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Soy Milk in desserts

Dessert

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#31 bloviatrix

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Posted 31 August 2003 - 09:00 PM

"A ginger-flavored crust, coconut pastry cream, and sliced tropical fruits make a tasty pareve tart for the high holidays. Aunt Sadie would approve. It's a Good Thing." -- Martha Stewart Jewish Living

You mean dear old Miriam Stewart. :raz:
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#32 bloviatrix

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Posted 31 August 2003 - 09:24 PM

I have cooked with Edensoy soy milk (which I regard as the least offensive soy milk) with moderate success. Some soy milks have a tendency to split when cooked for a long time, so I usually add them at the end of cooking. I've used them more like I would real cream to finish a sauce or soup than as the base of something like pastry cream, but it's worth a shot. BTW some people vehemently disagree that Edensoy is the least offensive, and I've learned over time that different soy milks can be better for different activities. I think Vitasoy froths better for a soy milk cappuccino (sorry Lesley), for example, but it's not as rich as edensoy. And for some, rice milk or almond milk simply taste better than soy milk.

Go to a natural foods store and buy single-serving containers of soy and other milks, it's the easiest way to sample several types. Then give it a shot and tell us what happens. Maybe you could make a soy pastry cream and a dairy pastry cream and compare them side-by-side if you really want to feel rueful.  :laugh:

I've used Edensoy, Vitasoy and Zen Don soy milks. Mostly I've used them in "creaming" soups and in my pumpkin pie. With all of them, I've learned you have to be careful with the temperature. If they hit a rolling boiling they tend to curdle. Personally, I find the taste of soy milk noxious, so I will try to convince my dear Blovie to do a taste test for me.

Last year I made a soy milk based pastry cream using the recipe in New Jewish Cuisine by Carole Sobell -- I made a raspberry tart. It never thickened as much as I would have liked so the pastry cream ran all over the place when the tart was sliced. I'm not sure if the runniness was due to the recipe or the soy milk. When comparing her recipe to RLB's in The Pie and Pastry Bible and Payard's the big difference other than the soy milk is that her recipe calls for flour as a thickener and RLB and Payard both have cornstarch and butter. I think the lack of butter may have something to do with consistency. I don't know if margerine will have the same effect, and I really don't want to go over-board on the margerine. It's really an awful product.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#33 thebaker

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Posted 01 September 2003 - 06:20 AM

I worked for 1 1/2 years at a kosher (very strict) restaurant.

even thought we did not serve meat I could not use dairy because we where also vegan (at the time)

I dislike soy milk I prefer rice milk or Coconut milk ( which I made because the rabbi did not like any thing we bought )

I made pastry creams and everything and people could not belive they where dairy free.

I have some great recipes for tarts and stuff... just let me know and i dig some up
I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

#34 Suzanne F

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Posted 01 September 2003 - 10:01 AM

Coconut "milk" can be made with water, and usually is. So the canned stuff should be fine to use (not "lite" though; but then I dislike "lite" ANYTHING). Just check the label, or if you make your own, use hot water.

#35 bloviatrix

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Posted 01 September 2003 - 02:55 PM

I worked for 1 1/2 years at a kosher (very strict) restaurant.

even thought we did not serve meat I could not use dairy because we where also vegan (at the time)

I dislike soy milk I prefer rice milk or Coconut milk ( which I made because the rabbi did not like any thing  we bought )

I made pastry creams  and everything and people could not belive they where dairy free.

I have some great recipes for tarts and stuff... just let me know and i dig some up

thebaker, what restaurant did you work at? Was it in New York?

Plus I would love your recipe for pastry cream.

Thus far, I have settled on one dessert. I'm going to make a strawberry and vanilla infused balsamic vinegar sorbet for lunch on saturday which I will serve in martini glasses. This leaves me with the need for a "showpiece" dessert for friday night dinner, and something for sunday lunch. Saturday night will be a light meal, so I don't plan on making a dessert.

I'm considering hosting a big open house on saturday afternoon with about 8 different desserts. Last year I made assorted biscotti/mandel brodt, cookies, a flourless chocolate cake and blueberry tartlets.

I'll be in the kitchen pretty much non-stop for the next few weeks.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#36 thebaker

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Posted 01 September 2003 - 03:38 PM

I worked for 1 1/2 years at a kosher (very strict) restaurant.

even thought we did not serve meat I could not use dairy because we where also vegan (at the time)

I dislike soy milk I prefer rice milk or Coconut milk ( which I made because the rabbi did not like any thing  we bought )

I made pastry creams  and everything and people could not belive they where dairy free.

I have some great recipes for tarts and stuff... just let me know and i dig some up

thebaker, what restaurant did you work at? Was it in New York?

Plus I would love your recipe for pastry cream.

Thus far, I have settled on one dessert. I'm going to make a strawberry and vanilla infused balsamic vinegar sorbet for lunch on saturday which I will serve in martini glasses. This leaves me with the need for a "showpiece" dessert for friday night dinner, and something for sunday lunch. Saturday night will be a light meal, so I don't plan on making a dessert.

