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Silicone Molds: Selecting, Cooking and Baking With


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93 replies to this topic

#61 Sethro

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 10:56 AM

Sethro's suggestion is good; I use a hair dryer myself. I hope someone else will be able to help re: sponge sheet. :)

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Missed that bit. Is he asking about sponge on a silpat? I've never had any trouble with that--seems to come right off clean every time. Why would you roll it on the silpat? Like for a roulade wouldn't you need it on parchment to pull it tight anyhow?

As for cheesecake, the easiest way is to freeze and invert, but with some very delicate style cheesecakes you can't touch the surface even then without marring it. For the ricotta souflee cake at perilla I had to cut it at room temp right on the silpat (using a cake knife on a silpat won't damage it).

#62 iii_bake

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 06:55 PM

Thanks for all your input.

About freezing, is there any dessert that freezing will change the texture ecen after thawing?

About the roulade,
i will pre-role the sponge when it is still very warm and leave to cool so that i can role it easier afterwards. My wonder was that if i need to leave the sponge to cool completely on the silicone sheet...what do you guys do?

Further, if you are to butter n flour the silicone mould like any toher type of moulds...what benefit do we get from using silicone.

Pardon my ignorance,

iii

#63 Tri2Cook

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 06:57 PM

About freezing, is there any dessert that freezing will change the texture ecen after thawing?

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It doesn't make gelatin happy. Makes it a very efficient filter though. :biggrin:
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#64 Sethro

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Posted 28 April 2008 - 07:33 PM

Thanks for all your input.

About freezing, is there any dessert that freezing will change the texture ecen after thawing?

About the roulade,
i will pre-role the sponge when it is still very warm  and leave to cool so that i can role it easier afterwards. My wonder was that if i need to leave the sponge to cool completely on the silicone sheet...what do you guys do?

Further, if you are to butter n flour the silicone mould like any toher type of moulds...what benefit do we get from using silicone.

Pardon my ignorance,

iii

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I believe that freezing and thawing changes the texture and flavor of everything. I try not to freeze something unless it is to be served frozen.

The benefits of silicon are:
1) it can be poured into any shape
2) It can be super-heated or cooled without any damage
3) It remains flexible throughout the entire range of practical temperatures (for our purposes), making un-molding cakes and other delicate confections very easy.

Edited by Sethro, 28 April 2008 - 07:33 PM.


#65 gfron1

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 09:49 AM

Where do the pros store your silicone? I'm asking because my collection has grown from a few to a bunch, so what used to do just fine in my toy box has now started overflowing and falling out all the time. Are you hanging them on a wall? These suckers like to creep around so I've got to get them wrangled.

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#66 pax

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:56 PM

This post is directed to anyone who has baked in silicone pans. I taste a chemical residue in the bake goods whenever I bake something in a silicone pan. I have baked several different chocolate cakes in a French-made Flexipan, and, every time I do, I detect an unpleasant chemical taste in the final product. I think I can also detect an off taste when I bake cookies on Silpats.

Am I the only one who finds that cooking in silicone pans leaves behind a detectable taste?

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I have a couple of silicone muffin "tins" and cake rounds, and I've been ok with those if I cook longer and slower. However, over Halloween I picked up a silicone seasonal cupcake thingie and I DID have an off taste. So much so I tossed two "tins" worth and baked the rest of them in regular tin tins and they were fine.
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#67 jumanggy

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 03:42 PM

Where do the pros store your silicone?  I'm asking because my collection has grown from a few to a bunch, so what used to do just fine in my toy box has now started overflowing and falling out all the time.  Are you hanging them on a wall?  These suckers like to creep around so I've got to get them wrangled.

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Hi Rob, I'm thinking you might like to use one of the large plastic storage boxes with lids that snap on the sides. Take up a lot of space but I'm sure that's space you don't mind using for your toys :)
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#68 Tiny

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 09:18 PM

Where do the pros store your silicone?  I'm asking because my collection has grown from a few to a bunch, so what used to do just fine in my toy box has now started overflowing and falling out all the time.  Are you hanging them on a wall?  These suckers like to creep around so I've got to get them wrangled.

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In my kitchen we keep them on sheet trays on a speed rack organized by type and size....but we have a ton of them.

#69 gfron1

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Posted 18 January 2009 - 10:54 PM

Thanks guys. I currently store them in the big rubbermade bins and I'm overflowing, so I'll look at the speedrack option.

Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM


#70 pax

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Posted 19 January 2009 - 12:18 PM

I'm not a pro, but for what my fix is worth, I keep them inside similarly shaped metal baking equipment, otherwise I find that they get warpy.
“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”

#71 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 18 September 2009 - 04:36 PM

I have a problem I don't see addressed on this thread that I'm hoping you can help with. I just got the mini Bordelais mold for baking little pound cakes in. I'm using 5/8 oz of batter to get the height I want and they are baking unevenly. The center row rises straight up and down but the outside rows rise higher towards the center of the pan. How can I fix this? I tip them upside-down to serve and 2/3's of them sit crooked. I tried putting it in a 9x13 cake pan to see if the higher edges of the pan would help but it didn't. Any ideas?

edited to add: I'm recipe testing at the moment so I'm using my conventional oven at home. Would this problem be corrected or less obvious in a commercial convection?

Edited by CanadianBakin', 18 September 2009 - 05:11 PM.

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#72 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 21 September 2009 - 08:05 AM

Just bumping this up because I need your help :)
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#73 brokenscale

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Posted 11 May 2010 - 08:59 PM

a while back i saw some really unique modern silicone cake molds. They were european. I really want to buy some but for the life of me i cant remember the name of the company, im pretty sure it started with an s. Any help or reccomendations would be great.

Omar

#74 dougal

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Posted 12 May 2010 - 02:55 AM

Started with an S ... ? Silform? Silicon Flex?
However, I think Elastomoule and Flexipan are the big names.

Anyway, here's a French toyshop (in English) with a vast range http://www.cuisine-f...cone/index.html
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#75 ejw50

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Posted 14 May 2010 - 08:06 AM

silikomart?

Like these?
http://shopchefrubbe...me.php?cat=1433

Edited by ejw50, 14 May 2010 - 08:07 AM.


#76 brokenscale

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Posted 26 May 2010 - 06:11 PM

Talk about being way off i found them...they are italian and it starts with a p. I ordered my molds today. If anyone is interested in looking at them they are amazing http://www.pavonital...asp?language=en

#77 J.Stevens

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 08:26 AM

siliconemolds.com has a few good ones for real cheap !!!
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#78 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 08:42 AM

Talk about being way off i found them...they are italian and it starts with a p. I ordered my molds today. If anyone is interested in looking at them they are amazing http://www.pavonital...asp?language=en

They do have some beautiful shapes! How is the pricing?
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#79 CanadianBakin'

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Posted 27 May 2010 - 09:08 AM

I have these lovely silcone bordelais molds that I bake lemon pound cake in. It gives the effect of a mini bundt.
If I remember correctly, the first couple times I used them they popped out fine but now I always have to freeze them first. This isn't very efficient and I'm wondering if this is common or does anyone have suggestions?
The other problem is that the center ones rise evenly but the outside ones all rise higher towards the center of the pan and then I have to even them off individually. Again, another waste of time.
Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

#80 brokenscale

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Posted 28 May 2010 - 02:24 PM

i ordered them from a reseller, what killed me was the shipping. The molds themselves were very reasonable

#81 Ibake

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 06:36 AM

Demarle out of France, catalog is on line
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#82 prasantrin

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 06:52 AM

Ouch!

Not cheap, that's for sure, but beautiful. Before I saw the pries, I thought they'd be nice to have for my mango pudding, but for home use, they're a bit too much.

#83 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 27 April 2011 - 04:45 PM

I have a problem I don't see addressed on this thread that I'm hoping you can help with. I just got the mini Bordelais mold for baking little pound cakes in. I'm using 5/8 oz of batter to get the height I want and they are baking unevenly. The center row rises straight up and down but the outside rows rise higher towards the center of the pan. How can I fix this? I tip them upside-down to serve and 2/3's of them sit crooked. I tried putting it in a 9x13 cake pan to see if the higher edges of the pan would help but it didn't. Any ideas?

edited to add: I'm recipe testing at the moment so I'm using my conventional oven at home. Would this problem be corrected or less obvious in a commercial convection?


Canadian Bakin', what is your batter consistency like? If it's stiff enough to play with it a bit before you put the molds in the oven, you can try pushing it towards the edges of the molds - this seems to help me when I've got something that tends to dome (some of my cake recipes are terrible for doming, and I end up having to cut the tops off the cake before I can layer them... Meh, it's another story entirely.)

