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Shanghai Restaurant Recommendations


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#61 Franci

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Posted 18 February 2006 - 03:43 PM

Well, I agree, I wouldn't eat French food! I have been in Shanghai in September and I had great food!
To me, for such a big city it's tough if you don't know the language. My husband is shanghainese and he know the dialect, but still he left in 86 and he was not used to ordering food. More than the Bond I really liked Xintiandi, it's a relaxing oasi in the caos of the city. Touristy a bit, but nice and good restaurants.

I found this places very good:

Crystal Jade Unit 12 A, House 6-7, Lane 123 Kingye lu, (tel. 6385 8752), it's in Xintiandi
The noodle soup, the wonton soup where excellent!!! and the steam buns (best I had), plus the crispy pork skin cantonese style. Very trendy and chic place, but we spent nothing for american standards, a lot for chinese (about 15$ a person)

Also in Xintiandi we tried a place I think is called Best seafood, or similar name. You can pick the fish you like from the tank. We wanted something simple so we ordered steamed fish and shrimps plus bai tzai and other vegetables.

I don't think is still season but how to miss otherwise the famous shanghainese crab?
Wangbaohe restaurant 603 Fuzhou Lu, tel 633223673

I had very, very good food at Han Tong in the French Concession (350 yaun in 4), but we had family friends ordering for us, the same people took us also to a closed by restaurant, guess is called "chuan san jia" (sichuan food)

I also had a chance to try some japanese (very good, indeed!) Zen 1o piano di Jinjiang Gourmet Street, 59 Maoming Nanlu, by Changle Lu (5466 5070), same building first floor there is another famous french restaurant. This place is a little tricky to find.
And don't miss a nice mongolian bbq!

Edited by Franci, 18 February 2006 - 03:53 PM.


#62 stickavish

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 04:43 AM

I'm living here at the moment.
Three at the Bund is the epicenter for high-end Western food.
Laris, Jean-Georges (will probably fall into your 'contemporary' tag on some points - using acyl gellans, chemicals that turn liquid fats into a dry powder, and then re-form on your tongue, etc.),
Whampoa Club (previous comment was in line with opinion here - great, modern and inventive Shanghainese), and then Sens on the Bund (pourcel brothers shanghai outpost), and the new Jade restaurant at Pudong Shangri-la.
Crystal Jade is a local favorite, and one of the best restaurants in town for multi-regional Chinese. Fantastic la mian (hand pulled noodles), xiao long bao (one of the shanghai legends) dumplings, shen jiang bao. The roast meats - pork, duck - are done to perfection, although I have to say my favorite is the chinese eggplant and fresh crab, bound with a little big of egg white.
The 'rich expatriate' cliche of these restaurant's clientele is a little naive. The local, and Hong Kong businessmen here are making enormous sums of money, and i would venture to guess much more than your average Western businessman out for a nice dinner at Jean-Georges. Just take a look around the dining rooms of these places.
Prices vary as much as the food. You can find incredible shen jiang bao on Wujiang Lu for under $0.50, or you can spend $200 per person at one of the afore-mentioned businesses and come away disappointed. Sure, you can eat your meals for $2-3 per day, but you're going to dig through ALOT of mediocre (at best) dishes with the rare gem - the shen jian bao, for example. Prices at the western restaurants are in line with the global market. Shanghai has cheap options, but is not cheap by any stretch of the imagination, if you're patronizing the fine dining restaurants.

