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Making Hot Sauces – Recipes, Techniques, etc.

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94 replies to this topic

#1 donk79

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 08:06 PM

I've had wonderful success with the pepper garden this year, and have already produced some beautiful salsa with Cayenne and an early Habanero or two. However, the Habaneros are really hitting their stride and I won't be able to make enough salsa to contain that heat and still be edible. so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go. I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste. Any suggestions?

And, Oh, BTW, blenderless suggestions would be great, since that's what I am.

#2 Kenk

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 08:33 PM

I grew some habaneros a couple of years ago. The hot sauce I made was the hottest thing I ever tryed. This really wasn't my goal but this stuff was so hot I was affraid of the stuff. The smell of the stuff made you start to tremble. This stuff really hurt when you used too much. The stuff tastes great.

Try adding vinigar, salt, garlic. Blend it cook it put it in sterilized jam jars.
You might want to try adding some orange juice.

#3 Human Bean

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Posted 08 September 2003 - 09:55 PM

It sounds like you're asking for recipes for canning; I can't help, because I've never done that. You might try a Melinda's-style carrot/onion/hab recipe for that; as always, google is your friend.

I've generally preserved habs by drying; cut a top-to-bottom slit in them to aid the process. You can freeze them, but they'll be somewhat mushy after defrosting - probably okay if you're just going to make fresh salsa with them.

I've had varying amounts of success with refrigerating a fresh salsa; sometimes it's radically different a mere 24 hours later. Something I've been trying lately is adding powdered vitamin C tablets to fresh salsa - about 3 grams per quart. It's main function is as an anti-oxidant, but also adds some sourness. I can't say that this method has been staggeringly successful though; I'm still experimenting, but the concept seems promising.

One thing you might try if you haven't already is to add mangoes to a tomato-based hab salsa - the fruitiness of the habs and the mangoes go well together. I made one a couple of weeks ago for some friends, and it was a big hit. I don't have a recipe, but it was tomatoes, sweet onions (Walla Walla/Vidalia/Maui, take your pick), yellow-skinned mangoes, habs, lime juice, a bit of garlic and salt/pepper. No cilantro; it didn't seem right at the time. The main defect of this sauce, surprisingly enough, was that it wasn't hot enough after being in the refrigerator overnight. Store-bought habs may have contributed, but I made a point of surgically removing most of the heat, since these weren't regualr hab eaters. I guess I overcompensated in the heat reduction.

#4 Sweet Willie

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 08:32 AM

so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go. I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste.  Any suggestions?

There is a Q & A section on eGullet that might help, see here: http://forums.egulle...T/f/108/t/27260
"I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be"

#5 sabg

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 01:47 PM

I've had wonderful success with the pepper garden this year, and have already produced some beautiful salsa with Cayenne and an early Habanero or two. However, the Habaneros are really hitting their stride and I won't be able to make enough salsa to contain that heat and still be edible.  so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go. I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste.  Any suggestions?

And, Oh, BTW, blenderless suggestions would be great, since that's what I am.

my grandmother used to make a hot pepper jelly (had sugar in it) and she served it on crakers and toast with cream cheese. bleieve it or not it was great. i will look for the recipe this evening

#6 donk79

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Posted 11 September 2003 - 09:24 AM

Thanks for all the suggestions. The jelly sounds like a great idea sabg. I tried to do some jelly before I knew what I was doing canning and ruined it as the lids popped ofin the water bath, so I'd love to give it another attempt, especially with a recipe instead of just winging it. I hope you can find that recipe.

#7 AuntieEm

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Posted 11 September 2003 - 12:02 PM

Have you ever visited the GardenWeb site Gardenweb? they have lots of canning tips and jelly recipes on the "Harvest Forum". I think a peach or mango chutney w/ habs is hard to beat.
Here's another link to recipes:clickity

Edited by AuntieEm, 11 September 2003 - 12:20 PM.


