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Q&A -- Autumn and Festive Preserves

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39 replies to this topic

#31 jackal10

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Posted 28 November 2003 - 09:54 AM

The mincemeat I know and love is NOT cooked until the final cooking in a pie.
The suet is the kideney fat chopped small, not melted or clarified.
If you add meat, its also chopped and raw, and the high levels of alcohol and sugar act as preservative.

I have put up old recipes on a sperate thread

#32 Jensen

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Posted 05 December 2003 - 10:54 AM

My friend, whose son-in-law owns an upscale butcher shop in the Bay Area, was able to bring me some suet (yeah!) so I'm now almost set to make my mincemeat. Can you tell me what the yield of your recipe is? I don't have the pretty little glass sealers but would like to pick some up tonight. I reckon it's not going to hurt the mincemeat to sit in the bowl for a little while :smile:

Thanks!

===

I found some pint jars stored away and, to answer my own question ... 7 pints!

Edited by Jensen, 06 December 2003 - 04:48 AM.


#33 tjaehnigen

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Posted 15 December 2003 - 08:23 AM

OK, here is a follow-up question about mincemeat pie...

We adapted a James Beard prepaation using my wife's great-grandmother's ingredients. My main question is, how 'wet' is the mixture supposed to be? We dumped a whole bottle of port into the 6 pounds of meat, 1 pound of suet, 3 pounds of raisins, 3 pounds of apples, 1.5 pounds of currants, etc mixture and it was still way too dry looking to me.

So, for better or worse, here is what we did to augment the mixture to make it more wet--

we added about another quarter bottle of port, maybe 6-8 oounces of cognac, 6-8 ounces of sherry and a good measure of the beef broth that was created when we boiled the beef prior to grinding it. It got pretty wet, but there was still no amount of liquid sitting in the bottom of the pot -- which I assume should be there to soak up the liquid over time.

Is the mixture wet enough without there being any liquid to further be sucked up over time, or should I keep monitoring the wetness and just add some as needed? And what liquid should I use -- more booze, beef broth (which is unsalted) or both or something else (water?)???

Help!

#34 jackal10

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 01:59 AM

I use rum or brandy, and add just enough to damp the mixture - maybe a couple of glasses. However I don't have the meat, and even if I did I would have equal amounts to the suet - about half your amount. Also a lot more fruit - I use 4-5lbs fruit to 1lb suet, 1lb sugar, and if used 1lb meat.

If you eat it cold then a broth that will jelly might be appropriate

#35 tjaehnigen

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 06:48 AM

Interesting. Well, we're using a recipe from my wife's great grandmother, without any instructions, so we're kind of winging it. I am tending to think we need to go more alcohol than broth but I don't want to kill everyone when they eat this. Still, it has to go in the oven for a while in the pie crust, so perhaps some of the alcohol will 'burn off'??

#36 Dan Ryan

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Posted 15 April 2004 - 10:09 AM

Fantastic course. I understand you planted your own quince tree. Superb idea, I can't believe you think you might have too many. What about making some booze infusions? In the Balkans they use quince to make a delicious schnapps, but as home distilling is frowned on (ok, illegal) in the UK, perhaps baking and infusing is the way to go. I make quince cheese myself, and have started experimenting with it as a cocktail ingredient. Zubrowka bison grass vodka seems the obvious partner.

Edited by Dan Ryan, 15 April 2004 - 10:24 AM.


#37 Txacoli

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Posted 14 October 2013 - 03:59 PM

We have membrillo on our menu as part of a savory/cheese course.  Each batch is like re-inventing the wheel.....some are dark, some bright, some perfectly firm, others hopelessly sticky.

 

Is the final consistency due to the stage of sugar carmelization......or the dryness of the mix?  I have a beautiful batch right now at 180 degrees F, and a darker brown batch at 160.  Harold McGee is silent on the subject, except to say that cooking in the skins is important to capture the violet ionones.

 

Perhaps the amount of lemon juice needs to be better regulated?

 

Many thanks for your post, and any help.



#38 Txacoli

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Posted 04 November 2013 - 03:54 PM

Well, alrighty then.  The silence in this forum is deafening.....so I will answer my own questions:

 

The firmness of the membrillo appears to be completely unrelated to sugar temperature.  Pectin does the job.  Also, since we were doing 50 pounds of quince we rapidly got over peeling the quince.  Absolutely no need to peel, and cooking them takes advantage of the fragrance of the ionones.  We actually preferred the color and flavor of the batches with peels ground in. We simply quarter the quince, remove the seeds and steam them in a few inches of water.  Further, there is no need to remove the syrup, unless you have mass quantities of water to very few quince.  In fact, our most successful batch by far was the wettest.  The drier batch resisted all attempts to puree it fine enough for that smooth, beautiful texture.  Plus we nearly blew up two immersion blenders and our VitaMix.

 

So, to review the Cachagua General Store membrillo recipe:  5 pounds of quince, quartered and seeded. Two quarts of water.  Cover and cook until soft.  Puree my any means necessary but be careful of your motors.  Add five pounds of sugar, cook slowly, covered with a screen to avoid burns.  Stir occassionally, immersion blend occaisonally.  When finished pour onto halfsheets covered with parchment, or into silicone molds.

 

We put the sheets in our Wolf gas oven overnight just on the pilot to finish drying a bit.  Perfect!

 

I will post photos of the process as soon as my iPhone decides to communicate with my laptop.


Edited by Txacoli, 04 November 2013 - 04:42 PM.


#39 Mjx

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 01:18 AM

I'm sorry I didn't see this until now. I've been making far smaller batches than yours (from Japanese quinces), and although a few don't set up as well, most set up firmly.

 

I always leave the skins on while cooking, and my weapon of choice is a food mill; a first pass removes the sees and such, a second fines it down (and I think may release more pectin).


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#40 Txacoli

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Posted 05 November 2013 - 01:31 PM

Well, alrighty then.  The silence in this forum is deafening.....so I will answer my own questions:

 

The firmness of the membrillo appears to be completely unrelated to sugar temperature.  Pectin does the job.  Also, since we were doing 50 pounds of quince we rapidly got over peeling the quince.  Absolutely no need to peel, and cooking them takes advantage of the fragrance of the ionones.  We actually preferred the color and flavor of the batches with peels ground in. We simply quarter the quince, remove the seeds and steam them in a few inches of water.  Further, there is no need to remove the syrup, unless you have mass quantities of water to very few quince.  In fact, our most successful batch by far was the wettest.  The drier batch resisted all attempts to puree it fine enough for that smooth, beautiful texture.  Plus we nearly blew up two immersion blenders and our VitaMix.

 

So, to review the Cachagua General Store membrillo recipe:  5 pounds of quince, quartered and seeded. Two quarts of water.  Cover and cook until soft.  Puree my any means necessary but be careful of your motors.  Add five pounds of sugar, cook slowly, covered with a screen to avoid burns.  Stir occassionally, immersion blend occaisonally.  When finished pour onto halfsheets covered with parchment, or into silicone molds.

 

We put the sheets in our Wolf gas oven overnight just on the pilot to finish drying a bit.  Perfect!

 

I will post photos of the process as soon as my iPhone decides to communicate with my laptop.

Voila, photos.

 

Our food mill crushed up the seeds, and I didn't like the tannins released by cooking the seeds in the mash......but arms recover easier than VitaMix motors!  Our final batch I think we will follow your lead and run the quarters through the food mill, then hit the mash with the immersion blender to get it super smooth.

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