#63 Julian Teoh

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 02:41 PM

I'm living here at the moment.
Three at the Bund is the epicenter for high-end Western food.
Laris, Jean-Georges (will probably fall into your 'contemporary' tag on some points - using acyl gellans, chemicals that turn liquid fats into a dry powder, and then re-form on your tongue, etc.),
Whampoa Club (previous comment was in line with opinion here - great, modern and inventive Shanghainese), and then Sens on the Bund (pourcel brothers shanghai outpost), and the new Jade restaurant at Pudong Shangri-la.
Crystal Jade is a local favorite, and one of the best restaurants in town for multi-regional Chinese. Fantastic la mian (hand pulled noodles), xiao long bao (one of the shanghai legends) dumplings, shen jiang bao. The roast meats - pork, duck - are done to perfection, although I have to say my favorite is the chinese eggplant and fresh crab, bound with a little big of egg white.
The 'rich expatriate' cliche of these restaurant's clientele is a little naive. The local, and Hong Kong businessmen here are making enormous sums of money, and i would venture to guess much more than your average Western businessman out for a nice dinner at Jean-Georges. Just take a look around the dining rooms of these places.
Prices vary as much as the food. You can find incredible shen jiang bao on Wujiang Lu for under $0.50, or you can spend $200 per person at one of the afore-mentioned businesses and come away disappointed. Sure, you can eat your meals for $2-3 per day, but you're going to dig through ALOT of mediocre (at best) dishes with the rare gem - the shen jian bao, for example. Prices at the western restaurants are in line with the global market. Shanghai has cheap options, but is not cheap by any stretch of the imagination, if you're patronizing the fine dining restaurants.

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Just further on my last post, the tasting menu at Whampoa club is about 145 RMB, which is around $20.

Stickavish, have you been to Sens & Bund? I've tasted Thierry Alix's food and it seems he was much more comfortable with classic French dishes such as bar de ligne and eggplant caviar. The tasting menu that I had incorporated some Vietnamese flavours which jangled like a schoolkids' musical recital. Perhaps it is a case of working in some influences to cater to an affluent crowd who would expect some Asian influences (seeing they are in Asia) but without truly understanding the use and underpinning of such flavours. Definitely a case of confusion food.
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#64 froggio

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Posted 03 March 2006 - 05:55 PM

Hi,
I also live and work in Shgh.
TOTB has 4 restaurants, two of which stand out in my biased opinion: "JG" and "Whampoa Club". The first one is well known in the US and the most profesional kitchen in Shgh. THe second one is a 'nouvelle cuisine' chinese restaurant.
Sens on Bund (Pourcel Bros) is another good western restaurant, also on the Bund.
In Xin Tian Di you will find T8, a western restaurant with an australian chef. Good but pricey for what you get but always busy. Most restaurants in XTD are overpriced if compared for what one would get in the US for the same amount of money.
Apart from these, there are some small independent restaurants such as 239, Shikumen, Mesa, Viva, further down the quality ladder Des Lys, Saleya, La Seine (this last one served me one the worst french meal I ever had) etc.
There seems to be a gap to be filled between those two segments, the high end such as JG and the low end such as Saleya.
The Shgh restaurant scene is still partly defined by restaurants in hotels. Brand names such as Ritz-Carlton (Palladio), Shangri-La (Jade on 36) etc. were the first to establish a presence in the post-Mao era and are still playing a role in the western dining experience. This will change in the future as chinese standards and expectations rise, free standing restaurants almost always give better food and service quality than large corporate hotel chains' and I would know first hand :-)
Feel free to contact me if you need any further info. I opened JG restaurant here in Shgh and know the scene fairly well.
Cheers.

#65 hzrt8w

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Posted 04 March 2006 - 01:33 AM

froggio: Welcome to eGullet! Hope to hear from you more about the food in Shanghai.
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#66 silentbob

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Posted 29 April 2006 - 08:51 AM

I had a great dinner in Shanghai with my tour group earlier this month, but forgot what the place was called (except that it had "2000" or "2004" in the name). This joint served some reasonably creative Chinese fare, and was probably about a 10 minute drive from the Sheraton Grand Tai Ping Yang (in the Hongqiao district) where we were staying.

Google searches have been unfruitful. Can someone help me figure out the restaurant's name?

#67 chengb02

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Posted 01 May 2006 - 02:08 AM

TOTB has 4 restaurants, two of which stand out in my biased opinion: "JG"

Most restaurants in XTD are overpriced if compared for what one would get in the US for the same amount of money.

Apart from these, there are some small independent restaurants such as 239, Shikumen, Mesa, Viva, further down the quality ladder Des Lys, Saleya, La Seine (this last one served me one the worst french meal I ever had) etc.
There seems to be a gap to be filled between those two segments, the high end such as JG and the low end such as Saleya.

