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Chocolate ideas

Chocolate

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54 replies to this topic

#31 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 04:54 PM

Boo hoo. I'm upset that no one has congratulated me on my idea that Verbena-NZ should make a Tunnel of Fudge Cake. I think it is a fabulous idea and I even included a link and no one is validating me. :sad:

:raz: :laugh: :wink:

#32 tan319

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 07:05 PM

Ms.Kate,
In the 'passion' debate, I believe I said that "sometimes" you appear to lack passion about school and cooking. That was based on what came thru via your posts. I know it's easy to mistake someone's mindset reading a thread. I got that feeling from reading a lot of your stuff.
But, enough of that.
School is tough. I hated going to culinary school at first. I NEVER liked school of any sort much past 7th grade and when I found myself in culinary school, in my 30's, I felt like crap. Very shy, in a way,afraid of screwing things up, the teacher knew I knew a lot about food but kind of liked intimidating me. It changed about 3 months in. I got confidence, got rid of my shyness and actually ended up doing pretty well.
If you haven't decided to drop out, don't let the teachers bug you. They are perhaps preparing you for life out there, and even if you're a personal chef, there will always be conflict.
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#33 msfurious1

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 07:37 PM

click
Here~
Somebody try this~

I've never posted before, but this sounds intriguing. It has to better than "tunnel of fudge cake.
:laugh:


Edited cause I'm stupid

Edited by msfurious1, 25 October 2003 - 07:44 PM.


#34 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 08:25 PM

Ms. Perlow...your a HOOT! Let me be the first to tell you how much I enjoyed your thinking!

Msfurious1, the recipe you posted is a molten cake. LOVE- LOVE your edited message note....if you wouldn't mind I'd like to borrow it from time to time-seeing how I have the affliction, please?


edited because-I don't really care enough to stuggle thru any rebuttle responses.

Edited by Sinclair, 25 October 2003 - 08:57 PM.


#35 KateW

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Posted 25 October 2003 - 08:54 PM

Hmm, interesting words on feelings I have not even considered.
Rachel, I think you are one of those "more respected" members who perhaps does not need validation. I on the other hand am weak and needing of approval.
Some of you have touched on some issues of mine that are perhaps beyond the call of duty on this particular board.
I don't want to be a personal chef so I can live in a bubble--I want to be one so I can work on my own, and for other reasons based on how I work and time constraints and such. Blah blah blah.

#36 Verbena-NZ

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 05:04 AM

Boo hoo. I'm upset that no one has congratulated me on my idea that Verbena-NZ should make a Tunnel of Fudge Cake. I think it is a fabulous idea and I even included a link and no one is validating me.  :sad:

:raz:  :laugh:  :wink:

I'll be trying it out tommorow morning :biggrin:

Thank you so very much, shame more people here aren't as forward as offering their ideas and links to recipes.

Once again :biggrin: THANK YOU :biggrin:

#37 chefette

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 05:49 AM

I have tried the Chocolate Wave Cake at Disney (don't know if this recipe will really reproduce it or not) but it is GREAT!!!!!!!! I love it.

Well, it is really togh to figure out what makes anything more'ish (like the scottish moors? sort of wuthering heights hahahahah)

Verbena - the link I gave you previously provides probably the most reliable best recipe I have used for liquid vcenter cocolate cakes

maybe your search and connect function isn't working so here. This was posted by Steve Klc on the thread I directed you to. It is unquestionably excellent but performance is up to you.

Track down the Food Arts July/August 2000 issue for a charming, well-written piece on Philippe with a few recipes. Then there was that NY Times six part series which you probably saw. But by far the best source of info and current recipes by Philippe is the Thuries magazine issue #132 from September 2001--14 big full color pages, incredible photographs, with his real recipes. By real recipes I mean if his typical dessert has 11 components--in Thuries he gives you all 11 recipes and methods. His chocolate moelleux is in there:
125 g 70% chocolate
120 g butter
1 yolk
2 eggs
90 g sugar
120 g flour
you melt the chocolate and butter, combine the yolks, sugar, flour
then sir the chocolate into the egg mix now whipping. Makes a nice elastic shiny batter, important to pipe it into the preapred molds while it is still warm 3/4 of the way ensuring that you get good even bottom and side coating. Pipe it in don't spoon since the batter may pile and result in gaps.

You need aluminum molds, the batter must be chilled before baking, you need to be quite precise in removing it from the oven. Because of the liquid center you need to let them set up a few minutes before taking out of the tins. Good idea to put them in the walk in or freezer to stop cooking. They should slip right out of the tins, you can hold or freeze them then warm over steam or in a microwave for service. Getting the right rewarming is also important so that they are squishy and liquidy when served. They are incredibly boring served alone (in my opinion) but make a great chocolatey center of a plated dessert.

