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Korean Namul and Banchan


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#31 jschyun

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 01:00 PM

you mean kong jang? eunny jang is spot on.

Honestly, I hate to admit this, but I'm one of lazy people that goes to the deli and buys it, or eats it if someone else makes it. I didn't realize this was for black soybeans. Actually, I never thought about what bean goes in there, but it's definitely a small roundish black bean, that you can find in any Korean market. If you have seen adzuki beans, I think they're about the same size.

the lone english recipe for kong jang (soy sauce marinated black beans)

there's a lot of subtle variations in the Korean recipes but I don't have the time to translate them.

one with pics (korean though)

Edited by jschyun, 22 September 2004 - 01:32 PM.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#32 torakris

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 02:49 PM

these sound just like the Japanese kuromame (black bean):
http://www.nsknet.or...cipe/007_e.html

these are made with either black soybeans or a larger, flatter black bean and it most commonly served at new year's festivities.

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#33 lperry

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 03:17 PM

This is interesting. I have never heard of a "drop lid." I assume this is to promote even cooking? Also, what's up with the old nail? :huh:

#34 melonpan

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Posted 22 September 2004 - 06:18 PM

YUM!

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double YUM! here too. one of my favourites
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#35 torakris

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Posted 23 September 2004 - 04:05 AM

This is interesting.  I have never heard of a "drop lid."  I assume this is to promote even cooking?  Also, what's up with the old nail? :huh:

View Post


The old nail is to blacken the color of the beans, as for teh drop lid I actually have never thought about it, but it is used in the majority of simmered dishes, I have just started a new thread just on the drop lid:

http://forums.egulle...showtopic=51996

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#36 jschyun

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Posted 23 September 2004 - 09:38 PM

Oh geez, I just read that English recipe and realized it called for a pound of beans. That's a lot of kong jang! Obviously you don't want to make that much on your first try.

Here's a quick and somewhat crappy translation of the korean recipe. Not as nice as melonpan's but oh well.

Kong Jang Recipe 2(Soy Sauce Marinated Beans)

Ingredients: 1 cup black soy beans, 2 Tblspns raw sesame seeds, 2 cups water.

Sauce Ingredients: 5 Tblspns soy sauce, 2 Tblspn rice wine (aka mirin), 1 Tblspn sugar, 1 Tblspn corn syrup, a little sesame oil (I will guess 1/4 tsp)

1. Soak the black beans for about 5 hrs.

2. When the skins have started to split, rinse the beans a bunch of times. You don't necessarily want to get the skins off though. You want chewy beans with nice dark brown, shiny yet wrinkly skins.

3. In a pan (the pic has a cute aluminum pan) put the 2 cups water, beans and boil until about halfway done. (As mentioned, the eventual product is supposed to be chewy, not cooked through like baked beans.)

4. Okay then you mix together the sauce stuff: soy sauce, cooking wine, sugar, malt syrup.

5. When the beans are about half cooked, throw in the sauce you just mixed in #4 and cook for about 15 minutes and make sure a lot of steam comes out of the beans and the liquid in the pan reduces down as much as possible. The eventual beans are pretty dry, so I would reduce down a lot. However, you also want to make sure the beans don't overcook and get mushy.

6. once steam is coming off and the liquid is pretty much reduced, splash in a little sesame oil. and throw in the sesame seeds.

Cool the beans down in the fridge. I guess you could eat them hot, but I never have. (Can you tell I have never made these? I'm telling you, I'm LAZY) Personally, I don't like to eat these cold, but you definitely have to cool them down so that sauce coats the beans and you get that sticky quality. I think the malt syrup is what makes the beans shiny and so nicely sticky. No need for an old nail. Very addictive.

Oh, and a drop lid just seems like a generic pot lid. I'm sure you can use a regular pot lid with exactly the same results.

------------------EDIT-------------------------

--#2 changed line from "when skins are sort of coming off" to "when skins have started to split"

--also I don't think you should use a lid for this recipe. As you can see in the pic, no lid is used, and also you want to rapidly reduce the liquid in the pot.

--edited sauce ingred list to make more clear

--the moolyut is corn syrup not the malt syrup I was thinking of. it's corn syrup

Edited by jschyun, 24 September 2004 - 09:15 PM.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#37 lperry

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 06:39 AM

The beans are soaking. I'll report back later.

Can't wait!

#38 jschyun

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 10:11 AM

pls note the changes at the end of my last post. just some minor ones.
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#39 torakris

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 03:49 PM

do you think they could be made with out the malt sryup?
I don't think I will be able to get that without a trip to a the very far away Korean market.
Any substitutes?
I really want to try the Korean version......