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Jean Georges is excellent, I've been there a number of times. The one thing I was most happy about was that the menu the last time I was there (about a month ago) was far more complex and on par with what you get at JG elsewhere in the world than it was a year ago.

Xintiandi is overpriced for the quality that you will get. If you're going to be in Shanghai for less than a year, its not worth bothering with XTD unless you have someone else who is paying. The food will be good, but far below what you'd get anywhere else for a similar price.

froggio was absolutely right about the gap between the few near the top and all the rest, there is very little middle ground when it comes to western food in Shanghai. However, there are a number of Chinese places that sort of fit in this gap, like Qiao Jiang Nan, which isn't quite at the high end but also pays attention to many of the details that you get at a high end restaurant.

#68 ulterior epicure

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 06:24 PM

Jean Georges is excellent, I've been there a number of times.  The one thing I was most happy about was that the menu the last time I was there (about a month ago) was far more complex and on par with what you get at JG elsewhere in the world than it was a year ago.

If you don't mind - prices for tasting menus/food/lunch? You would happened to have taken pictures?

Thanks!
u.e.

Edited by ulterior epicure, 02 May 2006 - 06:24 PM.

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#69 chengb02

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Posted 02 May 2006 - 11:06 PM

Jean Georges is excellent, I've been there a number of times.  The one thing I was most happy about was that the menu the last time I was there (about a month ago) was far more complex and on par with what you get at JG elsewhere in the world than it was a year ago.

If you don't mind - prices for tasting menus/food/lunch? You would happened to have taken pictures?

Thanks!
u.e.

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I will try to go back and check the prices, this time I was only there for lunch. I believe that in the past the seasonal menu for dinner runs RMB 598 and the tasting menu is RMB 798. I believe the set lunch is RMB 180 allowing you the choice of 2-3 appetizers, 2-3 main courses, and 2-3 dessert options. I do have pictures from the lunch and will try to post them in the next few days. In the other thread you asked about concessions to the Asian palette, as far as I saw on the menu, there were very few.

#70 ulterior epicure

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Posted 03 May 2006 - 02:22 AM

thanks! can't wait to see and read all about it!

cheers.
u.e.
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#71 silentbob

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 12:20 PM

Okay, I managed to track down the restaurant name -- it's Tang 2000, located on the second floor at 432 Huaihai West Road in the Changning district. If anyone happens to be in Shanghai and ends up eating there, I'd love to hear what you think. From what I can tell, the prices are fairly gentle for what we considered to be an excellent meal.

#72 ulterior epicure

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 01:16 PM

Thanks for the tip, silentbob.

u.e.
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#73 wonderbread

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 03:15 PM

I just got back from Shanghai - we ate at M on the Bund, which is run by an Australian chef. It's right next to Three on the Bund. Brunch cost about 250RMB per person.

The entrees were OK. I had a platter of meats, a pretty good lamb chop, a minute steak, sausage, bacon, mashed potatoes and a fried egg.

Our favorite part of the meal was the pavlova. It's enormous though, so order to share.

Didn't go back for dinner and ran out of time on the trip to go to Jean-Georges! The staff gave us a lovely tour of the restaurant though.

#74 maryeats

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Posted 24 June 2006 - 01:45 AM

I am taking a trip to Shanghai in a couple of weeks and am looking for some good eats. Any recommendations?

I already have reservations at M on the Bund, and 3 on the Bund, and am looking forward to steamed buns at the Yuan Gardens. What else?
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#75 jack daniels

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Posted 25 June 2006 - 04:13 PM

I Strongly Recommend going to Di Shui Dong Restaurant at 2/F Maoming Nan Lu, Near Changle Lu. It is a little hard to find, around the corner from the Brooks Brothers Store. Don't miss out on the Lamb Ribs, Smoked Pork, and Spicy Beef.

What restaurant are you planning on going at 3 on the Bund?

#76 maryeats

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 07:59 AM

Thanks for the suggestions.

