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Individual/Mini Cheesecakes

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128 replies to this topic

#91 JFLinLA

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Posted 08 May 2007 - 09:31 PM

Let me be the 3rd one to chime in on the freeze method. Thaw slightly, dip knife in hot water and wipe between slices. Makes for a messy towel and pitcher of water but really nice clean slices. Oh, and for a really clean look, don't forget to trip the edges of your square or rectangle before slicing -- the cook gets to eat the scraps . . . yum.
So long and thanks for all the fish.

#92 JeanneCake

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 02:40 AM

I also agree on the cutting frozen/hot wet blade method if you're using the 9x13 pan to bake in.

If you're set on having round ones, I'd use the Flexipans or a similar silicone pan. I used to use my mini-muffin pans for this, but it was such a hassle to unmold, I stopped. If you use a no-bake recipe, fill the silicone and freeze, then pop them out onto a cookie round or tart shell if I want to have a dripping topping... otherwise bake as usual, freeze and go.

#93 Mr. Delicious

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Posted 09 May 2007 - 10:25 AM

People always ask me to make mini cheesecakes, I usually refuse citing the "quality loss" I usually just cut my round cheesecakes into squares and serve in a ramekin or muffin liner. I think individual ones are always overcooked and never look good. I use a cheeseblocker to cut them, I will never use a knife again.

#94 JFLinLA

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Posted 10 May 2007 - 08:17 PM

People always ask me to make mini cheesecakes, I usually refuse citing the "quality loss"  I usually just cut my round cheesecakes into squares and serve in a ramekin or muffin liner.  I think individual ones are always overcooked and never look good.  I use a cheeseblocker to cut them, I will never use a knife again.

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No, no. Don't make round and cut square . . . too much waste. You can make cheesecakes in a square pan and then cut bites or bars the size you want. Check out my caramel cheesecake squares in the eGRA.
So long and thanks for all the fish.

#95 Truffle Guy

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 03:00 AM

I am doing more dessert minis and am looking for the best way to do cheesecake minis. I've tried cutting a 9x13 pan into squares, but I don't get a nice clean cut. I've tried the mini cupcake pan with papers but I don't like how it looks. I tried a bigger cupcake pan yesterday and may remove the papers...they sank and cracked however. I really need some good tips to make some beautiful little minis.  Pictures would be great also...and recipes! 

Thanks a bunch!

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I bought some mini-cheesecake pans and they work fine but the do cook more quickly as they are much smaller.

What I've found works very well is to make a normal cheesecake in a 9x13 pan and then freeze and cut with cookie cutters. You will have some waste but can minimize that with a good cutting plan. What you get in return are pieces that look as though they were made to order not just cut with a knife. You can then decorate each one to further accentuate the individual nature. If the sides are not as clean as you like you can always dip in chocolate, icing or roll in nuts or another coating. I've not done these for a couple years but I still have people ask me about them all the time and even had a couple restaurants request I supply them. Personally, I love cheesecake but think they tend to be served in too large a portion and this is a great way to allow people to not be overwhelmed by too large a piece or you can create a sampler platter with several flavors which is what I always did.

#96 miladyinsanity

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 04:10 AM

I make them in a 9 by 9, and it seems to work fine. Very nice cuts too, if you wipe in between slices--I didn't need the hot water trick.
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#97 aidensnd

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Posted 11 May 2007 - 08:55 PM

Silicone pans work great for mini cheesecakes. There are a bunch of different shapes to choose from and you can pop them right into the freezer and then the cakes unmold perfectly.

#98 bripastryguy

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 06:43 AM

At my shop we use the silicon molds for everything, mini cheesecakes come out perfect. Real short cooking time, chill to room temp, pop in the freezer overnite come in next day and unmold. They come out perfect.
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#99 DragonflyDesserts

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 08:25 AM

"What I've found works very well is to make a normal cheesecake in a 9x13 pan and then freeze and cut with cookie cutters. You will have some waste but can minimize that with a good cutting plan. What you get in return are pieces that look as though they were made to order not just cut with a knife. You can then decorate each one to further accentuate the individual nature. If the sides are not as clean as you like you can always dip in chocolate, icing or roll in nuts or another coating."

Love the nut idea and coating the edges... and plan to make little dipped ones. I tried the freezing method and will not do it any other way from now on. It seems so obvious now, don't know why I never thought of it before.

Another question...when you all do minis, do you always put each piece on a little doily or something? How big should a mini be...1 bite and a pricing question...I know it will vary, I am in the midwest. How much would you charge per each. I feel I am a low right now. I only box them, not tray them and they are 4 for $3.00. I don't mind being a little low now as I am learning but want to stay competitive and not underprice myself. THanks!
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#100 CaliPoutine

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Posted 14 May 2007 - 08:40 AM

I've seen a 12-cup pan especially for mini cheesecakes; it has a removable bottom for each straight-sided cup. Haven't seen it in action though.

http://www.amazon.co...e/dp/B0006SJZJ8

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I use this pan( not this exact pan, something similar). Here is a pic.( ignore the canned cherries, that is what the client wanted).