I have never added a nail by the way... :biggrin:

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#40 jschyun

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 04:42 PM

I suspect any thick syrup product would work. I would be surprised if there was no thick syrup product in Japan that would do the trick.

I don't think you need it, I've seen plenty of times where the sauce is kind of watery, but I like it more viscous and sticky.

Because I feel guilty about everyone trying to make this, I think I too will make kong jang sometime this week. The things I do for you guys.

Edited by jschyun, 24 September 2004 - 04:43 PM.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#41 torakris

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 04:54 PM

actually some Japanese recipes call for mizu-ame which is a thick sweet sryup, thicker and sweeter than corn sryup. a quick look on the internet says that traditionaly it was a malt sryup but now is made with potatoes or sweet potatoes.
I have some on hand and I will give it a try, need to get the beans first though....

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#42 lperry

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 05:26 PM

YUM!

:wub: :wub: :wub:

Thank you for all the help!

-Linda

Edited to say: My next attempt at Korean food will be a Kimchee. Once again, eGullet to the rescue with the kimchee thread...

Edited by lperry, 24 September 2004 - 05:34 PM.


#43 eunny jang

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 08:42 PM

Because I feel guilty about everyone trying to make this, I think I too will make kong jang sometime this week.  The things I do for you guys.

View Post


I buy them at the store too

Note: I was talking to my mom tonight, and she mentioned that you should NEVER cover the pot - doing so will make the beans "puh-juh", which in this context, I gather she means kind of loose and mushy.

#44 melonpan

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 09:20 PM

i just would like to point out that earlier jschyun mentioned a recipe of mine but i dont think i have ever posted anything. ive made it before and ive been posting for like forever so it is possible, but...

I suspect any thick syrup product would work.

ive never cooked it with any kind of syrup. but it doesnt mean that i wont try! still, i lots of people make it without. go for it however way you wish torakris!

make the beans "puh-juh", which in this context, I gather she means kind of loose and mushy.

yeap. puhjuh means overcooked, and in any context, that means mushy beans. you do want them chewey.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#45 jschyun

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Posted 24 September 2004 - 09:21 PM

Guess what guys:

the matsul that I didn't really know about is the exact same thing as mirin. I asked at the store today and they rolled their eyes at me.

the yut (malt syrup) I was thinking of is actually corn syrup. There is another syrup that is actually malt syrup, and brown like what I was thinking of, but this recipe asks for corn syrup.

I suspect if you put in enough sugar, that would do the same thing.

And since I was at the store, I measured the black beans against the other ones and they're actually slightly bigger than adzuki beans.

see this is why melonpan does all the translations... she's more careful. :laugh:

I'll look around for other recipes.

--sugar and corn syrup do have slightly different properties sometimes. I don't know that it will make a difference here, but I bought enough beans to try both. Also, cane and beet sugar can make a difference, cane generally being superior. At least that's what I read somewhere.

Edited by jschyun, 24 September 2004 - 09:30 PM.

I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#46 lperry

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Posted 25 September 2004 - 09:33 AM

The people at the Korean grocery were really helpful. I went in with notes from you all (thanks) and they found the yut and gave me a bottle of mirin for the matsul. So I made it with the "right" ingredients.

I cooked the beans uncovered, although I do think a drop lid would have made them cook a little more evenly before the soy sauce mixture went in. This would mean less stirring = less loss of wrinkly bean skins.

The dish that I originally had in the restaurant was not so sweet and didn't have the sesame seeds. I like this one with the sticky syrup and seeds better.

#47 melonpan

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 01:06 AM

jangajji (장아찌)... vinegar/soy sauce pickles.

im a complete dope when it comes to kimchi. like a spoiled prince i know the good shit when i eat it, but i couldnt make any to save my life.

but jangajji i can manage. and so can you. yes, YOU.

typically, jangajji contains onions and cukes and daikon (muu), but you can stick whatever you want in there. what have i seen? eggplant, nappa cabbage, various roots (like doraji and deodeok), garlic sprouts, perilla leaves, korean put (poot) chiles... mom loves her garlic jalapeno jangajji...

since i last drove down with moms schtuff last april, we have run low again at the apt. ive been eating ochazuke like theres no tomorrow lately and that certainly hasnt helped. time to make some more...

the raw ingredients. i ended up adding one more onion to what is pictured here.

about twenty jalapenos, an onion, a daikon root, about 8 pickling cukes, some stalks of leftover celery and two pounds of garlic cloves :wub: gotta have tons of garlic to eat!
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

heres chopping up the jalapenos:
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...15janga02.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>
i dont get rid of the seeds. i like the heat. and pickled, its not so hot.

