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Making Hot Sauces – Recipes, Techniques, etc.

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94 replies to this topic

#61 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:51 PM

You can safely hot pack (hot fill and hold) hot sauces without a canner and store at room temperature of the pH is low enough.

I keep several sauces that way.

 

http://thehotpepper....-hot-sauce-101/

 

 

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#62 davidkeay

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 07:58 PM

Thanks Martin - that's great info. I will check it out later!

 

The method I had used had me using 2% of the weight of the peppers in salt, and not adding liquid. Would it work/make sense to just make a 2% salt + water brine, and top off the jars with that rather than going with salt based on the amount of peppers I'm using?



#63 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:11 PM

Thanks Martin - that's great info. I will check it out later!

 

The method I had used had me using 2% of the weight of the peppers in salt, and not adding liquid. Would it work/make sense to just make a 2% salt + water brine, and top off the jars with that rather than going with salt based on the amount of peppers I'm using?

 

I prefer to not dilute the flavor by adding more than just a tiny amount of brine to top off the jar if needed.

You can extract more liquid from the peppers before packing into the fermentation vessel if you chop, salt and store in the fridge overnight.

If you do wish to make a brine, adding 2% salt to the water wouldn't be enough salt. You'll need an equilibrium brine where the total salt percentage isn't less than 2% for safety reasons (some suggest more than 2% is needed, there's a lot of conflicting information). 

In other words, add the pepper weight and water weight together and use at least 2% salt based on the sum of the two.

 

HTH

 

~Martin


Edited by DiggingDogFarm, 19 May 2013 - 08:24 PM.

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#64 davidkeay

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 08:26 PM

That makes perfect sense - adding the two weights and going from there. Packing the peppers with 2% salt, and then topping off with a 2% brine is probably what I'll go with next time.



#65 Ttogull

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Posted 08 August 2013 - 08:42 PM

Does anyone here make fermented hot sauce?

 
I'm going to try it again soon, and will report back. 


I did this for the first time tonight. I've done other things, mostly wild fermented. With this one, I mixed up a bunch of cayenne and yellow scotch bonnet and threw in 1/8 or so of a fermented green tomato to kick things off. I remembered this topic, and thought I'd check to see if anyone else was fermenting.

I licked the spoon after stirring. This puppy is hot. My glasses keep fogging 15 minutes later!

So this will take a month or so. I'm interested in your experience.

One thing I'd like to do is introduce some wood flavor. I'm going to buy a bunch of peppers and try some things. 1) fermented roasted peppers. The peppers roasted over wood. 2) another raw version but with raw wood chips (oak? Hickory?). 3) a raw version but with charred wood chips. Anybody have any thoughts or experience to share? I know raw peppers with raw chips has been been done before.

#66 chileheadmike

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Posted 09 August 2013 - 07:05 AM

I'm making hot sauce this weekend. I have some ripe jalapenos, Kung Pao, Cayenne, and Thai Hot chiles. I also like to add some home grown and smoked chipotles from last year. I remove the stems, and run through the sausage grinder and simmer in salt water until all is very soft. Strain, return to the sauce pan and add vinegar and salt. It improves in flavor after about a week in the fridge.

I have some lemon drop chiles that I will incorporate into some hard candy as well. Basic hard candy with lemon extract and a drop or two of yellow food coloring. Not too hot and kinda tasty.
That's the thing about opposum inerds, they's just as tasty the next day.

#67 Ashen

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Posted 01 September 2013 - 09:18 PM

trinidad7pot_zpsaba780dd.jpg

 

the first harvest of a  few trinidad 7pots/pods   I have been growing.. hopefully will get enough to make a decent batch of sauce soon..


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#68 Ttogull

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Posted 02 September 2013 - 06:29 AM

Those Trinidad's look like they might hurt! I set up about 20 ghost chiles for a sauce, and a few pounds each of some Fatalii and chocolate habaneros for their own separate sauces. The Fatalii is my favorite because of its taste ( its name is cool too).

This is my first year to ferment. I've been letting my sauces go about 3 weeks. There is no comparison to store bought and, IMHO, fresh sauce.

My best one, I think, will be one I made with about 1/2 cup of yellow and black mustard seeds (pint jar) and yellow habaneros. I can't quit smelling it, it smells so good. It's only 3 days old, and I am hoping to ferment it about a month.

#69 &roid

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Posted 07 September 2013 - 03:10 PM

I've been growing some chillies on the kitchen windowsill for the last few months and today made Chris Amirault's version of Inner Beauty.  Wow! What an amazing sauce.

 

I had one habanero plant, one with some generic finger chillies and one with some Numex twighlights (not heard of these before, nice little purple/orange fruit, pretty hot). 

