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A Vegetarian Thanksgiving Dinner

Vegetarian

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71 replies to this topic

#31 Stone

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 08:01 AM

I would think that there are some South Asian dishes that share "Thanksgiving" spicing.

#32 estherschindler

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:40 AM

another pie.  It's on the table at a different time anyway, and it's beautiful and tasty.  the leek tart is good, but I love the butternut squash gallette from her "Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone."  just add lots of blue cheese and ginger, which isn't in the recipe but makes it into a magical dish.

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That gallette has the right sound to it -- I'm afraid the leek-mustard tart (wonderful as it is) would be too creamy. (In previous years, we've added up the butter in the meal... and usually hit 4 or 5 pounds of it.) I'm off to the library to check out that book *again.*

#33 estherschindler

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:42 AM

I make a pie for Christmas every year that would also be good for Thanksgiving.  It has pearl onions, pears, carrots, and chestnuts in a cider gravy.  The pears and carrots are left pretty big.  I bake it in a deep pie pan, and it has an herby crust on the top only.  It doesn't really seem like too much pie, even though there's pumpkin and apple pie afterwards.

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That sounds great. Recipe, recipe!

#34 Jason Perlow

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:47 AM

How about felafel sandwiches, but with stuffing, mashed potatoes, gravy and cranberry sauce stuffed into a pita instead of the traditional israeli condiments?

Although there is the problem of the gravy and the stuffing. Maybe a mushroom gravy or stuffing made with a vegetable stock instead of poultry stock?

I'm drawing a blank here.

Hey, what about a fresh pasta or risotto made with Pumpkin or Squash? Like a Squash/Pumpkin Gnocchi with parmesan/butter?
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#35 slbunge

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 09:52 AM

We have cooked 'Corn Squash and Rice Loaf' from Nava Atlas' Vegetarian Celebrations cookbook. As I type it I realize that it tastes and looks far better than the name sounds. Essentially it is served unmoulded from a loaf pan and it should be bound well enough to slice. Quite tasty.
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#36 Lexica

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 10:19 AM

A pilaf of some sort served in a hollowed-out pumpkin or squash is tasty and attractive, and it's flexible enough to be adapted to fit whatever else you're serving.

[edited to add:]
Found a couple of recipes on the Vegetarian Times website. I think I made the quinoa-and-wild-rice-stuffed squash one year - if I'm remembering the right recipe, it was a hit with the omnivores and vegetarians alike. There's also a recipe for delicata squash stuffed with curried wild rice and one for stuffed Thanksgiving pumpkins.

Edited by Lexica, 02 November 2004 - 10:56 AM.

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#37 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 10:26 AM

A pilaf of some sort served in a hollowed-out pumpkin or squash is tasty and attractive, and it's flexible enough to be adapted to fit whatever else you're serving.

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perhaps this one will do perfectly??click here :wink:

a spectacular looking recipe that makes a wonderful main course for a Vegetarian Thanksgiving (or a Thanksgiving side dish). You can use a larger (as in 5 or 6 lb.) pumpkin to feed a family, or stuff small individual pumpkins for each person.


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#38 Ling

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 12:39 PM

maybe homemade ravioli?

#39 Ling

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 12:40 PM

this sounds good..fits the thanksgiving theme too

sweet potato ravioli with sage butter sauce: http://www.epicuriou...ws/views/104709

#40 Behemoth

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 12:41 PM

I did glazed onions stuffed with a lentil goat cheese salad one year when I was veg, that went over very well.

#41 beccaboo

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 05:26 PM

I make a pie for Christmas every year that would also be good for Thanksgiving.  It has pearl onions, pears, carrots, and chestnuts in a cider gravy.  The pears and carrots are left pretty big.  I bake it in a deep pie pan, and it has an herby crust on the top only.  It doesn't really seem like too much pie, even though there's pumpkin and apple pie afterwards.

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That sounds great. Recipe, recipe!

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Christmas Pie

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 tablespoons olive oil
500 grams pearl onions -- peeled
1 sprig thyme
1 bay leaf
4 stalks celery -- cut into 6 cm lengths
6 small pears -- such as seckel pears, peeled, cored, and quartered
2 cloves garlic -- crushed
500 milliliters vegetable broth
330 milliliters strong cider
3 sprigs sage -- leaves roughly chopped
125 grams prunes
350 grams self-raising flour
175 grams vegetable suet -- (or use 100 g vegetable shortening if you can't find vegetable suet)
1/2 teaspoon salt
225 milliliters water
3 tablespoons minced parsley
2 tablespoons cornstarch -- mixed with 1 tablespoon water
250 grams cooked chestnuts -- (canned or vacuum-packed)
salt and pepper
2 egg yolks -- beaten, or water and soya milk if you want this to be vegan
fresh bay leaves and cranberries -- for decoration

Heat the oven to 350F.