some people slice the cukes lengthwise, or even leave them whole. but i like them in nice banchan sized pieces. thick chunky chunks.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

these garlic cloves were large. i tended to cut them up. mom leaves them whole. some people pickle the whole head which makes for pretty presentations, but i hate digging in and cutting up the stuff when i want to eat. slicing off the tops of the cloves is also optional.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

my muu (daikon) also gets the chunk treatment:
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...15janga07.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

the onions, i like in smaller bits. they tend to be saltier, more vinegarier so i make them smaller than the other veggies.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...15janga09.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

didnt take pics of the celery, but i think you get the picture.

ive dumped the veggies into whatever jars i had available. i came up short so i chopped up one more small onion...
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

now the boring prep crap is over and done with and the fun pouring begins... pour in vinegar to cover all the veggies completely.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

some of the veggies float, so my mom puts a large smooth rock she found on some beach years ago on top. it looks really cool. i havent found any yet. so i usually put a plastic lid from another kimchi jar inside the other jars (which you can just make out). you dont actually need to do this, but i sleep better knowing that all the bits are definitely drowned and beyond saving.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

two days after starting i saw some really great carrots and decided to add them to two of the pots.
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

its now about a week and a half since i started and heres what the large pot looks like today...
<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

i had some time tonight so i decided to post this... but we are still not done. maybe another two, three weeks before they are ready.

perusing online and looking at other jangajji recipes, i see that soaking orders and durations vary greatly. some people salt their veggies with salt (i do not. i use soy sauce). some people soak only for 3 days... lotsa different things. some people keep their jangajjis pure in the sense that they keep veggies separate. a cucumber jangajji in this small jar, a garlic only on there and a perilla leaf one here...

its like kimchi, a wild country. youre free to do what you like. as long as it works, no one will complain.

this is basically my moms recipe.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#48 melonpan

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 01:14 AM

oh yeah, i wanted to add that sometimes the garlic turns green or blue. theres some chemical reason for this, but it doesnt always happen. its not such a big deal with this recipe because you end up soaking this stuff in soy sauce and then you cant see the blue or the greens.

but in other western pickles, i guess it can be unappetizing and ive read that people blanch their garlic to help prevent this.

this time, the garlic did not change color, so shoot, i couldnt take any freaky photos.. oh well. im sure you can imagine anyway....
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#49 torakris

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Posted 15 October 2004 - 04:07 PM

a couple of questions

what kind of vinegar did you use?
do you add the soy sauce after removing?

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#50 melonpan

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Posted 16 October 2004 - 12:43 AM

a couple of questions

what kind of vinegar did you use?
do you add the soy sauce  after removing?

i use the plain vinegar, not cider or rice. but you can actually use any kind of vinegar. looking at other recipes online, there are people who use rice and cider.

the soy sauce my mom adds in this fashion:

after the veggies have soaked for two weeks in vinegar, you dump out all the vinegar, then you soak the veggies in soy sauce for two weeks. then youre done. you take small amounts (a small jarful) and mix in sugar to taste for that small batch. the soy sauce mixture thats left behind is excelent for dipping in meats (from gomtang, seolleongtang, etc)...

i should have posted the recipe from the first posting. i wasnt really thinking. anyway, better late than never.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#51 melonpan

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Posted 19 October 2004 - 09:39 PM

buchu jeon (부추전)
garlic chive pancake

ingredients
<b>2 bunches garlic chives (buchu)
1 handful shrimp, clam or oyster meat (optional)
3/4 cup flour
3 tablespoons mochiko (sweet rice flour)
3 eggs
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon pepper
3/4 cup water
oil for frying</b>

<ol><li>rinse, then shake dry the garlic chives. pick out any dried out leaves. chop them into 5 cm lengths. set aside.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>if using seafood, clean and prep by chopping into small pieces. this time i used a handful of shrimp i found in the freezer. i defrosted them in cold water, took off the shells and chopped them fine. set aside.

