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Making Hot Sauces – Recipes, Techniques, etc.

Condiments

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94 replies to this topic

#31 Toliver

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Posted 08 September 2004 - 09:04 AM

Thanks for the info.
It looks just the same as the little fire bombs my brother grows. It is the one pepper plant my brother doesn't yank and it keeps producing gloriously hot fruit year after year.
My sister-in-law (my brother's wife) can eat them and not blink an eye or shed a tear. She obviously has a much higher "heat" threshold than the rest of us chileheads.
Put us to shame is what she does... :laugh:

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#32 Daniel

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Posted 04 October 2004 - 10:14 AM

Just got some white bullets in to my office. I am plannign on making some sauce tonight but am really tempted to take a bite out of one of these things now.. Can anyone tell me how hot these little suckers are compared to say an orange habenero? These things are way too cute to be hot.. :laugh: yeah right

http://forums.egulle..._1096909821.jpg

Edited by Daniel, 04 October 2004 - 10:17 AM.


#33 hillvalley

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Posted 04 October 2004 - 02:32 PM

I am going to make my own hot sauce for the first time soon with the bounty from my parent's garden. I've got my recipe all figured out but I can't decide how much to make. How long will homemade hot sauce last?
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#34 Jason Perlow

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Posted 04 October 2004 - 02:39 PM

I am going to make my own hot sauce for the first time soon with the bounty from my parent's garden.  I've got my recipe all figured out but I can't decide how much to make.  How long will homemade hot sauce last?

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If its salt and vinegar heavy it should last indefinitely in the refrigerator.
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#35 QuinaQuen

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Posted 05 October 2004 - 01:25 AM

I've had wonderful success with the pepper garden this year, and have already produced some beautiful salsa with Cayenne and an early Habanero or two.  However, the Habaneros are really hitting their stride and I won't be able to make enough salsa to contain that heat and still be edible.  so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go.  I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste.  Any suggestions?

And, Oh, BTW, blenderless suggestions would be great, since that's what I am.

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No use telling you the recipe for happy flavor sauce if you're blenderless. You know, a good blender isn't expensive...
But anyway, here's ZANAHORIAS MAGICAS for your habanero-using pleasure...
As many habaneros as you can handle in one day
As many limes as it takes to cover the habaneros with juice

Using the sharpest prep knife you have, halve each habanero. If you live north of, say, Interstate 10, remove the placentas and seeds. Otherwise, save yourself the trouble.
Chiffonade the halves. Get them as thin as possible.
Marinade them in lime juice for at least one hour. What you don't intend to use right away, pack in thick ziplocks and freeze as quickly as possible WITH THE LIME JUICE.
This is the purest apotheosis of habanero flavor you can possibly achieve. Use zanahorias magicas only to exponentially augment the flavors of strong and simple dishes. Cabrito is in, birria is out. Fried carp good, poached snapper bad. You get the picture.
Nam Pla moogle; Please no MacDougall! Always with the frugal...

#36 Daniel

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Posted 05 October 2004 - 08:53 AM

Posted Image

Found a mini Bottle of CHambord in my place. Thought it makes it look a little more evil.

#37 QuinaQuen

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Posted 06 October 2004 - 12:46 AM

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Found a mini Bottle of CHambord in my place. Thought it makes it look a little more evil.

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That is sweet. Happy Flavor sauce would be right at home up in there.
Nam Pla moogle; Please no MacDougall! Always with the frugal...

#38 jackal10

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Posted 06 October 2004 - 01:08 AM

Navy cooks used to make chilli sherry as a condiment and seasoning. Take a bottle of sherry (Fino) and fill it full of chillis. Leave for a month. Great in soup, stews, tomato juice and the like.
On aircraft carriers it was called "Afterburner" for some reason...

#39 Keith Orr

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 10:14 AM

I came across this thread while browsing and though if anybody was still interested I'd submit my recipe which is a clone of a locally available sauce here in Portland OR

Sorta Secret Aardvark Sauce

1 – 14.5 oz can of diced tomatoes
1 – 14.5 oz can of rice wine vinegar – Used rice wine vinegar again
1-1/2 cups of peeled and grated carrots (packed into the measuring cup)
1 cup of finely diced white onion
1/4 cup of yellow mustard
1/3 cup of sugar
2 teaspoons of Morton’s Kosher Salt
1 teaspoon of black pepper
13 small Habaneros – seeded and membranes removed. (This was 2 oz. of Habs before cutting off the tops and removing the seeds and membranes)
2 teaspoons curry powder
Add 1 cup of water when cooking
5 or 6 cloves of garlic - roasted if you've got it

Put it all in the crockpot on high until everything is tender. About 3 hours

Whirl in food processor – Don’t puree until smooth – make it lightly/finely chunky.