Or try this:

10oz unsweetened chocolate melted with 1 pound butter
combine and fold into slightly cooled chocolate:
1/2t salt
18 yolks

Whip to soft peak and fold in
8 oz sugar
6 oz whites
Pipe into buttered rings (3") on silpat or parchment lined trays and chill
They can be baked to order temp depends on your oven - we did them in a Deck oven at about 400 the need to be unmolded and served immediately.

Or try Jacques Torres Chocolate Fondant
260g unsalted butter
500g bittersweet chocolate
50g dutch process cocoa powder
pinch salt
160g egg whites
25g meringue powder
100g sugar

butter and sugar 3 oz aluminum molds and heat oven to 400 (again depends on oven type (Convection, deck, normal)
melt butter and chocolate
add cocoa powder and salt
whip whites to stiff peak with the meringue powder and sugar
fold into chocolate
pipe into molds 3/4 full freeze thaw 2 hours prior to baking and bake

Serve immediately . It is frequently useful to sort of add to the liquidity of the center by injecting it with a warm chocolate sauce

Now there are three recipes that work - in different ways. If you have tried several recipes that are not working it could be your technique. It is important to use metal molds, it is vital that the batter be cold when it enters the oven, it is critical to use a very hot oven, and the baking time be monitored since the mold size, oven performance, and going in temp of the batter affect baking time. One batch may take 5-6 minutes while another is done in 3. You have to be on top of these things and need to take action to stop the baking.

The ones Steve wrote about are the only ones that I have worked with that bake well in advance and rewarm with excellent results.

What are you planning on serving this with? Stand alone or part of a more complex plating? For your normal dessert service or for a special event?

Edited by chefette, 26 October 2003 - 05:54 AM.


#38 chefette

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 05:57 AM

Kate - just get over it. School is great. It is the most fun easy part of your cooking life. People here have been really nice to you, supportive, understanding and helpful. They have put alot of energy into wishing you well and onward.

#39 KateW

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 07:00 AM

I have so much left to say, and no idea how to say it, so I will just get over it. And no, I will not quit cooking school. I have two cooking labs, one trimester of academics and a trimester of externship (God help us). Perhaps I can find a nice job making salads. Oh wait, I screw that up too. But I'm over it. :biggrin: Consider this subject dropped, please.

#40 tan319

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 09:51 AM

Chefette (and Steve)
I just got my copy of that Food Arts with Conticini and am waiting for my Thuries mag with him.
I love this guy, what he's about and am so kicking myself in my ass for never getting to Petrossian when I (and he) was in NYC.
Question about his Moelleux recipe. When you talk about whipping the choc butter mix into the yolk mix, are you on a Kitchen Aid or doing by hand?
I also have those NYTimes articles with Conticini and am trying a variation on the brownie he does there.
It say's "Swiss meringue" and then describes a meringue made with confectioner sugar but not heated over a bain marie. It's my impression that Swiss meringue is egg whites and the sugar combined and then heated over a bain, then whipped to volume,etc.. That's how I do it.
Can you verify?
And thanks for posting more stuff. Awesome.
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#41 chefette

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 02:28 PM

I don't know about the recipe in the magazine, but in my experience no whipping, just stirring or simple stirring with a whisk. Its really really simple. I do the sugar flour mix in one bowl, combine the chocolate, butter, egg, and stir it into the sugar flour (kind of like how you would mix the egg into the sugar starch mix for a pastry cream. Pipe into the greased aluminum tins. Its a fairly liquid batter when its fresh warm so you need to clip the bag closed or start with a disposable non cut bag. You do not want to let the batter chill before piping. If you have to cycle through a set of tins, its really better to just do enough in a batch to fill the tins and then prep another batch while the first is cooling slightly. Very simple. Rewarming strategy all depends on service type and pace and available equipment.

Nice results. If I was going to add somethingf it would be a pinch of salt or so. I miss that in this cake.

Edited by chefette, 26 October 2003 - 02:33 PM.


#42 tan319

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 08:25 PM

but in my experience no whipping, just stirring or simple stirring with a whisk. Its really really simple. I do the sugar flour mix in one bowl, combine the chocolate, butter, egg, and stir it into the sugar flour (kind of like how you would mix the egg into the sugar starch mix for a pastry cream.


Cool. That's how I've done it, as far as the stirring goes.
I didn't pipe, I poured. I didn't notice any gaps, just the timing is SO hit and miss. But it was fairly goey. It just never pours out of the cake like say, the Jean George Vongrichten (?) pictures always look.
RE: Salt. I'm always using it to bring my flavours up, in everything.
I made a chocolate panna cotta the other day and found it a bit flat and a pinch of salt put it right there.
Thanks for the tips! :biggrin:
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#43 Blake

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Posted 26 October 2003 - 09:55 PM

One very low key chocolate dessert are biscotti. Do a search for Double Chocolate Chunk Biscotti or E-mail me and I will convert and post a recipe here.