 

Kitchen smells great, and now I've got three bottles of really tasty hot sauce :)

 

Photo 3374.jpeg Photo 3373.jpeg Photo 3370.jpeg Photo 3371.jpeg Photo 3372.jpeg Photo 3389.jpeg



#70 Chris Amirault

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 07:36 AM

Glad you liked it so much -- it looks terrific! Did you tweak the recipe at all?
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#71 &roid

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 02:35 PM

Only that I used a mix of chillies instead of straight habaneros. The end result has a really, really good flavour and has been used on everything I've eaten today (ham sandwich, cheese, new bread recipe, steak sandwich, pancakes...!) 

 

I think I may try a bit more chilli powder (or possibly just more habaneros) next time as I could take it a little hotter.  I'd be interested to know how hot the original is as I've never had the pleasure of it, what does it compare to?



#72 patrickamory

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 06:00 PM

I just made Chris's Inner Beauty recipe too - something I've been planning to do for ages.

 

I didn't have enough habaneros so I filled out the mix with some bird chiles and cayenne peppers:

 

chiles.jpg

 

Here are all the ingredients, ready to go on the stove:

 

inner_beauty_ingredients.jpg

 

I didn't have curry powder so added some of my own garam masala, plus a heaping teaspoon of ground turmeric and a generous microplane of fresh turmeric root. I used sherry vinegar in place of the palm vinegar. And I added some pimenton de la vera for smokiness and depth. (I was a bit taken aback by how much smoke it added - just a tiny pinch.)

 

My mango was a little short of ripe. Otherwise I think my setup mirrored Chris's pretty closely.

 

I seem to have maxed out my eG filesize limit so I can't post the pics of the finished product, but it was strangely much browner than Chris and &roid's versions. Maybe because my habaneros were mostly green? 

 

But the flavor is a knockout - caramel-y, smoky, deep & hot. Not far from what I recall of the original, one of my favorite hot sauces. I'll be using this all over the place. Really easy to make too - people should go for it.

 



#73 Chris Amirault

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 07:19 PM

I think I may try a bit more chilli powder (or possibly just more habaneros) next time as I could take it a little hotter.  I'd be interested to know how hot the original is as I've never had the pleasure of it, what does it compare to?

 
I dunno! My picante taste memory is not what it used to be, and the variability of the habañeros I grow or can get has prevented me from stabilizing this. And -- sniff -- the last original bottle was drained years ago....
 

I seem to have maxed out my eG filesize limit so I can't post the pics of the finished product, but it was strangely much browner than Chris and &roid's versions. Maybe because my habaneros were mostly green?

I've had wide variety with color as well, and couldn't tell you why. Once, I added more clove than with another batch, and it seemed wicked brown, but that may be more psychological than anything else: it dominated and annoyed the heck out of me.
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#74 patrickamory

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Posted 08 September 2013 - 07:30 PM

Habaneros have wildly variable heat content in my experience. Out of this batch I tested a small piece of one raw and it was only mildly spicy; worried, I tried a piece of another and my heart was instantly racing, sweat starting out of my forehead, endorphins flowing! 



#75 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:15 AM

I have started  to ferment some hot pepper sauce. Using a mixture of Jalapeños, Habaneros a version of a Thai red chile and a couple of pounds of apple chiles. Bought the apples by mistake, as they have less heat than a sweet red pepper.
 
I added them to the blended mix, as I figured that they would add some sugar for the ferment. 
As my wife is leary of fermentation at home, I helped kickstart the process with a kefir starter.
I have everything in a 3gallon carboy. I added some toasted oak chip teabags to give hopefully some additional flavour.

#76 pastameshugana

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:34 AM

attachicon.gifPhoto 3389.jpeg

 

That is a beautiful picture!


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#77 pastameshugana

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:35 AM

My late husband used to make hot sauce (in my margarita blender, dammit!) out of habanaros, vinegar, garlic, and assorted other peppers and tomatoes. I would leave the house. Could NOT breathe!

 

I'm not a drinker - but I bet that would make for some 'interesting' margaritas...


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#78 rotuts

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:48 AM

Docrjm

 

" I helped kickstart the process with a kefir starter "

 

Im interested in how this works out.  Ive just become a student of Kefir and find it very interesting.

 

its not really hard to add pics, and they are very much appreciated.  just go to

 

"more reply option"   R bottom and look that over.  it takes several clicks.  please give it a try some time.

 

i wonder how the Kefir would enjoy the spice.

 

interesting idea


Edited by rotuts, 13 September 2013 - 10:52 AM.


#79 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 10:59 AM

Thanks Rotuts

 

Below are some of the peppers, I added about another 20lbs, leaving out the apple peppers in the subsequent market runs.

peppers.jpg

ferment.jpg



#80 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 11:06 AM

Rotuts

I used the kefir starter as it is not just lactic acid bacilli, but has some yeasts also.

Will keep you posted. I am planning to let it ferment for about 2-3 months. I will then check the acidity and bring the ph down to a shelf stable level.



#81 rotuts

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 11:13 AM

Wow 

 

Who Knew?   many many thanks for the pics Docrjm

 

I know nothing about this    :huh:

 

but i must say it really looks interesing.