<li>in a large bowl, mix flour, mochiko, eggs, salt and pepper and water. mix well. gently fold in the chives and seafood, if using.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>turn the stove to medium high and heat a couple tablespoons of oil in a frypan. when the oil is hot, add heaping spoonfuls of the batter. make them any size you want. this time i made them pretty small. but they can be two, three or even four times that size.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>fry on each side, until the sides are slightly browned. add more oil as needed.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>serve with chojang (recipe at the bottom).</ol>
<i>notes:<blockquote>buchu is apparently sometimes called garlic chives or chinese chives. they are not the same thing as regular chives. the regular western chives are shaped like straws. buchu, on the other hand, is flat and shaped like loooong blades of grass. i looked it up and i believe the scientific name is </i>Allium tuberosum<i>. i know for a fact that these are found as weeds in america. as a child, i went into the forest with my mother and gathered them where she made jeon and buchu kimchi. also, i have collected buchu in public parks in maryland and in virginia.

when sold at stores, they are typically sold in bunches (regular chopsticks for size reference):

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...blockquote></i>

<hr width = "65%">

chojang
dipping sauce

ingredients
<b>1 part water
1.5 parts vinegar
3 parts soy sauce</b>

<ol><li>mix all three ingredients in a jar or small bowl.
<li>if desired, add some or all of the following:
<blockquote><ul><li>sesame seeds
<li>gochuggaru (korean chile powder)
<li>finely chopped scallions</ul></ol>
<i>notes:<blockquote>i usually make this so that the water is equal to 1/4 of a cup. i store the rest in the fridge for later use, using only about half a cup for one night.

this sauce is also used for any other kind of jeon and for mandu.

you can up the gochuggaru content.</blockquote></i>
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#52 torakris

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Posted 19 October 2004 - 09:44 PM

gorgeous!

are they commonly made in small sizes like that?
I usually see them as one large fry pan sized piece that is then cut into smaller pieces. I like the little ones! :biggrin:

and the garlic chives are called nira in Japanese and should be available at Japanese markets as well.

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#53 viaChgo

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Posted 20 October 2004 - 07:33 AM

I love these garlic chive pancakes! I've had them in various sizes...individual to the larger pancake-sized ones as well.

I forget how easy these things are to make.

Though I never really make any banchan myself. I always end up buying from the banchan bar at my local grocery when I eat Korean food.

However, this thread may inspire me to make some of my own! :biggrin:

#54 melonpan

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 09:34 AM

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<b>anchovy stir fry sidedish</b> (green pepper and anchovy stir fry)
멸치볶음 (멸치 풋고추 볶음)

2 cups of dried anchovies, picked over
8 korean green chile peppers, sliced into thick strips
2 red jalapenos, sliced into strips
8 cloves garlic, sliced thin
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
2 tablespoons water
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1.5 tablespoons sugar
1 tablespoon of sake or cooking wine
a drop of sesame seed oil
toasted sesame seeds

<ol><li>prep the ingredients. pick over the anchovies, making sure the anchovies are clean. slice the chile peppers, jalapenos and garlic.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>in a non stick pan, fry the anchovies over medium high heat WITHOUT oil for a couple minutes. move the anchovies to a bowl for the time being.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>in the now empty pan, add two tablespoons of cooking oil. fry the korean green chile peppers, the jalapenos and the garlic for about three minutes, until the garlic has cooked through and the green chile shave brightened.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>add the water, the soy sauce, sugar and sake. mix well. keep stirring so that the sugar dissolves and so that the water starts to evaporate and the sauce thickens.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>after about two minutes, when the sauce has thickened a bit and the bubbles are bigger, dump in all the anchovies and stir well.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>keep stir frying until the dish dries out a little bit, but take care not to burn.

<li>add a little bit of sesame seed oil for flavor and top with toasted sesame seeds, if desired. (i didnt this time around.)</ol>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<hr width = "65%">

notes:<blockquote><ul><li>you can find anchovies (멸치, myeolchi) at the korean supermarket. they will be labeled as dried anchovies and in korean, they will be labeled as 볶음멸치 (bokkeum myeolchi). they come in a variety of sizes for different uses (stir fries or for use in making soup base) but the ones im using for this dish average 4 cm from head to tail.

you can use iriko in this recipe (it is the same thing as myeolchi, actually). if they are too large, just pull off the heads and take out the innards before cooking. the iriko below are kind of on the large side, although there are even larger grades.

some folks pull the heads and innards out for even the small guys. thats too fussy for me. besides, this dish still tastes good with the heads! but any larger than 4 cm, id probably pull the heads off too.

<center> a "special" grade from korea. a little more expensive than the regular stuff. was used this time around.
<img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<center>another brand on the left and japanese iriko on the right.
<img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>korean green chile peppers (풋고추, put gochu) are korean red chiles that have not yet matured. they are not as spicy as when they are red. they are eaten raw (often dipped into chile paste or in soy bean paste or a mixture of both) or cooked in stews and stirfries. <a href="http://images.google...a=N&tab=wi">put gochu images from google</a>. these green chile peppers can be more spicy than bell peppers, but are generally pretty mild.