#44 chefette

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Posted 27 October 2003 - 09:10 AM

So Verbena - give us feedback on what you ended up doing, why, and how it worked out.

#45 Verbena-NZ

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Posted 27 October 2003 - 12:26 PM

So Verbena - give us feedback on what you ended up doing, why, and how it worked out.

Don't worry..I will be.

Should be writting a little more within the next 24 hours :biggrin:

#46 tan319

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 07:59 PM

Chefette, et al,
Tried the molten cake, la Conticini, recipe again today.
Worked better, but still needs to be perfected.
Too gooshy, sides too thin.
I micro-ed for 20 seconds, it came out a bit..deflated :angry:
But that's cool, I'll get it. :biggrin:
Thanks for the tips, much improved.
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#47 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 09:38 PM

Your description Ted was your cakes underbaked...and microwaving it won't bake it only heat it. I swear/promise all you have to do is a timing test and you'll nail these. In fact you MUST do a timing test cause every oven is different.

#48 tan319

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 09:54 PM

Your description Ted was your cakes underbaked...and microwaving it won't bake it only heat it. I swear/promise all you have to do is a timing test and you'll nail these. In fact you MUST do a timing test cause every oven is different.

Thanks, Sinclair.
That is indeed what I'm attempting.
Today was at 4 minutes. 375 in a convection, load high.
Shocked in an ice bath, as my walk in never feels cold enough to me.
Then stored in the walk in to cool completely.
After I mic-ed, as I said the cake didn't so much deflate as collapse. And it looked like the cake was baking thru up ( I unmolded it to a plate to warm, so up was bottom and vice versa)
Do you think I should bake till top is 'sealed' looking, or still a bit shimmery?
Thanks for your input.
Going to go look back at chefettes post about baking these.
Oh, I did hit it with a bit of Fleur de Sel. And I'm using Valrhona 70 % Guanaja (sic?)
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#49 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 10:05 PM

4 minute is definately not long enough if your using a 2.5 to 3" ring (the batter I use takes about 7 to 8). Yes, the top must be set/sealed -thats your hint- I go just like a minute or two past that. I think you need to go up to 400f.

And another devil about these things is a full oven of them won't bake great (although Colleen told me the recipe from 4seasons does bake well in quantity). You always get the one on the sides of your pans over baking before the center ones, even in a convection.

#50 tan319

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 10:10 PM

4 minute is definately not long enough if your using a 2.5 to 3" ring (the batter I use takes about 7 to 8). Yes, the top must be set/sealed -thats your hint- I go just like a minute or two past that. I think you need to go up to 400f.

And another devil about these things is a full oven of them won't bake great (although Colleen told me the recipe from 4seasons does bake well in quantity). You always get the one on the sides of your pans over baking before the center ones, even in a convection.

I did 4 of them today, the recipe as it reads, as to not waste anything,and , my oven being semi crappy (uneven), had the under/overbake syndrome. I'm using 4 oz. aluminum molds, utility cups they're called.
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#51 FistFullaRoux

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Posted 29 October 2003 - 11:31 AM

I just had a small wrapped candy. They're in a big bowl here in the office, and if I find the person who put it there, I'm going to hug them, then slap them. Evil person. I'll be bouncing in place for the next couple of hours. My head will be on the desk by 5.

Anyway, it was a Nestle Creamy Caramel Coffin. Basically a caramel filled chocolate piece. But the caramel, when tasted by itself, was far saltier than I would have imagined it would be. Not unpleasant - it reminds me of butterscotch. All together, an enjoyable piece of candy, but I was a little taken aback by the saltiness.

And unless I'm imagining things, there is a subtle spicy aftertaste. Back of the throat. Like cayenne, maybe.

Maybe this will give you some inspiration. A salty, spicy, yet not overseasoned caramel paired with an everyday milk chocolate. I don't think it would work with dark, unless you were to layer 2 caramels, one spicy and one not, within a darker chocolate.
Screw it. It's a Butterball.

#52 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 09 November 2003 - 10:15 PM

Where ya been Verbena? are you a hit and run or a participant?

#53 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 12 November 2003 - 10:05 PM

Where ya been Verbena? are you a hit and run or a participant?

again......

#54 tan319

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Posted 13 November 2003 - 08:32 PM

Where ya been Verbena? are you a hit and run or a participant?

again......

I think V-NZ cut and ran...
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#55 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 14 November 2003 - 07:47 AM

I think so too Tan. It was brought to my attention that he's posted similar threads-been rude, posing as a housewife when in fact he owns a restaurant.....
......so I thought I'd double check. Shoot me if I try to help him again.





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