Heat the oil in a big, deep pan and fry the onions, thyme, and bay leaf till the onions are golden-brown. Add the celery, carrots, garlic, pears, broth, and cider. Bring to a boil, cover, and simmer for 15 minutes. Add the sage and prunes and cook for another 5 minutes.

Mix the flour with the 1/2 teaspoon salt, parsley, and suet (if using shortening, rub it in). Mix in enough of the water to make a soft-but-not-sticky dough.

Roll 2/3 of the dough out into an shape 5 cm bigger than your pie dish (I use an old semi-rectangular Le Creuset dish that's about 18x28cm, and this recipe just fits). Using your dish as a guide, cut out first a piece of dough the shape of the dish's top, then a second piece around the outside that's a strip about 2.5cm wide.

Mix the cornstarch slurry into your pear mixture, bring to a boil, and cook till thickened. Add salt and pepper to taste and pour into the pie dish, picking out the thyme sprig. Scatter the chestnuts artfully over the top. Dampen the rim of the dish and stick the strips of pastry to it. Brush with some of the egg yolk (or water) and affix the dish-shaped piece of dough, pressing it to make sure it's stuck. Brush with more egg yolk.

Roll the rest of the dough out into a rectangle and cut into six little strips and six long ones. Arrange the little strips on top of the pie to make a decorative lattice, and use the long ones to make two long plaits to stick around the edge of the pie. Brush with egg yolk (or soya milk) and bake for 40 minutes.

Garnish with bay leaves and cranberries.

Source:
"Adapted from BBC Vegetarian, December 1998"


NOTES : You can make the up the day before and keep it in the fridge till you're ready to bake it. It'll take a little longer to cook that way, though.

#42 intraining

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 05:40 PM

how about a nice thick sage and onion stuffing, with some kind of legumes for extra 'weight', maybe even to tight mashed potatoes?? should go along with the theme. cook separately :raz:

fakin bacon? is that still around? :blink:

#43 NulloModo

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Posted 02 November 2004 - 06:51 PM

What type of vegitarian? Will they eat cheese/eggs/etc?
He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

#44 Moopheus

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Posted 03 November 2004 - 05:31 AM

maybe homemade ravioli?

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I was thinking of doing that this year (being the veg that comes to dinner); but our family dinner usually includes ravioli in any case. A couple of years ago I made an eggplant parmesan (recipe from Deborah Madison's Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone) that went over well--my aunt's mother-in-law also brought one but mine was the one that got eaten.
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#45 daniellewiley

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Posted 03 November 2004 - 06:22 AM

Have you asked Leo? My sister-in-law and Thanksgiving cooking partner is vegetarian, but she absolutely does not want any special entree. She is so enamored of all of the side dishes that she wants nothing else.
In addition to our bbq'd turkey, we serve:
cranberries (from Cook's Illustrated)
cranberry horseradish relish
creamed corn made with Cope's dried corn
mashed potatoes
mashed sweet potatoes
green beans with roasted onions in a balsamic glaze
roasted brussels sprouts
turkey stuffing
vegetarian stuffing
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a.k.a. Foodmomiac

#46 ludja

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Posted 03 November 2004 - 10:00 AM

I did glazed onions stuffed with a lentil goat cheese salad one year when I was veg, that went over very well.

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Good idea; I have to remember this. Sounds like a nice way of having a discrete item that can be served as an entree--also fits well with the abundance of carbs already on the menu. Plus, it sounds good tasting!
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#47 ruthcooks

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Posted 03 November 2004 - 10:14 PM

When I had a vegetarian at my first restaurant, where the menu was set, I would make an individual quiche/souffle/flan sort of thing in a ramekin. Seemed to go well with almost any menu I was serving that night.

The "meatiest" offering I can think of would be a stuffed Portobello mushroom.
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#48 adoxograph

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 07:44 AM

Lots of good ideas here, but I'll add another anyway. You could also do a savory strudel - mushroom, roasted red pepper, maybe some kale or goat cheese.
--adoxograph

#49 Mabelline

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 07:53 AM

Seeing as how you're in Scottsdale, and Thanksgiving=Native American= how about a tamale pie ? They are good and you will surely find vegetarian tamale pies in N.A. recipes at your library.

#50 estherschindler

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 09:19 AM

Have you asked Leo? My sister-in-law and Thanksgiving cooking partner is vegetarian, but she absolutely does not want any special entree. She is so enamored of all of the side dishes that she wants nothing else.

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We did ask Leo... in particular, we asked Leo if there was any dish that "it wouldn't be Thanksgiving without." Apparently there isn't. In answer to someone else's question, he does eat cheese and eggs; in fact, he'll eat fish if he's in a restaurant with paltry veg options.

Despite the delicious list of ravioli and lasagne dishes here, I want to add something with protein to the menu. God knows we have enough starch, with two kinds of potato and two dressings.

