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Venison


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#181 teagal

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Posted 27 November 2007 - 07:26 PM

This year, our (ok-my husband's ) deer was butchered by us (ok-I just mark the baggies and fill them). After all the loins and 'steaks' were bagged up the rest gets taken to a meat shop and made into a summer sausage. This is real popular around here-everyone debates who makes the better one. We'll take some of this as our contribution to a wild game dinner in a couple weeks.

This year we're also getting back some deer bratwurst (they have to add some pork for that). I'm excited to try that. It'll be dinner sometime this weekend.
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#182 mstopy

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Posted 30 November 2007 - 02:53 PM

Venison jerky (smoked) is simply mah-vah-lous. Freeze large pieces of boneless round until firm (to ease slicing). Slice to about 1/8 to 3/16 in. thick, with good knife skills if you don't have a slicing machine. Getting the strips thin and uniform is worth the effort.

Marinate the strips for about an hour. Lots of room for creativity on the marinade.

Lay strips on a smoker rack or hang them on bacon hangers (not touching each other). Allow strips to dry at room temp until the surface is dry and forms a glossy layer (pellicle). Smoke the strips at 130 F with light smoke for 6 to 8 hours. Continue to dry at 130 until the strips crack when you bend them sharply but not to the point where they break when you bend 'em.

The last batch I made had an Asian twist -

5 lb venison strips
1/2 cup good quality fish sauce (nam pla)
1/4 unseasoned rice vinegar
1/4 shoyu (or soy or tamari sauce)
2 T sambal oelek
2 T brown sugar
20 g crushed garlic
10 g fresh grated ginger
10 g Prague cure #1 (optional - I like the cured taste)

#183 Darcie B

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Posted 01 December 2007 - 07:05 PM

A friend brought over some big ol' venison chunks and asked me to cook it for him. He wanted at least part of it smoked. There was one package marked 'shoulder' and one package descriptively marked 'chunk.' :blink: Anyway, I brined it overnight while I perused this thread for ideas since I had never cooked anything but ground venison before.

I partially disassembled the shoulder part since it was very long. I cubed the trimmings from that plus a chunk of the 'chunk' and did a simple braise with onion, carrot, sherry, broth and fresh herbs. I took the remaining pieces, rubbed them with a Morrocan style rub, and threw them on the smoker for 2 hours @ about 200 degrees. I transferred those pieces to the oven for another 2 hours. The 'smoke ring' was incredible - about 1/2 inch. The meat was a tad dry but not bad, and was fairly tender. My friend proclaimed it a great success and is going to bring more to me later. We are going to do some jerky next time too.

Thanks to Susan and everyone for the great advice in this thread. We didn't have to order pizza as I had feared. :raz:
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#184 markemorse

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Posted 02 December 2007 - 04:17 PM

Thought of this thread when I was Googling "pipian rojo" and came up with quite a few hits for venison. Here's one of the more interesting links.

#185 snowangel

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 11:10 AM

Given that we have a chest freezer (not the biggest model on the block, but not a small one) that is filled with venison, that's what we're eating.

Ragu with venison. Definite hit.

The beef stew recipe from Cradle of Flavour. Another hit.

Currently on the stove is a massaman curry with venison.

But, as to the cuts. Wow, do I love the neck meat. Perhaps next year, I can get my FIL to swap out the necks for tenderloins. That neck meat just melts in one's mouth with not that much of a low and slow simmer. The shoulder stew meat in the massaman is much slower to let the tough stuff go.

I've promised my family one night per meal that doesn't feature venison. Oh, my, I have a lot of venison in the freezer, and I'm loving it!
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#186 Sentiamo

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Posted 04 December 2007 - 08:52 PM

http://www.nzvenison...tents_right.asp

I discovered this page for a friend a few days ago....so many wonderful recipes there that I might take up hunting myself.

#187 teagal

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 06:51 PM

I just got back from the 'wild game' dinner and the hit of the night, at least at our table was the corned deer. So moist and really good.
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#188 snowangel

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Posted 08 December 2007 - 07:06 PM

I just got back from the 'wild game' dinner and the hit of the night, at least at our table was the corned deer.  So moist and really good.