#8 twodogs

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 11:10 AM

pickle all your season habaneros so as to keep your options open

the pickled whole habaneros last indefinately and then can be used at your discretion for sauces, chutney's jams, vinaigrettes, marinades, chile eating contests. also depending on the use you can adjust the heat with or without seeds

finally, the adition of acid and flavors in the pickling liquid brings the habanero into a balanced flavor, creates a habanero vinegar, and the acidulated chile adds balance to whatever you add it to
enjoy

cheers
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ideasinfood

#9 =Mark

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 11:28 AM

Here's a couple recipes for hot pepper jams and jellies you might want to look into...
=Mark

Give a man a fish, he eats for a Day.
Teach a man to fish, he eats for Life.
Teach a man to sell fish, he eats Steak

#10 alanamoana

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Posted 20 September 2003 - 12:24 PM

Something I've been trying lately is adding powdered vitamin C tablets to fresh salsa - about 3 grams per quart. It's main function is as an anti-oxidant, but also adds some sourness

i think you can find powdered ascorbic acid/vitamin c at your local vitamin shop.

this may be easier to use than vitamin c tablets. also, they don't add sugar to this, so you'll need to add a little less.

in my pastry department, we used a liquid called "fruit acid". i think this is the same thing in liquid form. we use it to balance flavors when making fruit based mixtures like sorbet base, etc.

#11 Brad S

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Posted 27 September 2003 - 04:06 PM

Also look for Jean Andrews "Red Hot Peppers" Macmillan Publishing. Theres great imformation on almost every caspiun as well as wondeful recipes from soups to salsas and very thourough canning instructions.

Edited by Brad S, 27 September 2003 - 04:06 PM.

Turnip Greens are Better than Nothing. Ask the people who have tried both.

#12 twodogs

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 07:56 AM

anyone headed to the aspen food and wine classic 2004 should try out our two hot sauces: smoke and fire and smoke and smolder. they will be given away for half a day at the classic by a pr firm. also present are two caramel corns made from the hot sauces and maple syrup and honey respectively.

enjoy and let us know what you think.

cheers

ps the booth or the name of our establishment is Keyah Grande in Pagosa Springs CO
h. alexander talbot
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Levittown, PA
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#13 balmagowry

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Posted 15 June 2004 - 08:10 AM

I've had wonderful success with the pepper garden this year, and have already produced some beautiful salsa with Cayenne and an early Habanero or two.  However, the Habaneros are really hitting their stride and I won't be able to make enough salsa to contain that heat and still be edible.  so I was thinking a hot sauce would be the way to go.  I'm open to playing around with all kinds of bases, I just don't want these things to go to waste.  Any suggestions?

And, Oh, BTW, blenderless suggestions would be great, since that's what I am.

my grandmother used to make a hot pepper jelly (had sugar in it) and she served it on crakers and toast with cream cheese. bleieve it or not it was great. i will look for the recipe this evening

If it's at all like the hot pepper jelly a friend of mine makes, it'll also be great on vanilla ice cream.

#14 Lan4Dawg

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 07:39 PM

Fuss does a lot of stuff w/ our peppers. My brother brings a grocery bag of Datils up fr/ St. Augustine late in the summer and she uses those along w/ the habaneros, pepins, fingers, jalepenos, &c that we grow on the deck to make jellies, sauces, relishes, &c. Most of the receipts she uses are fr/ the Ball jar company's "Blue Book" or one of the dozen & a half pepper books I have around the house (I collect hot sauces & the kitchen is done in tabasco colors & peppers). If you want a specific receipt e-mail me (lan4d@joimail.com) and I will pass it along rather than bring on the wrath of the copy right gods by posting it here.
One of my favorite things to do is just put the peppers in a jar and cover w/ vinegar then use the vinegar for flavoring. It is exceptionally good on greens, beans, fried catfish, & cornbread.
in loving memory of Mr. Squirt (1998-2004)--
the best cat ever.

#15 Bicycle Lee

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Posted 16 June 2004 - 09:15 PM

make some powder, man... take out the ribs and seeds and use for other applications and use the flesh for powder. That is, if you have enough after your hot sauce. My buddy gave me some habaneros last year and I too was afraid. I harvested them for seed and am growing my own right now.
"Make me some mignardises, &*%$@!" -Mateo

#16 chappie

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Posted 01 September 2004 - 06:46 PM

I think I may have accidentally made a sauce very much like sracha, which I love and happen to be out of at the moment.