At the library yesterday, I picked up a copy of the above-recommended Deborah Madison book (thanks again for the suggestion!). Although the squash gallette does sound good, we're leaning towards another recipe we found therein, with walnuts, brussel sprouts, baby red onions, and fennel. The walnuts add protein, and it's more veggies on the table. (I'd probably cancel the glazed onions in that case.)

On the other hand, that chestnut Christmas pie sounds awfully good, too. Knowing our idea of compromise, we'll probably end up making BOTH. (All this for five people...)

#51 fatmat

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 10:32 AM

Deadly nightshade - It is high time the world was rid of this insidious plague!!!

#52 Fritz Brenner

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 11:44 AM

Savory crèpes would be a good dish, sort of main-dishy for the veg. but good for everyone. You could do wild mushroom and goat cheese?



:smile:
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#53 NulloModo

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 12:25 PM

Make them all. You can never have too much on the table at Thanksgiving. This Thanksgiving with my family and our old neighbors there will be an assortment of traditional, low-carb, and Brazillian dishes aboumding.
He don't mix meat and dairy,
He don't eat humble pie,
So sing a miserere
And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

#54 bergerka

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 02:50 PM

I know, I know, you said you already had enough starch...and I admit I haven't actually TRIED this recipe...but it looks so damned good I can't resist posting it for you. I plan to try it at Christmas with my family in AZ. It's from Consuming Passions: A Food-Obsessed Life by Michael Lee West (the source of my sig quote).

Cousin Lula's Sweet Potato Soufflé

2 cups cooked, mashed sweet potatoes
1 cup granulated sugar (I will leave out this ingredient when I make it, as Dad is diabetic)
2 eggs, beaten
1 stick unsalted butter, melted
1/2 cup evaporated milk
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Whisk all the ingredients together and pour into a greased 2-quart baking dish. Bake 20 minutes. Remove from the oven and add the topping.

Topping:

1 stick unsalted butter
1 cup brown sugar
1 cup crushed cornflakes (!)
1/2 cup chopped pecans
10 pecan halves

Melt the butter, add the sugar and cornflakes. Stir. Spoon over the potato mixture. Sprinkle on the chopped pecans and dot with the pecan halves. Return to the oven and bake ten minutes longer.

...I would guess you could top this with pralined pecans and it would be just as good, if not better...

K
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#55 stovetop

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Posted 20 November 2004 - 03:03 PM

Deadly nightshade - It is high time the world was rid of this insidious plague!!!


I think you need to take some Valium.


Any way back to a nice Thanksgiving dinner
Make a variety of vegetables and carbs that everyone will enjoy.
You are having stuffing right; make a nice wild mushroom stuffing
second have a steamed veg like brocoli, cauliflower, carrot ...
have a roasted squash of some kind, maple syrup, nutmeg, ginger or gralic
Have a roasted mash like turnip, or yams or sweet potato
Have a roasted medely of veg, like cauliflower, carrot, yam...
do any number of lentil or bean dishes
Make a veg lagsagna with all night shade veg potato, tomato, peppers, ect :wacko:
steve

Edited by stovetop, 20 November 2004 - 03:04 PM.

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#56 foodphotography.in

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 08:27 AM

I was thinking of preparing a thanksgiving dinner this year - completely vegetarian, eggs ok. I'm in India, so no access to fake/soy turkeys. Any ideas?



#57 Ttogull

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:18 AM

It depends on what you want. Are you trying to make something that sort of replicates traditional Tday? Or just a very good Fall dinner? Every vegan/vegetarian has to deal with these issues, and you'll find more than you could read by searching.

Since you don't have access to soy fake turkey, you might consider seitan. You can make your own from wheat flour or vital wheat gluten. I suck at making it, but I have had awesome seitan at some vegan restaurants.

http://www.theppk.co...akes-and-leeks/

Edited by Ttogull, 20 November 2013 - 10:19 AM.

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#58 FeChef

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:31 AM

Tofurky?



#59 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 10:41 AM

Roasted Stuffed Pumpkin or winter squash.

 

I made it 29 years ago and a few times since....inspired by this article in Mother Earth News.


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#60 heidih

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Posted 20 November 2013 - 11:41 AM

Roasted Stuffed Pumpkin or winter squash.

 

I made it 29 years ago and a few times since....inspired by this article in Mother Earth News.

 

I jumped there as well when I read this. Yesterday I sampled this new product at Trader Joes http://www.traderjoe...article_id=1347

 

The concept is a baked half acorn squash, filled with traditional turkey pot pie ingredients, topped with puff pastry. Everyone get their own "pie". Smoked tofu cubes or lentils in lieu of turkey perhaps? Since you are in India I think having a tamarind and a cilantro chutney alongside would rally give you great varied flavor bursts. 


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