We are going to Jean George at 3 on the Bund. We ate at the one in Hong Kong a couple of years ago and it was one of the most memorable meals I've had. Though I heard that the Shanghai outpost is leaning towards a style of foams and deconstructed soups ala Jose Andrea. Is it true?
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#77 Pan

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Posted 26 June 2006 - 01:50 PM

Mary, have you looked through any of the previous threads covering food in Shanghai? If not, look through those search results for more suggestions.

#78 Fengyi

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Posted 04 July 2006 - 02:39 AM

I just had lunch today at M on the Bund - the set lunch was RMB118 for two courses (138 for three) and it was excellent! I had the Moroccan spiced salad and the lamb burger. Both were very nice and were surprisingly large. My SO pronounced the lamb burger as one of the best that he has ever had. His ginger cake was also very good, though the icing was a touch too sweet. He also had the duck terrine (very firm and meaty) and the linguine with clams (rather too buttery and oily but with good flavour).
The comfortable surroundings were very welcome after a rather sticky walk along the Bund and it was great to do everything in English for a change (the staff are excellently fluent) after two weeks of solid translating while touring about China! :biggrin:
I will try and post some more about eating in China (found a very very good jiaozi place in Xi'an - a hot tip from my neighbour on the Beijing to Xi'an flight) as soon as I get my act together and have time to catch my breath a bit!

PS we went to Shanghai Renjia (I presume it's a chain) near Tianlin lu yesterday (was brought there by the organizers of the wine competition we were judging) and had a gorgeous steamed egg custard topped with Chinese Foie Gras. Gosh! That was lovely. I've only had the Pidan and Xaindan versions of that. The Foie went really well and the fat from it flavoured the eggs very nicely. According to the Shanghai-based people there, Chinese Foie Gras is easier and easier to get and remarkably cheap as well (though apparently it's best to have a contact within the foreign restauranteurs).
Anyway, that was the best dish for certain :smile:
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#79 maryeats

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Posted 11 July 2006 - 06:35 AM

Well, I am back from Shanghai and I am stuffed. Thanks for all your suggestions.

I am happy to report that Shanghai boasts a slew of eating options, from chili packed street food to fine dining, and those soup dumplings!

Singapore and Hong Kong may have a new rival for the crown of best Asia eats.

M on the Bund is delightful for weekend brunch, Jean George stunning at any time of day. The Nanxiang Steamed Bun restaurant in the Yuan Garden is worth the wait. And the "snack street" off Nanjing road is a tempting walk with dumplings, crayfish, and noodles galore.

Here are some photos of my eating adventure.

http://forums.egulle...3121_185015.jpg Street breakfast

http://forums.egulle..._3121_19799.jpg The big dumpling at The Nanxiang Steamed Bun restaurant

http://forums.egulle..._3121_35769.jpg Beef noodle soup on the snack food street

http://forums.egulle..._3121_46971.jpg Braised pork ribs at Luna in the Xintiandi

http://forums.egulle..._3121_79293.jpg Brunch at M on the Bund

http://forums.egulle..._3121_89598.jpg King fish sashimi with grapefruit sorbet at Jean George

http://forums.egulle...3121_180808.jpg Spicy Green Beans

http://forums.egulle...3121_187931.jpg Crayfish
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#80 ulterior epicure

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Posted 23 July 2006 - 11:06 AM

Wondering if anyone can help me out (give advice):

Top two fine dining restos in Shanghai... I hope one of them is J-G because I really want to visit.

Bonus points if you can provide the price (either in $ or RMB) for their tasting menus (or equivalent fare).

Thanks!
u.e.
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#81 froggio

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Posted 25 July 2006 - 09:05 AM

Top two fine dining restos in Shanghai... I hope one of them is J-G because I really want to visit.
Thanks!


I think JG is the best western restaurant in Shanghai at the moment. Great "modern" food like you would eat in the top NY restaurants. The chef likes to be challenged, don't hesitate to throw a monkey's wrench here and there...

#82 maryeats

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 08:32 AM

Wondering if anyone can help me out (give advice):

Top two fine dining restos in Shanghai... I hope one of them is J-G because I really want to visit.

Bonus points if you can provide the price (either in $ or RMB) for their tasting menus (or equivalent fare).

Thanks!
u.e.

