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Popovers!


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#61 andiesenji

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 04:47 PM

 

oddly, cheaper at amazon:

 

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B003YL3DWO

 

 

 

I'm not sure it's the same pan.  Amazon is frequently light on clear and complete descriptions. 

 

It's the same pan that I have.  I just weighed mine - 1 lb. 13 oz.  so the shipping weight (2 pounds) shown is correct.   And as I mentioned earlier, if you look and feel of the interior of these cups, it will not seem like "non-stick" coating.   I have a lot of Chicago Metallic bakeware, including some cake pans that are at least 30 years old - had them prior to moving up here 25 years ago and I still use them, same with my sheet pans and 1/2 size sheet pans. 


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#62 Shel_B

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 05:00 PM

 

 

oddly, cheaper at amazon:

 

http://www.amazon.co...r/dp/B003YL3DWO

 

 

 

I'm not sure it's the same pan.  Amazon is frequently light on clear and complete descriptions. 

 

It's the same pan that I have.  I just weighed mine - 1 lb. 13 oz.  so the shipping weight (2 pounds) shown is correct.   And as I mentioned earlier, if you look and feel of the interior of these cups, it will not seem like "non-stick" coating.   I have a lot of Chicago Metallic bakeware, including some cake pans that are at least 30 years old - had them prior to moving up here 25 years ago and I still use them, same with my sheet pans and 1/2 size sheet pans. 

 

 

Just returned from BB&B, disappointed.  The BB&B site said my local store had the pans in stock, but that wasn't the case when I got to the store.  None were on display, none were in the stockroom.  Salesman said it would be two weeks, +/-, before the pan was in stock.  So, it's good to know the Amazon pan is the same, and I'll order from there tomorrow.  Thanks!


.... Shel


#63 Shel_B

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 07:08 PM

Do you think kefir can be used successfully instead of milk for popovers?  What about buttermilk?  What, if anything, might have to be changed in a given recipe?


Edited by Shel_B, 01 January 2014 - 07:09 PM.

.... Shel


#64 andiesenji

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Posted 01 January 2014 - 09:55 PM

I've never used anything but milk.  I wouldn't use buttermilk because the acid might keep the batter from puffing as desired because buttermilk produces a much more tender "crust" on other baked goods and that's not what you want in a popover.

 

I would make them with a traditional recipe a few times, and then try some experiments. 

 

This informative article from The Kitchn  should help some.


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#65 Shel_B

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Posted 02 January 2014 - 12:58 AM

I've never used anything but milk.  I wouldn't use buttermilk because the acid might keep the batter from puffing as desired because buttermilk produces a much more tender "crust" on other baked goods and that's not what you want in a popover.

 

I would make them with a traditional recipe a few times, and then try some experiments. 

 

This informative article from The Kitchn  should help some.

 

Thanks!  I'd been to the site but didn't see that page.  You're right, of course, about starting with the basics.  I was more curious than anything, and I already have a "traditional" recipe to start with.  Just waiting for a pan, of which I have none.  Hmmm ... just got an idea for a pan, which I may be able to use this weekend.


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.... Shel


#66 Shel_B

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 11:38 AM

Trying to decide on a popover pan.  I'm considering two.  There's this one: 

 

http://www.amazon.co...rds=popover pan

 

and this one:

 

http://www.amazon.co...are popover pan

 

Any comments or suggestions on these (or other) choices?


.... Shel


#67 gfweb

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 11:46 AM

Probably equivalent. Not sure which would be easier to clean.



#68 rotuts

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:04 PM

personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic      Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

 

and its cheaper  !!!



#69 Dave the Cook

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:09 PM

personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic      Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

 

and its cheaper  !!!

 

. . . and dishwasher-safe.


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#70 Shel_B

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 12:24 PM

 

personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic      Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

 

and its cheaper  !!!

 

. . . and dishwasher-safe.

 

 

Being able to put a pan in the dishwasher is a non-issue, FWIW.


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#71 Dave the Cook

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 01:01 PM

 

 

personally Id go w the Chicago Metallic      Ive had very good luck with them but not this actual pan

 

and its cheaper  !!!

 

. . . and dishwasher-safe.

 

 

Being able to put a pan in the dishwasher is a non-issue, FWIW.

 

 

 

It's an issue for me, and no doubt many others who might be considering the purchase of a popover pan.


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#72 dcarch

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 07:27 PM

Trying to decide on a popover pan.  I'm considering two.  There's this one: 

 

http://www.amazon.co...rds=popover pan

 

and this one:

 

http://www.amazon.co...are popover pan

 

Any comments or suggestions on these (or other) choices?

 

Based on reviews, clearly you should not buy the first one.

 

dcarch



#73 Shel_B

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Posted 06 January 2014 - 10:12 PM

I went ahead and ordered the Nordic Ware ... good price (a few $$ less than shown on the page below plus free shipping):

 

http://www.chefscata...-pan-51748.aspx


.... Shel


#74 Shel_B

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:11 AM

What Makes Perfect Popovers?

 

This morning I found this article on Sfgate and thought some people might find it useful or the recipes of some interest.

 

http://www.sfgate.co...ers-4601293.php


.... Shel


#75 rotuts

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 08:12 AM

interesting

 

and that's the chicago metallic pop over tray !


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#76 Katie Meadow

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 10:46 AM

What Makes Perfect Popovers?

 

This morning I found this article on Sfgate and thought some people might find it useful or the recipes of some interest.

 

http://www.sfgate.co...ers-4601293.php

For the record I tried this SF Chron recipe last summer when that article appeared. It is very eggy, and I prefer my popovers less so. I don't know if it would have been better with just 2 eggs instead of 3, but I didn't try it again.