View Post


Can you supply any more details on this? Cut, prep method, hints, etc., etc.?
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#189 snowangel

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Posted 17 December 2007 - 08:14 PM

To add to to what I've made so far:

tacos with ground vension
prik king curry (a Thai jungle curry with long beans and ground vension)
a beyond awesome "beef" and potato curry from Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook

But, the more I look at the venison in the freezer (oh, me oh my, you're going to see a lot of it on the table in the next year!), I can't stress how much more I like the stuff that I butchered. As mentioned up-topic, one of my deer was professionally done, one by me. When I did it myself, BTW, I was ably assisted by a great book -- "Making the Most of Your Deer" by Dennis Walrod. He does a wonderful job of explaining how to field dress, break it down, how to cut the hunks o deer off the bones, etc., and even includes directions on how to make a candelabra out of the antlers!

But, what I'm most loving about the vension I butchered myself is that I really marked the packages well. When I get them from the meat market, its pretty much stamps like chops, ground, steaks, roasts, stew, etc.

When I did it myself, I was able to clearly mark whether the meat came from the neck (meltingly soft), neck (add "good for braise" to the label), big stew meat, little stew meat, kabobs, stir-fry, leg steaks, etc., etc.

The meat from the shoulders seems to be the toughest. The leg breaks down into four parts (think Denver Leg). Parts of this are better suited to steaks and super tender than others. But, I've learned that even with vension, an extremely low braising temp can turn a leaner cut of meat into a work of art).

In addition, by doing it myself, I was able to package the meat in quantities appropriate for my use. Before I butchered, I looked at some recipes I was interested in, and took note of how much our family eats at one time, and took note of what I would use for things I wanted leftovers of.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#190 janeer

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Posted 18 December 2007 - 09:52 PM

Wow, do I love the neck meat.



I am so jealous. I love the neck meat for making mincemeat, and haven't been able to get my hands on any in years--since I moved away from my one hunting friend.

#191 teagal

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 06:12 PM

For the corned deer I found out they used the shoulder and soaked it in a brine for 10 days--sorry, but that's all I could find out. It really was great.
Cheese - milk's leap toward immortality. Clifton Fadiman

#192 snowangel

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Posted 06 January 2008 - 07:28 PM

Thanks for the update on the corned venison.

As an update here, we've had more curry, venison larb ( :wub: ), sloppy joes, tacos, more curry, a couple of pot roasts, and I'm thinking of a combined fatty pork and venison rendang. As I said at dinner the other night "You asked for chicken? I thought you said venison!" I figure I still have another 100+ pounds to go through. As I said to the kids "Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it!"
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#193 Chufi

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:37 AM

we were having mole (with guinea fowl )yesterday and I was thinking, that venison mole would be a very good thing. I have some mole left in the freezer and I think I will try this soon.. have to empty the freezer before we move anyway!

#194 Shelby

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Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:53 AM

We eat venison that I've cut up and packaged all year long. In fact, I hardly every buy beef.

For corned venison, we brine ours for a month.

#195 viva

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 12:55 PM

This thread is incredibly helpful!! Family has asked if I want to "go in on a deer", and if so, what cuts I want. Uh... okay... so...

Here's my list from what I've gleaned from eG threads and cookbooks - all please feel free to audit for additional suggestions or complete craziness:

- fillet (to use in La Cucina di Lidia's recipe for fillet of venison in a red wine sauce)

- leg (to roast using Fifi's method above with pork skin and fat - maybe stuffed with mushrooms/leeks/rosemary? Can you stuff a deer leg?) ETA: and which leg are we talking about here? Front? Back? I've been looking at this primal cuts chart and have been getting confused: Venison Primal Cuts

- stew meat (for venison pot pie and venison stew in wine)

- ground (for a shepherd's pie concoction plus burgers)

- backstrap (to make Mayhaw Man's backstrap recipe from the Braising Bambi thread) - from the chart linked above, backstrap = loin, yes?

- sausage

- a few pounds of scraps and bones to add to stew/braising liquids


Thoughts?