Makes 3 pints - I haven't tried canning it, but I'll bet it would work well.

I've thought about making this with peaches or mangoes too, but haven't tried it yet.

#40 Peter the eater

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Posted 31 August 2008 - 04:09 PM

I've had wonderful success with the pepper garden this year, and have already produced some beautiful salsa with Cayenne and an early Habanero or two.  However, the Habaneros are really hitting their stride and I won't be able to make enough salsa to contain that heat and still be edible.  so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go.  I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste.  Any suggestions?

And, Oh, BTW, blenderless suggestions would be great, since that's what I am.

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I've found a great base for hot sauce:

1. cherry bomb hybrids
2. onions
3. garlic
4. Allen's Vegetable Cocktail

The alliums were softened over low heat with a little canola, in go the peppers until all is mushy. Add the juice then sugar and salt to taste. I used a submersion blender. Fast and yummy, finished product in the mason jar:

Posted Image
Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

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#41 Jenni

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Posted 05 September 2008 - 10:06 AM

Here's a basic Trini hot sauce that me and my family make. You can cook the mixture, or leave it uncooked, it's up to you. We get through hot sauce quickly, and a small batch lasts us a week or so.

Ingredients (this is very vague list in terms of quantities, judge it yourself):

15-20 habaneros
2-4 garlic cloves
Fresh herbs such as coriander, oregano, thyme (optional but tasty)
1 teaspoon or so of mustard powder (100% mustard "flour" AKA ground mustard seeds)
Salt, to taste
Vinegar or lemon juice or lime juice or a combination - enough to blend to a paste

Roughly chop everything, bung in a blender and add enough vinegar to make a sauce consistency. If you want to cook it (this tempers the flavour a little), just put it in a small pan and heat until it just bubbles. Cook for a couple of minutes, very gently. Put in a jar and keep in the fridge. Very yummy, goes with everything!

#42 Restorer

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Posted 06 September 2008 - 02:56 PM

I just picked up some small manzano chiles at the farmer's market this morning. Does anyone know what kind of flavors go well with this kind of pepper? I hear a traditional use is in a peach salsa, but I'm not too big on sweet salsas. I also have on hand jalapeños, serranos, and habaneros.
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#43 Chris Amirault

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 06:33 AM

I thought I'd bump this topic up, as I've been making more sauces lately. (Click here for my adventures with Inner Beauty, both purchased and made.)

This weekend I made a citrus, ancho, and tequila sauce from Bruce Kraig and Dudley Nieto's Cuisines of Hidden Mexico, and an arbol and garlic sauce from Rick Bayless's Authentic Mexican. Fresh out of the blender, I like the latter better: his use of toasted pepitos and sesame seeds gives the sauce terrific depth, and it's only been aging for a day.

Anyone else loading up for a cold winter?
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#44 John Rosevear

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:05 AM

I've actually been planning to do a batch of something Inner Beauty-esque, using the scaled-down version of CS's handwritten recipe from Serious Eats as a starting point. I'll probably get to it this weekend; if it's any good, I'll report back.
John Rosevear
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#45 Jaymes

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Posted 27 September 2010 - 11:26 AM

I've posted my recipe for a very basic salsa on eG before.

You can use any kind of chile pepper you like, or a mixture, and as many as you like...whatever.

The OP, way back in '04, didn't have a blender. One thinks it likely that perhaps he has purchased one in the ensuing years. Although you can make the salsa with a food processor, or a molcajete.

Here's a link to the recipe:

Cooked tomato salsa

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#46 Chris Amirault

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 05:33 AM

I've actually been planning to do a batch of something Inner Beauty-esque, using the scaled-down version of CS's handwritten recipe from Serious Eats as a starting point. I'll probably get to it this weekend; if it's any good, I'll report back.


John, I started with that one a long while back and ended up with the recipe to which I linked in the post above. I think that the "throw it in a blender and serve" was a crack about how simple hot sauces are to make, but it definitely doesn't apply to that particular, cooked sauce, imo.
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#47 budrichard

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 09:44 AM

Last year we made a trial batch of jalapeno/habanero hot sauce aged in a 5 liter Harsch crock.
The aging/fermentation gives the sauce a character akin to McIlhenny's which has Tabasco peppers aged in wooden casks. My son-in-law designed the label, I purchased the woozies, fitments, caps and shrink wrap and we bottled.
This year I had my local farmer plant additional jalapenos, habaneros and Tabasco peppers for me. I picked the 8 Tabasco plants about every week to get enough for the 5l crock and the plants are still producing. The jalapeno crop was very good but the habanero crop is great and much more than I could use. This year, the 20 liter Harsch crock has the jalapeno/habanero mix and the 5 liter has Tabasco pepper mash. I'm about one month into the aging process, only time will tell.
Last years batch has been judged very hot and tasty by my Mexican friends!-Dick

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#48 John Rosevear

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Posted 28 September 2010 - 12:46 PM

John, I started with that one a long while back and ended up with the recipe to which I linked in the post above. I think that the "throw it in a blender and serve" was a crack about how simple hot sauces are to make, but it definitely doesn't apply to that particular, cooked sauce, imo.


Yep, I went through those threads and saw your recipe after I posted the above. I'll probably end up doing something close to what you did.

I made the "Big Flavors of the Hot Sun" version a couple years ago and was both pleased by how close it came to what I remember of the real stuff and disappointed that it wasn't quite there. It didn't really taste right until it had been sitting for a few days, so maybe simmering is the right route.
John Rosevear
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#49 Jason Perlow

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:15 PM

So this weekend we had a major bumper crop of hot chiles from my garden. So much that the only thing I could think to do with them was to process them into an easily usable form -- hot sauce.

 

Most hot sauces seem to have 3 basic components -- chile peppers, vinegar, salt. Everything else added seems to be optional.

 

So this is what I did.

 

8751663564_943e2d0e12_o.jpg

 

Peppers were picked off the plants and stems removed, sorted by varietal. On the Left we have Ghost Peppers, Ornamental Jalapenos. Middle we have "Bikini Atoll" peppers and to the right we have "Ripper Habaneros" and some type of bird that I forgot the name of.

 

Each of these varietals were thrown into a pot, with enough vinegar to cover then, with six cloves of garlic added, and a decent amount of salt. The whole mess was cooked until the chiles were soft. After which it was thrown into the Vita-Mix and had the hell blended out of it.

 

8751883148_1c651f26a6_o.jpg

 

After tasting each "single origin" hot sauce we decided it was best to blend them. So the stuff in the mason jars on the left and the big vinegar bottle is a mixture of Ghost and Ripper Habanero. The Jalapenos and Bikini Atolls we decided to quick pickle in a simple vinegar, salt and sugar brine with some pickling spices.

 

hotsauce.jpg

 

Here's another batch I made a few days earlier without any particular attention to what kind of chiles and how much vinegar and salt and garlic I used. I just picked a bunch of different kinds that were ripe off the plants until I determined I had enough.

 

All the experiments I deem a success. But I'd like to hear how everyone else does this, what optional ingredients do you like to add and if you prepare things any differently.


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#50 judiu

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:45 PM

My late husband used to make hot sauce (in my margarita blender, dammit!) out of habanaros, vinegar, garlic, and assorted other peppers and tomatoes. I would leave the house. Could NOT breathe!
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#51 Jason Perlow

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 01:48 PM

Yeah it was like a chemical weapons factory for a few hours
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#52 Ashen

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 02:18 PM

I do something similar but  smoke   the chiles and garlic first with apple wood smoke  . I sometimes add onion to the mix. .   I don't have a vitamix so  I run the chiles ,onion and garlic through our oster blender with just enough  apple cider vinegar to get it moving , then run the resulting paste through food mill set up with the finest plate. ..  At that point I add enough apple cider vinegar to the milled paste to  get the consistency I want and salt to taste.   The leftovers in the foodmill ( bits of skins and seeds ), I spread on a piece of foil and put back into the smoker until it is completely dried.  I grind this up for a smoked chile  powder which I  add to rubs or sprinkle over eggs etc. 