I'm considering hosting a big open house on saturday afternoon with about 8 different desserts. Last year I made assorted biscotti/mandel brodt, cookies, a flourless chocolate cake and blueberry tartlets.

I'll be in the kitchen pretty much non-stop for the next few weeks.

The restaurant was in brooklyn.

Wendy's plate
(i dont work there any more)
I will head into the closet and dig out the recipes
I bake there for I am....

Make food ... not war

#37 beans

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 07:28 AM

As for Almond Breezes, I'm not sure if it's kosher.  I'll have to take a look at it.

I was curious too. I got an email just a moment ago from a cust service rep and she assured me Almond Breezes are kosher and are produced using dairy equipment.

I look foreward to thebaker's sharing that pastry cream recipe. :cool:

#38 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 07:48 AM

If it's produced using dairy equipment then it is probably labeled O-U-D, therefore dairy and can't be used for a parve preparation.

#39 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 08:01 AM

Wait, here's a site which researched the answer, "Kosher Labelling: DE (Dairy Equipment - made on the same equipment that processes products with Dairy, but cleaned before processing dairy-free products)." So, I guess it's up to you whether that's parve enough.

#40 bloviatrix

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 08:36 AM

Well, Almond Breezes isn't an option then.

My husband informed me last night that he doesn't want to host an open house this year. Which would mean fewer desserts needed. I'm not sure if I like this idea or not. Planning the desserts is more fun than figuring out all the other menus.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#41 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 09:02 AM

Just to finalize this issue, here's further clarification from Blue Diamond's customer service: "All the cartons of Almond Breeze have the kosher mark a 'D' in a 'box' with a D.E. underneath."

#42 bloviatrix

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Posted 02 September 2003 - 12:25 PM

BTW, thanks for checking out whether AD had a hechsher. You saved me a walk to the store. :smile:
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#43 PastryLady

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 06:24 AM

Correct me if I am wrong, but I thought eggs were considered dairy (???) How the heck could you make tarts with out butter AND eggs? The crust is a short dough (butter and eggs used) and frangi has butter and eggs. I hate to think of margarine used. Also I would skip ice cream, because think of it. You are going to have to explain all night to every person that it doesn't have eggs or milk in it. Then, you will have to describe that it has soy milk...

I deeply commend you for giving this a shot, but pastry with out the staples (sugar, butter, milk, eggs) is difficult in itself and hard to make palate appealing.
Debra Diller
"Sweet dreams are made of this" - Eurithmics

#44 Malawry

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 07:54 AM

Eggs are not considered dairy for kashrut purposes. It's considered "pareve." This means you can serve eggs with either meat or dairy dishes at will.

Also weird but true: fish is pareve.

#45 NeroW

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 11:32 AM

I don't know much about kashrut, but I asked around at school and like Malawry said, eggs are OK.

I've made frangipane with both butter and vegetable shortening for class. I agree with Suzanne that the almond paste more than makes up for any loss of butter flavor.

bloviatrix and jersey13, I will PM the pear-frangipane tart recipe.
Noise is music. All else is food.

#46 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 11:41 AM

Is there any reason it can't go on RecipeGullet? I'd like to try it too.

#47 bloviatrix

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 11:42 AM

I've made frangipane with both butter and vegetable shortening for class.  I agree with Suzanne that the almond paste more than makes up for any loss of butter flavor.

bloviatrix and jersey13, I will PM the pear-frangipane tart recipe.

How does the frangipane with vegetable shortening taste? Did you use Crisco or some other brand. I'll be honest, I've never worked with shortening. But this could be a good time to try. :smile:

Pear and almonds sounds like a perfect combination for early fall.

Edited by bloviatrix, 03 September 2003 - 11:42 AM.

"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#48 beans

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 11:57 AM

Is there any reason it can't go on RecipeGullet? I'd like to try it too.

:wub: Me too!

Oh, I *love* pears. And almonds! Usually I pair up the pears with hazelnuts for Fall though... This thread is sounding more and more delicious as it develops.

#49 nwells

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Posted 04 September 2003 - 02:24 PM

I have a recipe for coconut pastry cream that I love. It is just a susbtitution of 1 cup of coconut milk for 2 cups of 1/2 and 1/2 (not sure why the reduction of liquid). The recipe calls for 1 1/2 cups of sweetened coconut also, but I never put that in because I can't stand the texture of coconut. I would love to try this with some lychee puree, or mango, or...

#50 bloviatrix

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Posted 09 September 2003 - 09:03 PM

Has anyone looked at Ripe for Dessert by David Liebovitz? He's got a couple of recipes that look promising. One is a riff on a pavlova. His recipe calls for a meringue nest with poached strawberries and almonds. Also, several dishes with dates, which are a traditional Rosh Hashana food.