Edited by viva, 02 September 2008 - 01:15 PM.

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#196 Shelby

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 02:40 PM

I'd definitely stay away from from the leg--unless you're making a roast out of the hind quarters or front quarters. Any lower than that and the meat is filled with tendons and is VERY tough.

#197 budrichard

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 02:51 PM

I avoid sausage as its usually made from a composite of many animals and I avoid scraps and bones just because we have CWD here in Wisconsin and everything is boned out and no cuts are made into the bones or spinal column. -Dick

Edited by budrichard, 02 September 2008 - 02:52 PM.


#198 Dejah

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 05:30 PM

I'd definitely stay away from from the leg--unless you're making a roast out of  the hind quarters or front quarters.  Any lower than that and the meat is filled with tendons and is VERY tough.

View Post


Give the legs, front and back ones to some older Chinese folks. The tendons are prized for medicinal soups in building strength in the consumer's legs.

A friend of mine went hunting with a group and gave my cooks 40 legs! They worked for hours stripping the tendons. These were cleaned, dried, then takened back to China on one of their visits home. The soup is cooked slowly with specific herbs - often in "double pots".
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#199 viva

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Posted 02 September 2008 - 07:49 PM

I'd definitely stay away from from the leg--unless you're making a roast out of  the hind quarters or front quarters.  Any lower than that and the meat is filled with tendons and is VERY tough.

View Post



Definitely interested in a roast. Are you referring to the rump/haunch and shoulder cuts? And avoiding the shins/shank? Or is "hind quarter" something a deer processor would understand?

Alternatively, could you use the shanks for Osso Bucco?

Sorry if these are silly questions - never done this before!! :smile: Trying to read these meat charts online is frustrating - everyone seems to refer to cuts of meat using different terms. :sad:
...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

#200 Shelby

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 05:21 AM

I'd definitely stay away from from the leg--unless you're making a roast out of  the hind quarters or front quarters.  Any lower than that and the meat is filled with tendons and is VERY tough.

View Post



Definitely interested in a roast. Are you referring to the rump/haunch and shoulder cuts? And avoiding the shins/shank? Or is "hind quarter" something a deer processor would understand?

Alternatively, could you use the shanks for Osso Bucco?

Sorry if these are silly questions - never done this before!! :smile: Trying to read these meat charts online is frustrating - everyone seems to refer to cuts of meat using different terms. :sad:

View Post


Hey, you're doing great! I grew up cutting up our own deer and now I cut up at least three a winter.

I wouldn't use the shanks. I see above where some make soup, but I don't have the patience to get all of the tendons out. Believe me when I say they are seriously stringy.

Yes, we make rump, shoulder and round roasts--delicious in the crock pot!

#201 viva

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Posted 03 September 2008 - 08:42 AM

Thanks very much for the help! I think I will avoid the shanks as I cannot see having the patience for all those tendons.

My last note of confusion... it looks like the terms backstrap = loin = tenderloin = fillet are all the same cut of meat, the pieces that run down the back of the deer?
...wine can of their wits the wise beguile, make the sage frolic, and the serious smile. --Alexander Pope

#202 Recoil Rob

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Posted 04 September 2008 - 08:01 AM

I butcher my own deer every year, or at least every year I get one. Properly gutted and handled I treat it no different than good beef. I've seen guys drop ff a 125lb deer at the butchers and come back with 10 pounds of steak and 70 pounds of ground meet, just protein. A waste.

I usually take one whole hind quarter and have it custom smoked at Nodines Smokehouse, make a seriously good ham dinner. The other is roasted whole using bacon for a fat covering or I have BBQ'd whole hind quarters. It's an impressive piece of meat and it seems a waste to cut it into thin steaks.

I usually have cut the backstrap area into rack of venison and do it like rack of lamp. Alternately it can be done Florentine style, simply pan roasted and drizzled with EVOO and herbs.

As for the shanks, you can certainly make Osso Deero but I find just a slow braise and they are excellent. The tendons melt down and there's a reason to stay home and cook on a winters day.

BTW, although I have made my own sausage adding nothing but pork fat, most of the neck meat is chunked for chili's or stew, not ground.

