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A Vegetarian Thanksgiving Dinner

Vegetarian

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71 replies to this topic

#61 Lisa Shock

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 11:50 AM

I am a vegetarian. I usually just skip serving any sort of meat analog stuff, since it's not all that great. (I really, really hate Tofurkey.) There are literally hundreds of things you could serve for this meal which is essentially a harvest celebration. HERE'S this year's suggestions form The Well, with a link to over 600 recipes.

 

If you feel like you need a main dish, the stuffed pumpkin is big enough to qualify.

 

I feel that cranberries are essential, I prefer the fresh/raw relish type made with orange juice.

 

I also serve some sort of dressing/stuffing but, sometimes I do wild rice, sometimes I do blue cornbread with green chiles. If I do the the wild rice one, I sometimes serve stuffed mushrooms as a starter; they are stuffed with a bread-based stuffing with chopped granny smith apples and nuts.


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#62 Andrew

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:39 PM

Why not do a nut roast with a cranberry sauce, not sure how available the ingredients would be in India. Here's one version

http://www.bbc.co.uk...ndseedloaf_8883

 

Andrew


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#63 annabelle

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 02:46 PM

I believe Bon Appetit and Fine Cooking magazines both have meatless Thanksgiving meals up on their websites.


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#64 heidih

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 03:01 PM

I was thinking of preparing a thanksgiving dinner this year - completely vegetarian, eggs ok. I'm in India, so no access to fake/soy turkeys. Any ideas?


To back up - are the people you are cooking for familiar with traditional US Thanksgiving meals and want to experience it in some way or is this a theme you have chosen? The difference to me would be whether there are expectations of certain flavors or if you just want to present a unique meal that riffs on Thanksgiving.
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#65 foodphotography.in

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:27 PM

 

I was thinking of preparing a thanksgiving dinner this year - completely vegetarian, eggs ok. I'm in India, so no access to fake/soy turkeys. Any ideas?


To back up - are the people you are cooking for familiar with traditional US Thanksgiving meals and want to experience it in some way or is this a theme you have chosen? The difference to me would be whether there are expectations of certain flavors or if you just want to present a unique meal that riffs on Thanksgiving.

 

Thanks Heidi - I have both people familiar (US Consulate) and people unfamiliar (locals) at my dinner :-) I'm inclined to go with the Roasted Stuffed Pumpkin, I feel it somehow aligns a bit with the 'stuffed' part whilst staying away from mock meat.



#66 foodphotography.in

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:27 PM

Roasted Stuffed Pumpkin or winter squash.

 

I made it 29 years ago and a few times since....inspired by this article in Mother Earth News.

Thank you DiggingDogFarm - I am going to make this!



#67 foodphotography.in

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 09:29 PM

It depends on what you want. Are you trying to make something that sort of replicates traditional Tday? Or just a very good Fall dinner? Every vegan/vegetarian has to deal with these issues, and you'll find more than you could read by searching.

Since you don't have access to soy fake turkey, you might consider seitan. You can make your own from wheat flour or vital wheat gluten. I suck at making it, but I have had awesome seitan at some vegan restaurants.

http://www.theppk.co...akes-and-leeks/

Thanks Ttogull. I personally enjoy the taste of Seitan, but strangely never thought of making it! - It always felt too 'machine made/processed' I am not doing it for thanksgiving, but will definitely try it out later.



#68 Mjx

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 12:01 AM

Why not do a nut roast with a cranberry sauce, not sure how available the ingredients would be in India. Here's one version

http://www.bbc.co.uk...ndseedloaf_8883

 

Andrew

 

This particular nut roast may well be delicious, but growing up in a vegetarian family, some iteration of this has been the Thanksgiving centrepiece every year, and they've never been even close good; in fact, I'd describe the texture, scent, and appearance of every single one I've been coerced me into eating as being the exact opposite of festive.

If something like this is being considered, a trial run is a must, in my opinion.


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#69 Lisa Shock

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Posted 21 November 2013 - 01:30 AM

 

Why not do a nut roast with a cranberry sauce, not sure how available the ingredients would be in India. Here's one version

http://www.bbc.co.uk...ndseedloaf_8883

 

Andrew

 

This particular nut roast may well be delicious, but growing up in a vegetarian family, some iteration of this has been the Thanksgiving centrepiece every year, and they've never been even close good; in fact, I'd describe the texture, scent, and appearance of every single one I've been coerced me into eating as being the exact opposite of festive.