I'm skimmed the book at Barnes & Noble today. I plan on picking it up next week.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#51 Callipygos

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Posted 12 September 2003 - 08:47 AM

Desperately trying to remember -- there is a recipe in the Moosewood "Low-Fat" cookbook for an angelfood cake with a coffee glaze. I remember dogearing the corner one year when a friend was considering holding a seder, because "Hey, this would be kosher and I could bring it and wow that would be fun."

I am desperately right now trying to rememeber whether dairy was involved; I remember thinking of it as kosher because of the lack of leavening agents.

FYI, my knowledge of whether this would work or not is limited because I'm a shiksa. :rolleyes:

#52 Exotic Mushroom

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Posted 12 September 2003 - 11:11 AM

Just wanted to pop in with a dessert suggestion. Rather than trying to use soy milk substitute ice cream, you might want to try something I picked up from a vegan friend of mine. He would take nuts (cashews usually, but any kind will do) and run them in the food processor to have homemade nut butter. He would then sweeten and flavor it with a little bit of maple syrup or whatever other flavoring he felt like, then freeze it. He'd serve it in scoops like ice cream, and I always thought it was a pretty nice dessert.

I feel your frustration with dairy free desserts. My aunt can't have any dairy and I hate cooking dessert when she's over. Sorbets and fruit ices are fine in the summer, but when the weather gets cold, you don't want to serve those anymore. Anyway, I've served nut butter ice cream with margaraine based molten chocolate babycakes a few times with her and it has always been well recieved.

Oh, and for the person who asked about eggs. Dairy comes from cows. Eggs come from chickens. Eggs are not dairy.

#53 Nancy Berry

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 09:36 AM

There's a good recipe for Warm Pineapple Tart with Pineapple-Coconut Sauce at this link. It is best when made with high quality butter-laden puff pastry, but it would still be very good if made with pareve Pepperidge Farm puff pastry.

#54 bloviatrix

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 10:18 AM

That looks yummy. Thanks for the suggestion.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#55 Nancy Berry

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 10:35 AM

You could also use a lemon curd made with unsalted pareve margarine instead of butter as the base for fruits in a tart and then glaze the fruits with some melted apricot or currant jam. That would be delicious.

#56 ik8r2u

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 11:12 AM

I'm a caterer who does all the jewish holidays, one of my best desserts is a flourless chocolate cake its also good for passover

#57 bloviatrix

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 12:19 PM

Welcome to eGullet ik8r2u!

I make a flourless chocolate cake, but I'm getting bored of it. At Passover I served it with strawberries that were infused with a balsamic-vanilla syrup that was a hit.
"Some people see a sheet of seaweed and want to be wrapped in it. I want to see it around a piece of fish."-- William Grimes

"People are bastard-coated bastards, with bastard filling." - Dr. Cox on Scrubs

#58 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 14 September 2003 - 08:24 PM

And I'm open to other ideas (perhaps I need to start a new thread call desserts w/no diary?).

I'm far from traditional when I cook my meals, so the ideas don't have to Jewish in nature.


I am also a frustrated cook who has had to contend with my personal passion for wonderful culinary delights and a spouse who chooses to maintain a high standard of kashrut at home, for some 30+ years, no less ...

so I began to do a lot of experimenting to create pareve desserts worthy (or semi-equal) to the dairy delights that I treasure ... to that end, I have now found a solution for a quick and delightful summer fruit tart in a shortbread shell ...

basically, it utilizes either a homemade shortbread pie shell which is pareve or, much to my delight, a new product made by Mrs. Smith's, which is crisp and tasty when prebaked and can then be filled with fresh peaches and red tart plums, sliced and laid out in concentric (or one multicolored) large circles in the prebaked pie shell ... add a bit of sugar, margarine, almond extract, lemon juice, tapioca and bake ... covered(with a round of foil or parchment) until the last 10 minutes ... top with glaze of melted fruit jelly (red currant or sieved apricot) and it looks lovely and tastes quite fine ... for a pareve dessert ...

also have experimented with a pareve creme anglaise for cream puffs ... not great but religiously correct ....

#59 sherribabee

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 10:12 AM

Back to soy milk...I've done quite a bit of experimenting and I think Silk has the best flavor (esp. vanilla). Soy milk is good paired with nutty flavors, so I'd suggest using it in a hazelnut or almond recipe.
Sherri A. Jackson

#60 capnhank

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Posted 15 September 2003 - 10:44 AM

I've been a fluctuating vegetarian/vegan for several years now and still can't bear the taste of soy milk. I use rice milk for everything, because it tastes like the bottom of the cereal bowl (yum!). True, you can't whip it or anything, but at least it doesn't taste like paste.
For dessert, try a tofu cheesecake. There are plenty of recipes on veggie websites (this for example), but beware! You're usually better off going no-bake. The standard recipe calls for tofu, sugar and fake cream cheese mixed in a blender then baked for a while. I've found that the baking process dries out the mixture and makes it mealy and nasty. You're better off just refrigerating it for a couple hours.
I know it's a far cry from condensed milk and cream cheese, but for those of us who don't suckle at the bovine teat it's pretty darn close.





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