View Post


I just ate at JG at the beginning of July. The tasting menus were about 100US per person. But it is a lot of food! My husband and I ordered appetizers, mains, and a dessert and we were stuffed. I think the bill came to around 200 US.

I highly recommend the duck.

Dinner starts with a complimentary amuse boushe, and ends with complimentary chocolates.

It is a stunning stunning restaurant.

Also, M on the Bund is nice for brunch. Very affordable, around 35US for a three course meal.
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#83 Shalmanese

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 09:18 AM

ulterior epicure: Why would you want to go to JG in Shanghai when you can go to the one in NY?
PS: I am a guy.

#84 froggio

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 03:06 PM

Shalmanse: Why would you want to go to JG in Shanghai when you can go to the one in NY?

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coz when you live in China it can be a nice thing to eat once in a while a roasted chicken with fork and knife.

#85 ulterior epicure

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 03:08 PM

So true froggio... but Shalmanse, what would you recommend for a(n American) visitor instead?
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#86 Shalmanese

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Posted 26 July 2006 - 03:17 PM

Shalmanse: Why would you want to go to JG in Shanghai when you can go to the one in NY?

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coz when you live in China it can be a nice thing to eat once in a while a roasted chicken with fork and knife.

View Post


Sure, when your living in China for a while, it can be nice to experience a piece of home. But presumably ulterior epicure is not going to be there long enough to get homesick. It strikes me as the upscale version of taking a taxi from the airport to the Holiday Inn to McDonalds and then back and calling it a holiday.
PS: I am a guy.

#87 estufarian

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 09:37 AM

Couple of Reviews that may help (both expensive by Chinese standards but bargains by western values):
Jean-Georges Shanghai – overall assessment – skip this if you like Jean-Georges in New York! Very patchy meal. Servers have been trained ‘mechanically’ and cannot answer questions, merely recite what they have been told (frequently incorrect). However, their English is far better than my Mandarin.
The following is really two separate menus, served to Myself and AmuseGirl. I’ve combined the two for ease of following the flow.
Coconut ball filled with celery juice (we were told), surrounded with carrot/orange juice: – but tasted entirely of ginger (not mentioned as ingredient).
Caviar Egg (described as scrambled egg, vodka cream and Osetra caviar): Ingredients somewhat accurate, but presentation was with a coddled yolk (no white) and the albumin was folded into the vodka crème. Several pieces of eggshell were scattered through the dish.
Kingfish Sashimi with Mango & Kumquat Ice - the ice was more accurately described as a slurry. Overpowering flavour (again) was ginger.
Sea Scallops with Caramelized Cauliflour with Raisin & Caper Emulsion. Excellent flavours, but could have used some colour for visual effect.
Foie Gras with Dried Cherries and Candied Pistachios. Can’t read all my notes or the full description on this dish. I think they say “Pain Espice not mentioned; gelee was pure vinegar!”
Roasted Young Garlic Soup with Crispy Frogs Legs. Soup was lukewarm but otherwise excellent.
Turbot in a White Wine sauce. Although simply described, an excellent dish. Tasted to me like a Vin Jaune sauce which is definitely more upscale than implied by “white wine”.
Crispy Crabcake on a Bed of Avocado & Cucumber. OK. Here comes that ginger feeling again!
Lobster (On toast) with Pea Shoots (and Peapods) in a Spicy Lobster Broth (bracketed items included but not promised). Sounds excellent, but unfortunately both the peas and especially the lobster were overcooked.
Sea Bass with pureed Parsnip, a puree of Chili/Coconut/Mint and Coconut Broth. I liked this dish. Ingredients worked well together.
Squab with squab foie, Corn fritter, Squab gravy & Arugula. Squab was served on a bed of Onion Compote – but I seem to have given up on comments by this point, so rest of description will just be the items.
Short Ribs with Apple & Cinnamon and Celery puree.

