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Individual/Mini Cheesecakes

Dessert

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128 replies to this topic

#121 Lisa Shock

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Posted 03 February 2014 - 12:16 AM

3 1/8" is the most common small board, available from a lot of vendors in gold or silver and sometimes white. You could make the fit a bit better by pipping a border around the base of each cake.



#122 Franci

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 11:38 AM

No, no. Don't make round and cut square . . . too much waste. You can make cheesecakes in a square pan and then cut bites or bars the size you want. Check out my caramel cheesecake squares in the eGRA.

 

Hi, I'm bringing this up because I'd like to make a NY style cheese cake and cut into bite size. I have guests over for dinner on Saturday and Sunday so, I could do this in advance and have part of the dessert ready for both dinners.

 

I'm not a cheesecake expert, 10 years have passed since I made one...I'd like to go with something simple, I was thinking of the American Test Kitchen recipe which I found on line. It calls for a 9 inch pan. I have a Pyrex rectangular dish about 7x11 and then a bigger one. But I don't want to make a larger batch.

What if I cut the round cheesecake with cookie cutters? I knonw, a little bit of waste. I just realized my cookie cutters are not tall enough. I only have round rings appropriate for this.

And if I cook in the pyrex the sides are not straight anyway, so some waste is going to happen also there. I don't like the idea to portion the cake in slices and present it already cut.

Any difference in cooking temperatures and time if using glass?

 

Thanks



#123 Smithy

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 02:52 PM

Franci, do you mean the ATK recipe calls for a 9 inch diameter (round) pan, or a 9x9 square pan? If 9x9 then your 7x11 pan will only be slightly smaller area, and the cheesecake only slightly thicker. If they're specifying a 9 inch diameter pan, that only has an area of 63.5 square inches, compared to your small pan's 77 square inches. Your cheesecake will be 21% thinner. Will that be acceptable?

Sorry I'm coming up with fresh questions instead of answers. (And no, I don't know how to compensate for the differences.) :-)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#124 Franci

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Posted 19 June 2014 - 05:58 PM

Thank you Smithy, I was referring to the recipe calling for the 9 inch round pan.

I was thinking I also have 6 rings, 75 mm diameter (about 3 inches), maybe  bigger than I'd like,  and reading from this thread I got the idea that a big cake texture is better than the texture you could get from small cheese cakes if you are not careful...so, I'm not sure which way to go but the rings would be convenient.

With the same formula I could get about 9-10 rings. Could I make the filling and refrigerate  the unused portion, while the first batch is cooking and cooling? If I cover the sides of the rings with parchment strips, I don't have to freeze the cheese cakes and just cook and unmold, maybe 20 minutes for that diameter, just guessing.


Edited by Franci, 19 June 2014 - 05:59 PM.


#125 Franci

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 01:00 PM

So, I ended up using a 8x8 inch pan with removable bottom that I had. It's not very tall, so I ended up cutting the filling in half, and I'll cut up very small squares.

image.jpg

Problem is that I have an ancient chamber stove it just doesn't go to very low temperatures but keeps the heat for very long. I put the cake in at 400 f from my thermometer and turned off the heat...I'll check in half an hour (total 1 1/2 hours). I hope is going to work

#126 Franci

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:11 PM

I managed to cook the cheesecake with my oven turned off. After 1hr 15 minutes the oven temperature was 90 C. The cake didn't brown but the temperature in the middle was 67-68 C (154 F). So it worked great! I spare you what happened later and how I ruined it...

image.jpg

#127 Smithy

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 09:26 PM

Oh, c'mon, you can't leave us hanging like that!

Anyway: I'll bet that even if it looked bad (which I doubt) the taste was irresistible, and there were no leftovers. :-)

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#128 Franci

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 05:48 PM

Smithy, it still worked out, even if I dropped the cake on the table...I'm so glad I halved the filling because it would have been too much.
This, with the ugly un trimmed piece, is my plate



image.jpg

#129 Smithy

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:21 PM

Franci, you could invite me to your table any time, and I promise I wouldn't need a blindfold to enjoy it.   :laugh:  Those look beautiful, and I'll bet they tasted even better than they look!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown






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