The other thing you can try is reducing your leavening a bit and then filling the molds a bit more than you currently are, say 2/3 - this will slow your rise and should help eliminate doming.

If you're seeing uneven rising, it might be as a result of your oven. Or, it might be the pan you're using to support your molds (I'm assuming you use a cookie sheet or something similar). If your oven rack permits, try doing away with the base pan - if it's part of the problem, it's because it's causing an uneven distribution of heat across the silicone - which would make sense if you're seeing the most warp in the edges of the mold.

Edited by Panaderia Canadiense, 27 April 2011 - 04:47 PM.

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#84 kayb

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 07:58 PM

Question from a silicone newbie.

I just purchased my first silicone mold, from Paderno, a "Dolce Stampi" mold with 16 oval shaped wells. I wanted that partular size/shape, and silicone was the only one I could find. My questions:

1. Should I put the mold on a cookie sheet for filling and baking?
2. Any adjustments to make in temperature?
3. Can it go in the dishwasher?

I bought the thing because I want to make gluten-free pigs in a blanket, and the wells are the right size and shape. Gluten free breads, in my limited experience, are not thick enough to work like a dough and wrap the sausage, so my plan is to layer batter, sausage, batter. They're probably the only use the pan will get.
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#85 Pierogi

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 08:43 PM

Question from a silicone newbie.

I just purchased my first silicone mold, from Paderno, a "Dolce Stampi" mold with 16 oval shaped wells. I wanted that partular size/shape, and silicone was the only one I could find. My questions:

1. Should I put the mold on a cookie sheet for filling and baking?
2. Any adjustments to make in temperature?
3. Can it go in the dishwasher?

I bought the thing because I want to make gluten-free pigs in a blanket, and the wells are the right size and shape. Gluten free breads, in my limited experience, are not thick enough to work like a dough and wrap the sausage, so my plan is to layer batter, sausage, batter. They're probably the only use the pan will get.


Kay, I have a silicone cannele pan. I feel its mandatory to put it on a sheet pan for filling and baking; it would sploosh batter all over if I tried to move it without the rigid sheet underneath. If you're not using it for a liquidy-batter application, it may not be necessary, but it doesn't hurt.

I haven't needed to adjust time/temp for the canneles, but the recipe I use (Jacques Pepin's) was written for the silicone molds. I think good rule of thumb for any new bakeware is to keep a close eye the first couple of times you use it, to see how it's going to work in your oven.

The instruction sheet for mine said no dishwasher.

Hope that helps.
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#86 dcarch

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Posted 06 February 2012 - 09:43 PM

It is easy to make your own custom mold.

Just get food grade silicone molding rubber.

dcarch

#87 Kouign Aman

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 12:18 PM

I was just given a 9" diameter silicon cake mold shaped to produce a rose.
Its sagged to a narrow oval shape. Will it be harmed if I set it inside a metal ring to keep it round during baking?
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#88 Felicia M Lazar

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Posted 29 May 2012 - 10:33 PM

There are a number of eGullet threads that touch upon silicone baking moulds, but I'm looking for some straight-up advice, hopefully with brand-names. I have a micro-bakery and make financiers, baby bundts and Madeleines. I'm old-school and love metal moulds, but am increasingly attracted to silicone; the only problem is I don't want to use something that's going to transfer flavour or gas me out (using the moulds over & over again and inhaling the fumes all day really concerns me). Is there anything that's been on the market long enough to give reliable health-related data ?

When I was training, my beloved pc instructor cursed in Italian every time anyone mentioned silicone for baking and that may be part of my bias against it, but this was well over 5 years ago. What are your experiences ? Any comments would be most welcome...

#89 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 05:05 AM

Silikomart is my gold standard; I have a number of moulds from them, both smaller types (mini muffins, bundtlets, etc) as well as larger ones (full-size bundts, sunflowers, etc) and I love their silpats. Their stuff doesn't off-gass, transfer weird flavours, or discolour, even under heavy use.
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#90 Felicia M Lazar

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 11:45 PM

Excellent, Elizabeth, thanks ! Which line(s) do you have ? They have various subsections in the professional range as well as their extremely colourful houseware line... I think I can get most of them here or online. A while back I looked into signing up on the professional site to purchase directly from Italy but the privacy policy was such a joke I gave up.