Desserts were themed – you choose a theme and get several variations
Chocolate:
Vietnamese Coffee Liégeois
Salted Milk Chocolate with caramel and szechuan peppercorn
Cacao sorbet with Cassis & Coconut
Jean-Georges Chocolate cake with Vanilla Ice Cream

Tropic:
Pineapple-Maple Snow
Strawberry-Lime melba with lemongrass & Thai basil
Passion fruit tart with Coconut & Mint
Flambéed Banana with Milk Chocolate and Kalamanzi

The meal at Whampoa Club was ultimately more satisfying although far less formal. The lighting is far brighter here (very subdued at Jean-Georges). Also the clientele was more Asian (European at J-G) and probably mainly tourists. There was a procession of people taking photographs out onto the Bund and many families had brought children. The wine list was more sparse and they didn’t have the wine I ordered. The more expensive substitute was, however, charged at the same price as my original selection.
Because I didn’t make detailed tasting notes (the dishes were served banquet style although somewhat sequentially), I will mostly just list the dishes (some comments in brackets). However, when I started asking about ingredients the hostess/manager was assigned to visit our table as each dish came out as her English was fairly good (better than the servers). There were no set menus so we ordered from all over the menu. That way you can control costs as some items were extremely pricy, but overall the meal was fairly priced for what we had (but again note the starting comment for perspective).

Steamed Agar with Shrimp Mousse and Bitter Melon
Almond & Cocoa Fried Spare Ribs (absolutely my favourite dish)
Stir Fried Minced Pigeon with Fragrant Pear in Crispy wrappers
Glutinous Red Dates with Cinnamon Apple & Seared Goose Liver
Crispy Eel Strips
Chilled Drunken Chicken (this was just plain weird, the cold chicken served in a martini glass on a bed of alcoholic shaved ice)
Honey Roasted Pork & Pineapple Tart
Deep Fried King Prawn Coated with Wasabi Dressing and Crispy Prawn Flakes (a visually spectacular dish – huge prawns in a vivid green sauce, but wasabi NOT Horseradish flavour).
Poached Tianjin Pea Starch Noodles with Scallops in a Sour and Spicy Sauce. (Yes, noodles that tasted (and were) entirely made from peas).
Crispy Onions Pancake with Chinese Pork Floss.

I’d go back to Whampoa in a heartbeat – the menu is huge. But I’d skip J-G Shanghai (but J-G New York is in my top 5 restaurants).

#88 ulterior epicure

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 09:46 AM

Thanks estufarian.

That's too bad about J-G. The one in NYC is one of my top 5 as well - so the one in Shanghai's not worth it because of the poor quality - or because it's too similar to the one in NYC?

Has anyone been to M on the Bund?

u.e.
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#89 estufarian

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Posted 02 August 2006 - 10:45 AM

- so the one in Shanghai's not worth it because of the poor quality - or because it's too similar to the one in NYC?

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It's certainly not as good (but few places are). But I wouldn't go as far as "poor quality" more "lacking in execution".

And some dishes are very similar (e.g. the vin jaune dish seems a copy) but, equally, some I wasn't familiar with. So it is different - but not completely so.

#90 ulterior epicure

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Posted 26 August 2006 - 09:55 PM

I recently returned from my trip to China. Alas, I had one meal in Shanghai to myself - and so I went to the gilded storey that is 3 on the Bund to pay visit to one of my favorite chefs - Jean Georges.

First, let me say that the interior design is drop-dead get-out sexy. It's very very very dark inside - like almost goth - with black hard wood-paneled floors and sumptuously thick dark velvet curtains. The design is a very modern take on early century Shanghai - a sleek mix between European and Chinese aesthetics.

The staff is very friendly and accommodating. Helen, the manager is terribly hospitable and kind - and very good at what she does. She moves about, on the fringes keeping a studied watch over diners and their every need.

The food: is almost exactly like JG Shanghai. In fact, the JG Tasting is identical to the NYC offering. The other tasting, the "Seasonal Tasting" is more individual to this location.

What surprised me about the menu the most is that it hasn't changed - for nearly two years. I know this only because I dug up an article I had bookmarked in the February 2005 issue of Gourmet. There is a feature section all about the new restaurants in Shanghai - including the then-recently opened 3 on the Bund complex. In his article, published months after he had dined there, the writer mentions at least two dishes that are still on the menu today - the frog legs with spring garlic soup and also the scallops, from Dalian, which are still on the menu.

I would think that JG would have changed the menu within these two years. I guess you don't fix what ain't broken.

My two guests had the JG tasting (7-courses), and because I had already had that in New York, I went for the Seasonal Tasting (6-courses) and supplemented the Egg Caviar to stay on pace. Also, as I'm not a huge fan of warm preparations of foie, I asked to exchange the foie for the scallops.

Everything was up to par, although personally, I though some of the plating and table-side saucing got a little sloppy. My only complaint on my dinner were my scallops, where were slightly more cooked than I would have liked - but certainly acceptable. I'm very finicky about scallops - I'll be the first to admit my obsession. I especially like the raisin-caper emulsion that the two ivory-coloured gems came with.

My favorite course from the Seasonal Tasting was the the lump crab salad (which is also on the a la carte menu. A generous mound of lump crab topped with shaved asparagus sat in a shallow pool of slightly sweet melon broth kicked up ten notches with a bang of mustard. When I asked Chef Johnson what kind of mustard he used, he laughed and said, "Coleman's yellow." Hey, don't knock what works. It worked.

Another highlight was my sea bass - perfectly crisped skin - elevated on a row of confit'ed golden squash sections nestled in a pool of spring garlic puree (if Chef Johnson's lurking on this site - I'd appreciate knowing what else, if anything, was in this puree). Basil broth was poured, at the table, round the fish to make a magnificent dark emerald-green moat. The fish was delicate, the sauce, saucy - the garlic and the basil broth playing together like a pestos of all pestos. This was great.

For desserts: I had had the chocolate tasting, so I let one of my guests, who adores chocolate have at it. My other guest chose the "Summer" tasting, which left me with "Passionfruit." None of us were disappointed... least of which me, as my dining companions had gorged themselves full and I got half of each of their desserts. I loved every single iced treat that came - and interesting ones too: Sichuan pepper ice cream, white peach sorbet, cacao bean ice cream, and my favorite - a white pepper sorbet shocked with fragrant orange blossom. (But nothing beats my tried-true prune armanac ice cream at JG NYC).

From my passionfruit tasting, my favorite was an unlikely banana flambe tart - I'm not a huge banana fan, unless, of course you pair it with chocolate and drizzle it with passionfruit. :raz: I also had no trouble helping my guest finish her Vietnamese coffee Liegeois - think Vientmanese coffee (essentially espresso with sweetened condensed milk) with chocolate cream hit with a shot of liquor (was that vodka? Borghetti? Ricardi? Kahlua?). Who needs a straw... let's do shots!

I got a chance to chat with Chef Johnson before I left. He's a very humble man - and helpful too! He gave excellent suggestions (though I had no time to put them to good use) for local eats. He's trained all over the world at some of the finest kitchens - lucky guy. I hope him continued success at JG Shanghai, and wherever he might go in the future! :wink:

The view was spectacular. SPECTACULAR. Diners who are lucky enough to get a window table have a breathtaking view overlooking the Bund out onto Pudong - the "pearl" tower and the Hyatt towering off to its right. The brighltly lit shoreline - agog with flashing neon billboards and larger-than-life adverts is just electrifying (no pun intended).

I left walking on cloud nine. It was a far cry from some of the more rural meals I had on this trip - where, under oppressive heat and humidity, I was literally sweating into my food.

One note: there is a large square oil painting of two elderly people sitting with rice bowls at the entrance of the Jean Georges Shanghai. One faces it when leaving or walking down the avenue-wide hallway between the bar and the lounge. I would appreciate knowing the artist, if anyone has a clue. What I would give for that painting!!

You can see all of my food photos and read my commentary here on my flickr account. Click on the individual photos for a larger view and to see notes/comments.

I will also be posting these pictures later when I get to the Shanghai portion of my trip on my thread about my trip to China, found here.

u.e.
“Watermelon - it’s a good fruit. You eat, you drink, you wash your face.”
Italian tenor Enrico Caruso (1873-1921)

ulteriorepicure.com

My flickr account

ulteriorepicure@gmail.com