If something like this is being considered, a trial run is a must, in my opinion.

 

 

I became vegetarian in 1979 and have eaten a lot of group meals with vegetarians and have also never had a good nut roast. I'd really rather just have a series of decent sides than something posing as a main dish.


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#70 DTBarton

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 08:07 AM

As an omnivore, it seems to me that Thanksgiving is a great concept to go vegetarian.  Lots of boldly flavored vegetable options.  I'm also glad to see that you're eschewing fake turkey.  It's always puzzled me why some vegetarians seem fixated on veggie dishes made to look like meat (turkey, burgers, hot dogs, etc.)

 

If I were doing a vegetarian Thanksgiving, I think I'd make a big lasagna as the centerpiece.  Wild mushroom, bechamel sauce, ricotta cheese and a stuffing layer to make it authentic, just use vegetable stock for the stuffing.


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#71 Katie Meadow

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Posted 22 November 2013 - 09:32 AM

For almost thirty years I've been familiar with vegetarians at Thanksgiving, since there have been times when exactly 3 out of 12 people at my in-laws' table have eaten the turkey, which I cook every year. The stuffing has always been vegetarian, and split between cooked inside the bird and cooked in a casserole dish. The dressing/stuffing is chestnut and corn-white bread, using a bit of apple and the usual suspects with fresh thyme and sage, adding vegetable broth to moisten the dressing that cooks outside the turkey. Someone always makes a vegetarian entree, that might range from enchiladas to lasagna to spanakopita. This year my SIL is making the recent NYT veg recipe for portobellos stuffed with nuts and rice and lentils. There are always mashed potatoes, yams, vegetable sides and a green salad and a fresh cranberry-orange salad. A popular side has always been that standard southern casserole, Spinach Madeleine. I would be thrilled by a dinner with an Indian twist, but if your guests are looking for something with that New England vibe, I would think that basic ingredients are easily available to you where you are. If fresh cranberries are not available, I would go with whatever refreshing tart fruits are to be found. Various chutneys could be a great accompaniment to any traditional thanksgiving.

 

And I agree with anyone above who is against faux meat. No tofurkey, please.


Edited by Katie Meadow, 22 November 2013 - 09:33 AM.

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#72 foodphotography.in

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Posted 24 November 2013 - 11:57 PM

As an omnivore, it seems to me that Thanksgiving is a great concept to go vegetarian.  Lots of boldly flavored vegetable options.  I'm also glad to see that you're eschewing fake turkey.  It's always puzzled me why some vegetarians seem fixated on veggie dishes made to look like meat (turkey, burgers, hot dogs, etc.)

 

If I were doing a vegetarian Thanksgiving, I think I'd make a big lasagna as the centerpiece.  Wild mushroom, bechamel sauce, ricotta cheese and a stuffing layer to make it authentic, just use vegetable stock for the stuffing.

 

 

For almost thirty years I've been familiar with vegetarians at Thanksgiving, since there have been times when exactly 3 out of 12 people at my in-laws' table have eaten the turkey, which I cook every year. The stuffing has always been vegetarian, and split between cooked inside the bird and cooked in a casserole dish. The dressing/stuffing is chestnut and corn-white bread, using a bit of apple and the usual suspects with fresh thyme and sage, adding vegetable broth to moisten the dressing that cooks outside the turkey. Someone always makes a vegetarian entree, that might range from enchiladas to lasagna to spanakopita. This year my SIL is making the recent NYT veg recipe for portobellos stuffed with nuts and rice and lentils. There are always mashed potatoes, yams, vegetable sides and a green salad and a fresh cranberry-orange salad. A popular side has always been that standard southern casserole, Spinach Madeleine. I would be thrilled by a dinner with an Indian twist, but if your guests are looking for something with that New England vibe, I would think that basic ingredients are easily available to you where you are. If fresh cranberries are not available, I would go with whatever refreshing tart fruits are to be found. Various chutneys could be a great accompaniment to any traditional thanksgiving.

 

And I agree with anyone above who is against faux meat. No tofurkey, please.

 

:-) Thanks Katie and DTBarton. Faux meat is well, just not happening... 

Yes we are looking for the New England vibe and will go with the stuffed roasted pumpkin







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