Edited by Ashen, 19 May 2013 - 02:19 PM.

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#53 Ttogull

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 02:31 PM

I love roasting them, especially the habaneros, before making a hot sauce. I like to roast-smoke with mesquite.

#54 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 03:25 PM

I make a lot of different hot sauces.

 

One of my favorites is smoke-roasted jalapeno and onion....green jalapenos (with or without the seeds and placenta) and onions are smoke-roasted in the smoker and  then cooked with white vinegar, a little water, a touch of garlic, a bit of spicy brown mustard, a bit of lemon juice for freshness and just a touch of sweetener for balance.....it's great!

 

 

 

~Martin


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#55 ePressureCooker

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:42 PM

Yeah it was like a chemical weapons factory for a few hours

 

I fourth, fifth the recommendation to roast / char the peppers first next time.

 

As for the "chemical weapons" effect, if its really bad, consider buying what is called an "acid gas respirator".  It covers your mouth and nose, and filters everything you breathe through (I think) a carbon filter before the air gets to you.  Fabric dyers use it when they use bleach for discharge dyeing - very little is getting through this thing.  You need to store it in the packaging so its exposed to as little air as possible when not in use (it continues filtering) and periodically you'll need to replace the filters, but if you don't mind having a mask over the lower half of your face, it can really relieve the "chile burn"....



#56 heidih

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:55 PM

Good stuff Jason. Did you can them for preservation or just figure the virulent chili oils and vinegar would do the task? Should your surplus increase to the breaking point they freeze beautifully just plucked off the stem and tossed in zip-locs - no sticking together.

#57 davidkeay

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 04:56 PM

Does anyone here make fermented hot sauce?

 

I tried a few months ago and had decent results- a mix of jalapeno and habanero peppers, pureed and mixed with 2% salt, then packed into a mason jar and left in a dark place for 5 days or so. Many recipes go far longer than that, but I was starting to get some mold near the top of the jar (which I hadn't filled completely), so I stopped the process and used them then. 

 

I'm going to try it again soon, and will report back. 



#58 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:12 PM

Does anyone here make fermented hot sauce?

 

I tried a few months ago and had decent results- a mix of jalapeno and habanero peppers, pureed and mixed with 2% salt, then packed into a mason jar and left in a dark place for 5 days or so. Many recipes go far longer than that, but I was starting to get some mold near the top of the jar (which I hadn't filled completely), so I stopped the process and used them then. 

 

I'm going to try it again soon, and will report back. 

 

Pepper fermentation is a sequential process that takes time.

It requires up to a month to complete the fermentation cycle at room temperature, longer is better.

The following link highlights sauerkraut fermentation, but pepper fermentation is much the same.

 

http://www.meatsands...tion-sauerkraut

 

Here's a master's thesis that has a lot of useful information on pepper fermenting and aging.

 

http://etd.lsu.edu/d.../Koh_thesis.pdf

 

 

~Martin


Edited by DiggingDogFarm, 19 May 2013 - 05:18 PM.

~Martin
 
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#59 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:33 PM

I forgot to address the mold issue.
I typically ferment in wide mouth canning jars, both quart and half gallon.
I pack the peppers to eliminate any air.
I top off with brine all the way to the rim, I then insert an empty 1/2 pint Ball quilted jelly jar to catch any expansion. (the jelly jar should fit snugly against the lid)
Making sure that the brine still comes to the rim of the canning jars, I then top the jar with a loose lid (no band), and top with a pint jar filled with water.
The jar is not opened until fermentation is complete.
No mold or yeast growth.

 
 
~Martin

Edited by DiggingDogFarm, 19 May 2013 - 05:36 PM.

~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious and radical farmer, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 


#60 Jason Perlow

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Posted 19 May 2013 - 05:44 PM

Good stuff Jason. Did you can them for preservation or just figure the virulent chili oils and vinegar would do the task? Should your surplus increase to the breaking point they freeze beautifully just plucked off the stem and tossed in zip-locs - no sticking together.


all of these are being stored in the fridge, but I've seen similar vinegar based hot sauces in the Caribbean left out in the hot sun for god knows how long. I've used enough vinegar to effectively preserve it, should last in the fridge indefinitely I'd think
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