The shoulders are boned out ad make some nice small steaks and rolled roasts.

Finally all major bones are browned for stock. Just be sure to degrease.

Edited by Recoil Rob, 04 September 2008 - 08:04 AM.

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#203 snowangel

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 05:56 PM

Although I usually break down my own vension (well, the venison that my FIL loving shoots for me), I've never skinned one. I've been instructed to report to their house on Friday to skin and quarter a deer. BTW, once it's quartered, I can make fast work of it.

But, I've never skinned one, and I have been asked to "bring knives."

Help!
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#204 Peter the eater

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 08:10 PM

Although I usually break down my own vension (well, the venison that my FIL loving shoots for me), I've never skinned one.  I've been instructed to report to their house on Friday to skin and quarter a deer.  BTW, once it's quartered, I can make fast work of it.

But, I've never skinned one, and I have been asked to "bring knives."

Help!

View Post

Susan, please take pictures for us. B&W or Sepia works. I've never shot or skinned a deer but I love to barter with my neighbors and heavily armed friends.
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

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#205 Magictofu

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 08:43 PM

Although I never did butcher a whole animal, I find that Mettler's Basic Butchering of Livestock & Game is a very instructive book:
http://www.amazon.co...26547571&sr=8-1

Pictures and a short report would be very appreciated.

#206 Magictofu

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Posted 12 November 2008 - 08:51 PM

There are more than a few videos of the procedure on youtube, this one is short but you can also click on icons in the related videos for more choices.



#207 Hard H2O

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 08:44 AM

Here is my b-i-ls buck he got opening morning this year.
Posted Image

Here is the knife I used to field dress it for him.
Posted Image
It is the custom with the red micarta handle. The other is my Buck #103 skinner. Both of these work great for skinning and gutting deer.

We used to process ourselves. It is hard to get everyone together to do the job so we take them in to Jordan's in Woodbury now.

Skinning is easy. Once you get them started they pretty much slip out of the skin themselves. Some get it started and then tie a galf ball in for a knob and pull the skin off.

Here is a good thread from an outdoors site about the subject:
Butchering a deer

Here is another interesting link.


Notice he is using a Chicago Cutlery parer for skinning. Any sharp knife will work. It doesn't need to be big just sharp.

We always used a torch to burn off any stray hair.

Good luck.

#208 snowangel

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 01:25 PM

Well, the knives are out on the counter for my husband to sharpen tonight. I seriously need to clean out the deep freeze, because I have the meat from a 7 point buck coming home with me tomorrow. I'll get the meat cut off the quarters in the next coupla days, so I've bought some time.

But, just what do I do with the hide?
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#209 Hard H2O

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 01:35 PM

Well, the knives are out on the counter for my husband to sharpen tonight.  I seriously need to clean out the deep freeze, because I have the meat from a 7 point buck coming home with me tomorrow.  I'll get the meat cut off the quarters in the next coupla days, so I've bought some time.

But, just what do I do with the hide?

View Post


You can have it tanned and use it or what most of the hunter I know do is donate them. Look near your local sporting goods or big game registration stations. Someone will have a Hides for Habitat box. Sometimes they will give you gloves for your hide. I do not know if anyone is doing that any more.

Here is a link for the Hides for Habitat:
Hides for Habitat

#210 Smithy

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Posted 13 November 2008 - 02:53 PM

I second Hard H20's suggestion.

I've had a few hides tanned in order to make the deerskin leather vest and/or skirt I want someday. They're still sitting in my storage area, waiting for my "someday" to arrive. Every hide since then has gone to the "Hides for Habitat" box, whence said hide will be turned into something useful that earns money for its program. The boxes are all over the place up here. You can probably find them in your area pretty easily, as well.

eta: and yes, skinning is pretty easy. The best knife to use is something with a fairly sharp edge but not much of a point, to minimize the risk of poking a hole in the skin. The blade edge should be sharper than a butter knife, but again, not so sharp that it would readily slip through the connective tissue and slice the skin.

Edited by Smithy, 13 November 2008 - 03:01 PM.

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