Last night I took a few dozen serranos (both red and green) from my father's garden, two anchos, half an onion, two carrots, a pinch of salt, a big clove of elephant garlic and a handful of sugar and boiled the works in cider vinegar (plus a splash of rice-wine vinegar) until the carrots were soft. Oh ... I roasted a red pepper and threw that in there, too.

Blended it, adding a little vinegar to thin it out, and what I've got tastes a lot like sracha only deeper, more complex. Garlicky, subtly sweet and a layered heat with the fruity undertones of the ancho. It's great!

This was the first time I've tried making a cooked hot sauce. Before I used to blend up serranos raw with garlic, salt, vinegar and sometimes fresh carrot juice.

#17 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 10:15 AM

Posted Image



About two years ago my secretary mentioned to me that she has a garden in new jersey. I live in manhattan and dont have the oppurtunity to have a smoker or a garden :sad: So i was very happy to hear this news. Well, since then i have been getting her seeds from everywhere. And her garden is completely overrun. So much infact she complains that her other vegetables are getting spicy :raz: I have had mambosa seeds from Africa, i have gotten. chocolate habeneros, white bullets aka "gringo killers" and so on. I have always made that uncooked sauce made from distilled vinegar, salt, garlic, and a little ketchup and NC bbq sauce.
Well i have about 5 varities ready so far, still waiting for my little bullets and others.. But i definately want to try the cider vinegar and carrot sauce. Thanks for the help.

#18 Toliver

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:22 AM

Well i have about 5 varities ready so far...

Do you happen to know the name of the round guy in the middle of the picture?
My brother has been growing these same peppers (we knicknamed them "cherry bombs") and he hasn't a clue as to what the variety is called. All he knows is they're hot enough to give him instant hiccups if he eats them raw. :laugh:

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'
Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”
– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”


#19 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:29 AM

Cherry bombs.. She told me she has a hot purple ones comming up. She doesnt have a tag on them and doesnt remember..

She really hates peppers and primarily does it for me, but she can pretty much make anything grow. I am anxiously waiting on these white bullets, and this hot purple guy. Can someone tell me is this the hottest pepper in the world?

#20 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:29 AM

And sorry there are six types on the paper towel.

#21 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:30 AM

I mean 7

#22 s'kat

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:31 AM

Chappie, I've got a bunch of serranos piling up in my kitchen. Since I'm almost out of my rooster sauce, I'll give yours a shot. Thanks!

#23 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:31 AM

whats the rooster sauce recipe

#24 chappie

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 11:35 AM

whats the rooster sauce recipe

Read the technique above. As for the sugar, just add to your taste. Sracha is sweet; mine is slightly less sugary but still sweeter than your average sauce. And it's thick like Sracha.

#25 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 01:07 PM

Hypotheticaly,

If someone were to use the restroom, like an hour after handeling one of these peppers. And say hypotheticly the person was to exeperience extreme discomfort afterwards. Is there something someone can use to help themselves in an office environment. :wub:

#26 s'kat

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 01:11 PM

I think milk/dairy is supposed to help that sort of thing.

#27 Daniel

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 01:15 PM

Irritation to the skin

#28 chappie

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 01:18 PM

I think milk/dairy is supposed to help that sort of thing.

HAH! Yeah, that's it ... pour some half-and-half down your pants, or better yet, wrap your hypothetically injured organ in a slice of cheese. Or discreetly have your way with a pint of vanilla ice cream.

Suffer through it. I spent an afternoon cutting habaneros once for pickling, forgot to wash my hands, and went to the bathroom. It burned like hell, but not forever. These kinds of lessons are valuable in life.

#29 ludja

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Posted 02 September 2004 - 02:30 PM

Well i have about 5 varities ready so far...

Do you happen to know the name of the round guy in the middle of the picture?
My brother has been growing these same peppers (we knicknamed them "cherry bombs") and he hasn't a clue as to what the variety is called. All he knows is they're hot enough to give him instant hiccups if he eats them raw. :laugh:

That name might not be too far off the mark; I think they're called "cherry peppers".
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"


#30 Poots

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Posted 07 September 2004 - 06:49 AM

The pepper in question Could be the Cherry Bomb just like you thought. See here:
http://www.chileplan...hButton=Pressed
Yield to Temptation, It may never come your way again.
 --Lazarus Long





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