<center>at one of the stores, they label them as "korean chilli" (sic)
<img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<center>a close up of "put gochu", korean green chile pepper
<img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>since the green peppers are not very spicy, i have added jalapenos. i have chosen red ones for their color. they are optional, as are the korean green chiles.

<li>i have made this dish with walnuts and pecans. they are an interesting addition. you can add them when you stir fry the garlic and peppers.

<li>you can go the other extreme and do this dish with ONLY the anchovies. that tastes good too. be sure to increase the anchovies for the amount of seasoning if you want to do that...</ul></blockquote>thank you for reading.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#55 galleygirl

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 10:37 AM

Wow, Melonpan, this is great; thanks especially for all the great photos detailing everything....I usually buy my banchan to go, and my pancakes from a place that makes them on weekends mornings, but I'm gonnah give it a try..

I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?

#56 torakris

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Posted 24 October 2004 - 03:49 PM

melonpan,
thank you for the recipe for that anchovy dish!!!!!

I have eaten it a couple times and even seen recipes for it but now I am going to try it!! :biggrin:

In Japan, most of the recipes use shishito, a Japanese green pepper on the very mildly spicy side. I might give it a try with that as chile peppers are hard to come by here.....

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#57 melonpan

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Posted 26 October 2004 - 12:55 AM

I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?

maybe you are thinking about bindaeddeok (빈대떡)? they are made with mung beans. flour or mashed. i dont actually know. but i think this is a good chance for me to find out and maybe even try cooking. as a kid, i never liked bindaeddeok, not if there was good jeon around. but now i can appreciate it and even like it when other people order.

i will look into learning how to make it, but i am unable to do anything in the immediate future. when i have the chance, i will post here.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#58 melonpan

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Posted 05 November 2004 - 12:49 AM

continuing on the jangajji...

back on the 22 (oct) i drained the jars of vinegar and added soy sauce. the veggies had lost some water and since i needed one of the jars for some soup i had made i combined all the veggies from one of the jars into another.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...41104jang.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<center>you can see the lid that i stick on top (left photo) to keep the veggies under.
<img src="http://www.rawbw.com...1104jang4.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

the jangajji is just a step away from being done.. i had one of the carrots today. they were an experiment. i had never done (or seen this) jangajji with carrots... and now i think i know why. they get kind of soft. they were much more promising just under the vinegar. but they dont seem to hold up under the soy sauce. the garlic was crunchalicious though.

anyhow, if i can find time this weekend (maybe on monday if i cant find time earlier) i will drain the soy sauce out. this time, i will reserve the soy sauce. i threw away the vinegar, but i think if i were more frugal, i would have saved it... found a use for it somehow. wish i did now. experiment. for next time.

my mom has taught me to boil the reserved soy sauce to get rid of the excess water from the veggies. then you use the soy sauce for making dipping sauces. its SPICY good! (example: for mandu or for cha dol baegi)

after you drain the soy sauce, you leave the veggies in the jar in the fridge. you take out small batches and mix them with sugar to taste and enjoy as a banchan. photos will be posted again later when i do this.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#59 melonpan

melonpan
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Posted 05 November 2004 - 12:54 AM

I have one question about the pancakes...I always thought they were made with ground soybeans, or soy bean flour? Am I confusing them with a different version?

maybe you are thinking about bindaeddeok (빈대떡)? they are made with mung beans. flour or mashed. i dont actually know. but i think this is a good chance for me to find out and maybe even try cooking. as a kid, i never liked bindaeddeok, not if there was good jeon around. but now i can appreciate it and even like it when other people order.

i will look into learning how to make it, but i am unable to do anything in the immediate future. when i have the chance, i will post here.

follow up to this...

did some online research and found that most bindaeddeok is made from rehydrated, then ground (in a blender) dried mung beans. i have found a recipe for a bindaeddeok made from ground soybeans (fried okara patties is another way to put it). i have purchased the mung beans and when i get a chance i will post the results of my try at bindaeddeok. it will be some time probably, though.
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#60 jschyun

jschyun
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Posted 06 November 2004 - 07:28 PM

It's been a while since I've made it, but I used dried mung beans which I soaked in water and then whirred in a blender until very smooth. I think others might whir it less than me. It's actually really easy with a blender.

I made mine pretty thin and throw stuff in it like seafood (I like baby octopus, small shrimp) and maybe a little almost-over-the-hill kimchi. The appeal of bindaeddeok for me are the seafood treasures and the vinegary soy dipping sauce, with the creamy pancake background.

For once I have to say that I don't appreciate the supermarket version. So far in my experience, they've all been quite poor.

great pics!
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW