. (Anyone else out there been to try the fish-fry that Tom Sietsema raved about in his review? Last night, the fish was rockfish.) The chicken was tasty, very tender, with a slightly crispy outside, served over a mass of mashed potato and garnished with a leaf of romaine lettuce. We washed it down with an inexpensive French syrah/grenache blend ($19/bottle), which is also offered by the glass.

We both had what the waitress described as "chocolate birthday cake" for dessert. It was very moist chocolate cake with a fudgy top and a large dab of creme fraiche on the side. Satisfying.

The atmosphere was very cozy, even though we sat right by the front door. As others noted, the service is a bit on the slow side, but it wasn't overly so for us last night. When we arrived about 7 PM, it was full, but we were seated in under 10 miniutes once a table opened. As the evening progressed (by 8 PM), the restaurant began to employ a rather odd policy of seemingly turning away a number of customers by telling them of "an hour wait" even though it was only half to 2/3rds full. Other customers waited 30-45 minutes for a table even though many were open. I'm not sure what was going on, but I'd suggest arriving early on Sundays to avoid being turned away. That said, the bar seems like a rather relaxing place to hang out.

Overall, this is a cozy neighborhood restaurant that I'd certainly be willing to try again for its full menu or again for an affordable Sunday dinner.

Edited by liamdc, 16 December 2003 - 10:51 AM.

Liam

Eat it, eat it
If it's gettin' cold, reheat it
Have a big dinner, have a light snack
If you don't like it, you can't send it back
Just eat it -- Weird Al Yankovic

#37 cjsadler

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Posted 11 January 2004 - 09:39 PM

Went with a group to Buck's this evening. Very crowded-- we got there at 8 and waited an hour. The only three-course special now offered on Sundays is salad/fish fry/dessert; outside of that, there is the regular menu to order from. All but one of us went with the fish fry, which was seriously underwhelming: a small plate of over-salted mixed greens and a small under-seasoned fried fish filet (mahi-mahi tonight) put in a tapered bowl atop fried potato strings (it was a somewhat odd way of serving fried fish). No remoulade or anything. The chocolate cake was very rich and very good-- the highlight of the meal. The person who didn't order the fish fry had some really good venison sausage, which I tried. The portion of sausage looked just right, but the rest of us were still very hungry after only a few leaves of lettuce and and the small bit of fish. Dug the atmosphere of the place, though, and I might have to go back some time to try the mussels (not on the menu tonight), but judging from tonight, Buck's seems very hit-or-miss.

Edited by cjsadler, 11 January 2004 - 09:49 PM.

Chris Sadler

#38 hillvalley

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Posted 26 February 2004 - 07:28 PM

Don't bother. You can dine a lot better elsewhere in the city.

They are no longer offering the fish fry, but I couldn't get details if there was still the $20 3-course meal deal.

A friend tried to eat there on a Sunday a few weeks ago. For a party of 3 they were told a half hour wait. An hour and a half later they left.

I have dined there a few times in the past few weeks. The portions are tiny and not worth the money. You can do better at Ardeo, if you must eat on Upper Conn. Ave., let alone the rest of the city.

They shrimp and grits are good, but not worth the money (18.95). You only get 3 shrimp and small serving of grits. I don't eat a lot and it didn't fill me up. The pork chops were as good as my late grandmother's, which isn't saying much. The coating was sweet and the meat dry. Did I mention that every table except ours got bread? The only food standout was the cauliflower gratin, but since the menu changes daily you never know when it will appear.

Don, you're right. Jamie at the bar is great. He knows his wines, and served me a nice Spanish one. But unless you are going for a drink, he doesn't make up for the mediocre service and the okay food.

Frankly, I don't get why it received 3 stars, except for Tom is a fan of the chef's.
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

#39 liamdc

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Posted 01 March 2004 - 11:02 AM

Walked by Buck's last evening at about 7:45-8 PM. It was nearly empty. Maybe 15 diners, including people at the bar. Maybe they should think about bringing back the Sunday evening fish fry/limited menu idea.
Liam

Eat it, eat it
If it's gettin' cold, reheat it
Have a big dinner, have a light snack
If you don't like it, you can't send it back
Just eat it -- Weird Al Yankovic

#40 Steve Klc

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:43 AM

Todd Kliman has a very compellingly-written piece about Buck's, Greenwood and James Alefantis in the March 5th City Paper, which delves into two ongoing themes: the chef as artist, literally and figuratively, and the chef as business owner/manager. I'm glad to see a new willingness on the part of the CP to stretch beyond the predictable, politically-correct, free weekly view of food--you know, the "where's the best Peruvian chicken carryout?" piece. (Not that there isn't a place for that kind of piece--there is.) Todd also seems to be the right writer for the job so far--his stuff defies expectation and isn't fitting into neat little boxes.

Unfortunately, this piece is not available online yet, but then none of Todd's stuff is. Too bad more internal CP resources seem devoted to developing and promoting their Restaurant Raters--as if the Zagat review model isn't already irrelevant. But that said, it seems to me you can't hope to foster a "plugged-in community of epicures" if your food columnist is nowhere to be found on the website.
Steve Klc

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Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

#41 morela

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:49 AM

Unfortunately, this piece is not available online yet, but then none of Todd's stuff is.  \

We're on the same wavelength...

Here it is:
https://secure.washi...x=119&next.y=15
...

#42 hillvalley

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 06:54 AM

Thanks for the link.
True Heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic.
It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost,
but the urge to serve others at whatever cost. -Arthur Ashe

#43 Busboy

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 01:35 PM

Just when I get to thinking maybe I'll drop by and check her latest effort, she goes and puts me of her feed again. I at at one incarnation of her restaurant. The food very good, but simply not good enough to give my money to someone who brings this attitude into the kitchen:

"I don't cook to make people happy. I cook because I'm an artist. And food is my medium. I have no need to nurture the world. 'You're in the service industry.' I didn't get into it to serve people. I got into it because it was the least objectionable commercial enterprise I could think of."

Washington City Paper, 4/5/04
I'm on the pavement
Thinking about the government.

#44 FistFullaRoux

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 01:44 PM

And she's still going to knee deep in reservations.
Screw it. It's a Butterball.

#45 morela

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 02:34 PM

'member this:

http://forums.egulle...showtopic=22084

I mean article by Candy Sagon...
...

#46 Mark Sommelier

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Posted 05 March 2004 - 03:09 PM

And she's still going to knee deep in reservations.

They don't take reservations.
Mark

#47 mdt

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Posted 26 April 2004 - 06:13 AM

Finally got a chance to stop by Buck's for dinner on Saturday night. Got there just before 7pm and we were seated just ahead of the crowds that came shortly after.

I started dinner with chopped chicken liver that was servered on slivers of crispy toast, tasty with a slight sweet note. My friend had the mozzarella with pesto that was quite good, although I was only allowed one bite! :raz: We both had the grilled whole fish (Mediterranean rock fish as we were told by our waitress) for our entree. The fish was grilled perfectly, the skin was nicely charred and crispy and the meat moist and tender. It was served with a lemon zest, onion, and watercress garnish that was quite tasty.

They had two offerings for dessert, apple and rhubarb pie and a tin roof sundae. The tin roof sundae was homemade vanilla ice cream with warm chocolate sauce and peanuts. While the chocolate was good the ice cream was pretty bland and just offered a contrast to the warm sauce on top. I was surprised at the lack of flavor in the ice cream. The apple and rhubarb pie was really a tart and just ok and served with a scoop of the bland ice cream.
Wearing jeans to the best restaurants in town.

#48 mhberk

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Posted 26 May 2004 - 07:12 PM

I just ran across this thread and wanted to share an experience I had with Greenwood:

I had heard from several people that I should give it a try (and almost did when it was in Cleveland Park before Palena moved in). I planned to go on a Sunday, so during the day I called them up to see if they were open. I got a recording letting me know their days and hours. The recording said that they were open on Sundays, (but would be closed the Sunday, the week before for an off premise event). So I drove down from Columbia and got there 20 minutes before they were supposed to open. As opening time came around, we were joined by other restaurant goers waiting for the doors to open. The doors didn't open at the time the hours specified. We waited 35 minutes and the doors never opened! The 10 of us (or so) just went to the Thai restaurant next door.

I was so mad that I called and left a message on their recording the next day and explained what happened and asked why they weren't open. I expected an apology or some kind of explanation. All I got was a message (I think it was Mrs. Greenwood herself) telling me that I shouldn't have driven all that way without confirming that they were open and that next time, I should make sure that a restaurant is open before I tried to go there. I wouldn't have minded if she had asked me to give them another try or offered me a compementary app. But this bit! She made it seem like it was my fault!! I was so insulted!!

I finally felt vindicated when they shut down until I found out a few months ago that that "Fishing and Camping" restaurant was actually her new restaurant. I truly hope that they fail miserably!!
(Sitting for lamb chops)

Lamb: Ple-e-e-se Li-i-i-sa I thought you lo-o-o-oved me, lo-o-o-oved me
Marge: Whats Wrong Lisa? Cant get enough lamb chops?
Lisa: I can't eat this, I can't eat a poor little lamb.
Homer: Lisa get a hold yourself, that is lamb, not A lamb.

#49 Roger Troutman

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Posted 27 May 2004 - 08:27 AM

With customer service like this, I can't imagine they will be around for long. All it takes is one call to the Health Department by a disgruntled customer.
Love,

Mr. Roger Troutman, who enjoys food and beverages.


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WASHINGTON, D.C.

#50 bexdc

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 07:13 AM

I ate here a couple of months ago. It was okay, not great. The portions were a bit small for me (and I'm not a big eater). The setting was relaxing and intimate, but I would go back only if the food improved.

#51 HOOLIGAN

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 08:53 AM

I have three guiding principles that aid me through social navigation.

1) Never trust anyone who doesn't eat bacon.
2) Never trust anyone who doesn't drink booze.
3) Never trust anyone who doesn't swear.

I say on with the pottymouth. I know and like Madame Greenwood. She'll probably wear that remake as a badge on honor, that is until she kicks your motherfu..n' ass.

See You Next Tuesday Opps....................
Jarad C. Slipp, One third of ???

He was a sweet and tender hooligan and he swore that he'd never, never do it again. And of course he won't (not until the next time.) -Stephen Patrick Morrissey

#52 morela

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 09:08 AM

I finally felt vindicated when they shut down until I found out a few months ago that that "Fishing and Camping" restaurant was actually her new restaurant. I truly hope that they fail miserably!!

Praying for someone to fail is a huge waste of time...

Try driving your car through the front window next time. The glass in that window costs at least as much as your tank of gas. Please drive carfeully around the hanging canoe.
...

#53 mhberk

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 09:30 AM

I can see how some would interperate calling her that name as being extreme. I thought I was being nice! But you have to understand that I drove 45 minutes each way to go there. I waited nearly an hour outside the doors waiting for them to open. I called the restaurant earlier in the day to make sure they were open on Sundays and the recording said that they were. When I left them (a very civil) message to find out why they weren't open and to find out when I could try again, the only response I got was "next time you should find out if a restaurant is actually open before I try to go." She was talking down to me and made it seem like it was my fault that they had the wrong recording on their answering machine!
(Sitting for lamb chops)

Lamb: Ple-e-e-se Li-i-i-sa I thought you lo-o-o-oved me, lo-o-o-oved me
Marge: Whats Wrong Lisa? Cant get enough lamb chops?
Lisa: I can't eat this, I can't eat a poor little lamb.
Homer: Lisa get a hold yourself, that is lamb, not A lamb.

#54 iamthestretch

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Posted 28 May 2004 - 11:15 AM

I have three guiding principles that aid me through social navigation.

1) Never trust anyone who doesn't eat bacon.
2) Never trust anyone who doesn't drink booze.
3) Never trust anyone who doesn't swear.

OT, but I think we may have finally found the honest broker needed to settle the Arab-Israeli conflict. Suspended creme brulee for everyone who comes to the negotiating table!
"Mine goes off like a rocket." -- Tom Sietsema, Washington Post, Feb. 16.

#55 sara

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Posted 26 June 2004 - 10:24 PM

We stopped in to have a light meal at Buck's before seeing Fahrenheit 9/11 at the Avalon tonite (GO SEE THIS MOVIE IT IS AWEEEESOME!!). My first time, even tho the place is just 2 blks from the apt.

Liam and I shared two appetizers-- the fried green tomatoes and okra, and the mozzarella and beet salad. The tomatoes and okra were tempura-battered, not floured and fried the way they're done in the South, and the way I prefer them. The tempura crust was a bit sticky and got soggy too fast. Pretty missable dish except for the dressing on the side which was delish. The other app was much better--The mozzarella was incredibly fresh, moist, and sweet, and I liked the pairing with pale pink beets and pesto.

For our entree we ordered the grilled shrimp with corn and tomato salad. But alas, it was 8 pm and they were out! The bartender came over and gave us the bad news, and then strongly advocated we have the lobster instead. Only problem? No lobster on the menu we'd seen. It was a mystery where this lobster was coming from, and we still didn't know as she and the host swooped around us, pushing the lobster, putting the menu in front of us, taking it away--it all happened so fast and it was so pushed, well, we got it.
We postulated aloud that after such a show, the lobster would be provided at the same charge as the shrimp--$18. And if not, we thought, well then we'd note that and mention it here as punishment (hee hee)...

The lobster was fabulous. 1.5 lbs approx, split and grilled, covered in a yellow grape tomato, corn, and rice salad. We each had half and I sucked mine dry, dipping in with all fingers, then tackling Liam's remains. My fingers *still* smell good. :biggrin:

However, we were charged $25 for the lobster on the bill. Not cool. But we were in a hurry, decided we were partly at fault for not saying something when they were pushing us, and paid and left. Oh well. The lobstah was So Good.

As for drinks--I had a very nice, fresh and strong margarita and Liam had a glass of verdehlo(sp?). Service was friendly, excepting the lobster incident, but we sometimes had a very hard time catching the bartender's attention--especially when we wanted the check.

Overall, I like the bar area at Buck's--the red walls and artwork are very attractive. I think I'll be back...
Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.
-- William Grimes

#56 morela

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 06:00 PM

We stopped in to have a light meal at Buck's before seeing Fahrenheit 9/11 at the Avalon tonite (GO SEE THIS MOVIE IT IS AWEEEESOME!!). My first time, even tho the place is just 2 blks from the apt.

I think I'll be back...

I like Bucks alot, I do, but I think Mr. Moore would have urged you to Ray's the Steaks tonight; he's that kinda guy. Mmmm. My tummy is happy-full, and I'm as drunk as HomerS with a Bible. So, was F-911 just funny or are your as sick of Bush?
...

#57 sara

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Posted 27 June 2004 - 09:09 PM

I don't think Moore probably believes in spending much money on food, actually...

That said, I definitely gotta get to Ray's!

The movie really wasn't funny at all-sure it had a few lite moments, but really it makes you sad/mad/scared and tearful more than anything else.
Food is a convenient way for ordinary people to experience extraordinary pleasure, to live it up a bit.
-- William Grimes

#58 JennyUptown

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 11:43 AM

Has anyone been to Buck's this winter? I'm curious to know what kind of seasonal offerings Ms. Greenwood has featured because I am considering having dinner there tonight.

The restaurant doesn't have a web site as far as I can tell.

#59 JennyUptown

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Posted 09 January 2005 - 06:47 PM

Given that none of ya'll were any help, I had to go and do my own research. :raz:

What we ate (working from memory here):

Iceberg lettuce with applewood smoked bacon, bleu cheese
My friend had this. I don't eat lettuce (really) so I only tasted the bacon (awesome) and bleu cheese (awesome squared). She is usually a "dressing on the side" kind of gal so I was impressed with the gusto with which she attacked this chunk of salad, thick with gooey bleu cheese.

Handmade mozzarella, crispy fennel, roasted butternut squash, signature pesto
This was one of the meal's highlights for me. In spite of my comment re: the ubiquity of butternut squash soup, it really is something I like. A lot actually. These little buttery cubes tasted great with Buck's firm, handmade mozzarella, and the homemade pesto is something else. They should put the stuff in jars and sell it, I'd love it on toast. I was trying to guess at the pesto's many ingredients - it wasn't traditional to say the least - but beyond beets, garlic...I stopped analyzing and just enjoyed.

Dry-aged Prime Sirloin with frites
Served medium, as ordered, this was a flavorful, juicy piece of beef. Both the sirloin and the fries had a nice kick of salt that was missing from my own entree (see below). The frites were light and slightly crisp with little to no grease.

Crispy pork chop, bibb lettuce and lime salad
Even though I knew the lettuce would be wasted on me, I really wanted the pork. It wasn't quite what I expected, arriving with a rather thick layer of breading. That would have been ok had the coating had more flavor. I kept reaching for the salt, but even that couldn't awaken much taste, a shame in that the pork itself was tender and cooked to a perfect (IMO) level of doneness.

Side of hush puppies
I saw these on the menu, served with a duck dish and asked if we might have them as a separate side dish (no way was I going to suggest any substitutions :biggrin: ). Our very pleasant server was happy to oblige. My first one was great, but as they cooled rapidly, the flavors somehow slipped away. They were fine, but I wouldn't suggest them as an add on for future meals (we received about 10 small hush puppies for $5).

Green apple-cranberry cobbler with fresh whipped cream
So good. Loved it. The clusters of cobbler topping were buttery perfection. The only thing that would have made it better? Serving the dish warm instead of room temperature.

Chocolate Texas sheet (identified as sheath on the menu - typo, right?) cake
Also with fresh whipped cream, also great in my book. My friend liked the frosting but thought the cake was boring. For me, this cake inspired memories of my first waitressing job when I got in trouble for having cake a la mode. I was told that I was entitled to one dessert per shift and the manager of the old lady department store restaurant snarkily told me that cake and ice cream counted as two. Hmpf. Bottom line: I liked the dense, fudgey cake.

Total damage including the food described above, tax and tip (no drinks - we were both still feeling the effects of Friday and Saturday nights): $112.

The decor
How could I skip covering that after dining in a restaurant with such an intriguing name? In a word: cozy. In another word or two: attractively rustic. Deep reddish walls, golden domed light fixtures, a long wooden communal table running down the center of the dining room...very warm in an upscale lodge-like way.

The service
I expected Buck's to be more crowded after reading about waits, particularly on Sunday nights. Buck's should be a hot neighborhood spot in a 'hood that's practically begging for good food, but tonight it was only 50-70% at various points during the two hours (+/-) we were there. As a result, our service was quite attentive; we seemed to have two servers watching over us throughout the meal, both pleasantly friendly and informed about the menu. Water glasses were filled and refilled promptly; empty dishes disappeared equally promptly.

I almost asked for a meal substitution, just to see how it would be handled, but our meal overall was so pleasant, I thought "why mess with success?" Maybe next time...

Edited by JennyUptown, 09 January 2005 - 06:56 PM.


#60 gear02

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Posted 16 February 2005 - 10:01 AM

I went to Buck's with my cousin over the weekend. We got there atound 7 and it was crowded, so we decided to eat at the bar. Just 15 minutes later the bar was packed and many, many people were there. Eating at the bar was a bit odd for me since I've never done it, but the two bartenders were very attentive (I think more so than waiters) and were very nice and friendly.

The food was a little disappointing though. We both had the wild mushroom soup, which took a while to come out. When we got it, it had a HUGE wine taste that covered anything else in the bowl. It tasted like they either rushed the soup out or just didn't cook down the alcohol a little.

My cousin had the shrimp stew which tasted very nice. It was light and savory. I had the steak as the poster above me had, but i found mine to be really salty. Almost too salty to enjoy. The saving point was that the fries were not salty and the combination was heavenly, but i didn't have enough fries.

All in all, it was a bit disappointing.