Posted Image Yesterday at work, I made cheesecake bars( no pic). I cut then in 12 squares( 13 x 9 pan) and then each square into a triangle.

I used a hot knife, they came out like a dream.

#101 gfron1

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:22 AM

I'm bumping this topic because I'm making 100 mini cheesecakes for a fundraiser this weekend. I am going to use a 2" cone silicone mold for the shape (like what bripastryguy suggests). My concern is that cheesecake batter puffs and falls often times. Does anyone have a recipe that is more stable, or suggestions for preventing this problem? I like Craig Claiborne's recipe typically but I've never used it for minis. I don't want to give them nuggets because of a fallen cake.

Thanks

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#102 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:57 AM

For our niece's wedding I also did 65 individual cheesecakes so I contacted bripastryguy for tips. I didn't have a silicone mold or the money to get one so I used waterchestnut cans with the top and bottom taken out. Not 65, only 12 and made one batch a night and froze them. They were about 3-1/4". A couple of his tips were to not make them thicker than 1-1/2" thick and to bake them at about 275F. This temperature worked great, even for the larger "wedding" cake. They didn't rise or puff or crack. I used a sheet pan of water on the lower shelf.
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#103 alanamoana

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 09:46 AM

I'm bumping this topic because I'm making 100 mini cheesecakes for a fundraiser this weekend.  I am going to use a 2" cone silicone mold for the shape (like what bripastryguy suggests).  My concern is that cheesecake batter puffs and falls often times.  Does anyone have a recipe that is more stable, or suggestions for preventing this problem?  I like Craig Claiborne's recipe typically but I've never used it for minis.  I don't want to give them nuggets because of a fallen cake.

Thanks

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cheesecake puffs and falls usually because it is overbaked (it is the eggs that cause it to souffle). the idea is to pull them out of the oven when they still jiggle in the middle slightly (like a creme brulee). as a cheesecake is merely a baked custard, it will continue to set up out of the oven. this is harder when you're baking something so small. because it is in a silicone mold, you might be able to bake them in a water bath. but they definitely need to be frozen to unmold from the pan.

good luck!

#104 sugarseattle

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 09:37 PM

yep, it's totally overbaking! I usually pull my cheesecake when I start to see that halo forming and there's a little jiggly action. There was one theory shooting around that cheesecake also rises and falls because of overbeating, which is easy to do b/c you're usually trying really hard to get the lumps out. good planning in the order of your ingredients will help.

i use the cooks illustrated cheesecake recipe. I love it; however, I also like the one on the philly box...it's only like 3-4 ingredients and it's pretty darned good.

when i'm cutting a full sheet, I usually try to work really fast and I can get it done before the edges start to thaw, but on hot days, I cut the whole bugger in half and work on half at a time. a little rosette of whipped cream does absolute wonders for redirecting your eye away from any slightly marred edges, and yes, I plop them into little paper cups...makes them easier to handle at parties and such.

Oh, and one more thing, a very thin cheap knife seems to work the best. I got my cheesecake cutter at goodwill for 99cents.

Edited by sugarseattle, 19 September 2007 - 09:38 PM.

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#105 gfron1

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 12:38 PM

The jiggle test works except when you're out walking your dogs and don't get back in time for jiggling duty! Batch one will be slightly overcooked, but they're still edible. I'll watch more closely on batch two in the morning. Thanks for the advice everyone.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#106 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 20 September 2007 - 01:59 PM

The jiggle test works except when you're out walking your dogs and don't get back in time for jiggling duty!  Batch one will be slightly overcooked, but they're still edible.  I'll watch more closely on batch two in the morning.  Thanks for the advice everyone.

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If you had a good idea of how long it takes you could always set your oven to turn off and just leave them in the oven to cool and set.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#107 gfron1

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 09:21 PM

Here's what I learned from you all - I've always overbaked my cheesecakes. SugarSeattle - I owe you big! I pulled with just a hint of jiggle. These were a huge success. I made them for our local women's fiber art guild - passionfruit cheese cake, sprayed with white chocolate, tinted with Chef Rubber Aztec Orange. Thanks everyone for the help.
Posted Image
Posted Image
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#108 K8memphis

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 03:01 AM

Wow, Rob, those are so cool.

Maybe it's just the picture but stick in a little stem* on top and spray them green with a soft red blush and you could make pears.

*A clove would work or a chocolate stem & leaf would rock.

#109 gfron1

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 06:15 AM

Now that I've invested in a sprayer that I can't use for anything but food I'll have to start playing more. eGullet will be seeing quite a bit of sprayed foods from me in the upcoming year :)

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#110 alanamoana

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 12:53 PM

rob, i have to say those cheesecakes are some of the most elegant desserts you've made so far! i admit, i'm a fan of clean, simple lines and that's what i love best about them.

great job! :cool:

#111 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 03:33 PM

Beautiful! Did you have a crust?
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#112 gfron1

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 03:53 PM

Thanks for the kind words. No, there was no crust. They were eaten about 45 minutes after being put on the table (it was a fundraiser fashion show), which is longer than I would have liked. So at that point, and when I scarfed a damaged one right after spraying, but after it was starting to soften on our work table, neither time was their a crust. I did two full coats to ensure equal color coverage, so it wasn't quite pickable, but not gooey, slushy either. Did any of that make sense?