#82 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 11:22 AM

Wow 

 

Who Knew?   many many thanks for the pics Docrjm

 

I know nothing about this    :huh:

 

but i must say it really looks interesing.

I'm just winging it mainly.

I am under instruction to try it 24-48hrs prior to serving to anyone else, If I am in the ER then it gets tossed :shock:



#83 rotuts

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 11:26 AM

do you have an reliable ref. for that length of time?

 

can you sample without damaging the MicoFlora from time to time?

 

excellent idea about the ER.  but they won't have any idea on how to deal with your "distress"  if you don't bring a sample of 

 

the "Soup" with you!

 

:laugh:



#84 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 11:43 AM

do you have an reliable ref. for that length of time?

 

can you sample without damaging the MicoFlora from time to time?

 

excellent idea about the ER.  but they won't have any idea on how to deal with your "distress"  if you don't bring a sample of 

 

the "Soup" with you!

 

:laugh:

Tabasco is fermented for more than a year in oak barrels, I have read around re fermentation.

Original plan was to get a 20L barrel and ferment in that, but was tardy in my ordering.

Have home aged some tequila in a small oak barrel(1L) and it was well aged in a few weeks.

I am not planning to taste as I go, but will keep an eye on the water lock to ensure ongoing fermentation. 

 

I want to bottle it in some amber boston rounds to create a more "medicinal" look, day job is a General Practitioner, but my wife wants a bottle that will highlight the red colour.



#85 Ttogull

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 12:32 PM

I have started  to ferment some hot pepper sauce. Using a mixture of Jalapeños, Habaneros a version of a Thai red chile and a couple of pounds of apple chiles. Bought the apples by mistake, as they have less heat than a sweet red pepper.
 
I added them to the blended mix, as I figured that they would add some sugar for the ferment. 
As my wife is leary of fermentation at home, I helped kickstart the process with a kefir starter.
I have everything in a 3gallon carboy. I added some toasted oak chip teabags to give hopefully some additional flavour.
 
Apologies for lack of imagery, I can't figure out how to add the pics


Looks good. I did my first batch this summer, and have now done maybe 15 more. Yellow habs, red habs, chocolate habs, Fatalii, ghost, etc.

You'll get over the hesitation. I had a similar 48 hour rule, but now I sample stuff every night. No, rotuts, it does not disturb the micro flora. I even stir mine up to get the pulp back in the liquid (your pulp is floating, but I don't think that is a big deal). The main issue with tasting is the increased possibility of mold. But I just scoop that out now, if I can. If not, it doesn't matter!

A couple of things I learned. A starter like kefir is unnecessary. More importantly, it can be detrimental to the taste. The bacteria grow in waves of different types, with the following generation feeding on the byproduct of the preceding generation. By introducing culture, the earlier stages are skipped, changing how the nutrients are broken down and what bacteria dominate at certain stages.

I used to inoculate, but no more. I see no real difference. As someone else said, there is no need to pay for culture when every fruit you buy comes free with everything you need.

I have had good batches and bad. Oddly, I made two jars of identical habanero mustard. One is the finest smelling stuff - sweet, hot, mustardy. The other started smelling like stinky feet - that's being generous. Even the color looked odd. Tossed that one without trying it.

I think whether you can go months depends on your environment. Mine have all settled down to listless at about 4 weeks. They tasted good, so I bottled

Also consider other veggies. Okra pickled with habs and garlic are very, very good.

#86 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 12:44 PM

Thanks for your words of encouragement. The 48hrs is more to keep my wife happy. I added the oak to hopefully get an aged quality to it. Have you tried that?

#87 Ttogull

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 01:59 PM

I did identical batches of cayenne peppers and garlic, one with mesquite chips and one without. Both my wife and I agreed that the mesquite version tasted thinner and less complex than the one without. I'm not sure how much weight I'd put on that though.

My favorite thing to add, after garlic, is fresh tomato. It really seems to add depth and complexity.

#88 Docrjm

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Posted 13 September 2013 - 06:51 PM

Ttogull

Thanks for the tips. This is my first chile ferment, as with all things will get tweaked.



#89 Docrjm

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Posted 29 September 2013 - 04:53 PM

Spent this afternoon blending the sauce. PH is 3.7

Will be bottling it later this week, final PH check at that time, if stable will not add any additional acid. Certainly packs some heat, dipped a tortilla chip in as a trial, one was more than adequate.



#90 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 23 February 2014 - 12:17 AM

1779202_10153829072350125_904478309_n.jp

 

My first attempt at making hot sauce. I'm using a blend of Zimbabwean bird's eyes from my own garden and an assortment of varieties I found at the local grocer. Everything they had, really. Six kinds all up. I'm using the Tabasco-style hot sauce (meaning fermented) recipe from John Currence's Pickles, Pigs and Whiskey as it seemed as a good a place to start as any.

 

I feel like I've got the bug now. I'm tempted to go buy another bagful of chillis and make a sauce using a different method.


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