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#113 devlin

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Posted 10 November 2007 - 10:49 PM

Thanks for the kind words.  No, there was no crust.  They were eaten about 45 minutes after being put on the table (it was a fundraiser fashion show), which is longer than I would have liked.  So at that point, and when I scarfed a damaged one right after spraying, but after it was starting to soften on our work table, neither time was their a crust.  I did two full coats to ensure equal color coverage, so it wasn't quite pickable, but not gooey, slushy either.  Did any of that make sense?

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Do you have a good source for a food sprayer?

#114 gfron1

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 07:54 AM

HERE'S the topic that got me started on the project. I used a Wagner power painter, but that topic has much more appropriate suggestions.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#115 Tri2Cook

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Posted 11 November 2007 - 10:12 AM

Depending on the type and volume of spraying you want to do, I think the Wagner sprayers are great. Inexpensive, easy to use and, as Rob's pictures show, very nice results. If you want something for fine airbrush-style work of course it's not the right tool but for putting a coat of chocolate on things they're fine. I've never been tempted to trade mine in for a $200 - $300 (or more) upgrade but I don't use it for spraying chocolate molds or detail work.
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#116 Matthew Kirshner

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 02:43 PM

Hi everyone,

 

 I have been asked to make cheesecake cupcakes for a wedding in 6 months.  I have made large cheesecakes in the past for jobs but not cupcakes.  I have a few questions if anyone could answer:

 

1. The client wants liners, I know not to use foil liners, but would regular paper liners work without sticking to the cheesecake?

 

2.  normally I would waterbath, should I waterbath for cupcake size?  I have notice some articles and recipes they don't.

 

3.  What would be a typical temperature and time?  again I have only done big ones in large deck ovens. 

 

4.  this is more of I client preference, but any ideas for topping ex.. whipped cream, buttercream, ect.. something that can be presented on a tower. 

 

any thoughts would be helpful.

 

Thanks in advance.


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#117 Lisa Shock

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 06:08 PM

I have made mini cheesecakes in cupcake pans, the silicone ones work really well for this. I have never used liners, they pop out really easily from the silicone. (I'd recommend putting them in liners after baking, but, the product is wet, so, I'd recommend the foil liners.)

 

I have always wound up standing by the oven when I make these, to ensure they don't overcook. My recollection is that they took about 20 minutes in a convection oven at 300°F with an already-hot water bath. I don't really think you need the water bath. Traditional wisdom is that you'll get side browning without the bath, but, with silicone being such a good insulator I don't think that will occur if you choose the silicone route.

 

Can't say I have thought too much about toppings. Me personally, I'd top with fruit and glaze, like a fruit tart -work out some sort of pattern that looks like flowers or something. Or maybe, some sort of molded chocolate to perch on top. Or, fruit and chocolate. Nothing too sweet. Nothing that would get soggy, like a cookie. (I cannot imagine icing here...) If you bake a cheesecake with a (delicious) sour cream layer on top, you get a softer, pure white top to anchor things like fruit.



#118 JeanneCake

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Posted 31 January 2014 - 06:09 PM

You can bake cheesecake in cupcake pans, with paper liners in them; I'd bake them the way I do the individual ones in rings - at a low temp, like 225 or 250 a nd for a limited time (20-30 minutes, checking at the 20 minute mark).   When I bake the individual rings, i don't use a waterbath (I'm using a convection oven and I turn the heat down to 225 and turn the pan a lot).   It's easier to get them out of the pan if you bake in liners.

 

If you bake in cupcake pans, you can place those pans in a sheet pan of water to simulate a water bath if your recipe works better that way. 

 

You could also bake a sheet of cheesecake and then cut the sheet into rings (or triangles, or what have you)  that will fit your paper liners, and if you want a more secure footing, you can place the cut circles onto cookie bases.  I bake off half-sheets (because I make cheesecake pops) and if I am feeling very self assured, I'll bake at 300 for 35 minutes having poured 6 pounds of batter into the pan (using a pan extender).  It's 250 for a little bit longer if there's lots of "stuff" (like oreos, heath bar, other cookie types like Girl Scout Samoas) - I am also modifying the recipe to make a firmer, denser cheesecake that can withstand rolling.



#119 Matthew Kirshner

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 11:26 AM

After speaking with the client recently, she inform me of no liners.  Now I have to figure out a way to present the cheesecakes on a tower, I was thinking of gold boards but I don't think they make small enough ones. Does anyone know where I could find any?



#120 Pam R

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Posted 02 February 2014 - 12:33 PM

I've ordered small rounds and squares from Qualita Paper.  The minimums may be too much for you (I think it's says 1000, but I honestly don't think I had to order that many -- but it's been years.)  I think they make them from 1 1/2" and up. 







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