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#77 Shel_B

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 10:51 AM

 

What Makes Perfect Popovers?

 

http://www.sfgate.co...ers-4601293.php

 

For the record I tried this SF Chron recipe last summer when that article appeared. It is very eggy, and I prefer my popovers less so. I don't know if it would have been better with just 2 eggs instead of 3, but I didn't try it again.

 

 

That's good to know - about the egginess - perhaps exchanging a whole egg for the whites might also help - just thinking aloud ...


.... Shel


#78 lochaven

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Posted 07 January 2014 - 09:25 PM

Thanks for the recipe Shel_B.

 

No big deal for me if the popover pan goes in the dishwasher.  Mine goes in all the time and works fine after a good soak.

 

My motto is, if stuff can handle a 400 degree oven and if it can't handle an occasional dishwasher run -- then, out it goes.  No big deal.


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#79 dcarch

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 05:58 AM

Thanks for the recipe Shel_B.

 

No big deal for me if the popover pan goes in the dishwasher.  Mine goes in all the time and works fine after a good soak.

 

My motto is, if stuff can handle a 400 degree oven and if it can't handle an occasional dishwasher run -- then, out it goes.  No big deal.

 

It is not the temperature, and it is not the detergent which can damage the coating.

 

It is the possible of banging and abrasion from other items when agitated by high speed water jets which can scratch the non-stick surface.

 

dcarch 



#80 Shel_B

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 10:30 AM

Flour Choice for Popovers:  I've read that AP flour is fine for popovers, and I've also come across some recipes and articles that suggest using bread flour.  What are your thoughts on the best choice for popovers if the desired result is good height and a degree of lightness.

 

Trader Joe's AP flour contains malted barley flour (or some such similar description).  I don't know how much it contains.  Could the addition of barley flour effect the results when used in popovers, and how so?

 

Thanks!


.... Shel


#81 heidih

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 05:46 PM

Trader Joe's AP flour contains malted barley flour (or some such similar description).  I don't know how much it contains.  Could the addition of barley flour effect the results when used in popovers, and how so?


I believe malted barley flour is a common ingredient in all purpose flours. With the purpose of promoting rise and browning it would seem to be a positive for your application. The diastatic malt powder is often added by bakers http://www.kingarthu...lt-powder-16-oz
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#82 Shel_B

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 06:12 PM

I believe malted barley flour is a common ingredient in all purpose flours. With the purpose of promoting rise and browning it would seem to be a positive for your application. The diastatic malt powder is often added by bakers http://www.kingarthu...lt-powder-16-oz

 

I noticed the ingredient listed on a bag of KA four today. and figured it couldn't be too bad.  KA flour seems to have a good reputation.  Thanks for explaining what it does.


Edited by Shel_B, 08 January 2014 - 06:13 PM.

.... Shel


#83 janeer

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Posted 08 January 2014 - 08:32 PM

You can make a popover in most anything. Here are some made in ceramic cups http://littlecompton...-champagne.html
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#84 andiesenji

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Posted 09 January 2014 - 01:11 PM

I went with a friend to a restaurant in Costa Mesa a few years ago that served  giant cheesy popovers that were baked in large coffee mugs.

And they were served right in the mugs.  They were the same size mugs in which they served caffe lattes. 


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#85 Shel_B

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 06:29 PM

I went with a friend to a restaurant in Costa Mesa a few years ago that served  giant cheesy popovers that were baked in large coffee mugs.

And they were served right in the mugs.  They were the same size mugs in which they served caffe lattes. 

 

I want to try making a small batch in mugs in the Breville oven.  I can't fit my new popover pan in the small Breville, but the oven can  certainly hold a couple-three coffee mugs.

 

Meanwhile, I used your recipe to make a batch this afternoon - in fact, they're still in the oven, got another ten minutes or so to go.  My-O-My, they sure did rise high, popovers reaching up to the sky ... and it looks like they are going to turn out just fine.  Unfortunately, filling the cups about half full allowed for only five popovers.  No big deal, but a bit of a surprise.  I can see the scenario for the next batch: more batter filling six of the pan's cups, plus extra to make in the Breville.

 

Mmmm ... the apartment smells so good right now.

 

Thanks for all your help with this project.

 

ETA: Oh, I should add that instead of regular butter or shortening, I used some homemade lavender-infused ghee, and the subtle flavor notes from the lavender add a nice quality to the lightness of the ppovers.


Edited by Shel_B, 13 January 2014 - 07:27 PM.

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.... Shel


#86 Shel_B

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Posted 13 January 2014 - 07:00 PM

Well, here's my first batch of popovers ... they sure did Pop! and they are very light and airy.

 

Popovers on Cutting Board.jpg

 

 


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.... Shel


#87 Shel_B

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 08:42 AM

Popover Problems:  Having had a chance to examine carefully my results, it's clear there were some problems with the popovers I made.  First, I could only get five popovers from andiesenji's recipe, and that's a puzzlement to me.  I filled the cups in the pan to between 1/2 and 2/3 the way full.  Actually, the first cup I filled was about 2/3 the way full and the rest closer to half.  Any thoughts on why I couldn't get six popovers from the recipe? Might the cups in my pan have had more capacity than those in andiesenji's pan?

 

Of bigger concern is how thin the popovers were.  Of course the popovers were light and airy - they were completely hollow and the crust was very thin to the point where I could actually see through the crust on a couple of the popovers.  There was a very thin layer of custardy innards which had a good texture and taste, but there wasn't much of it at all.  My first thought was that I didn't use enough flour, having sifted the flour into the measuring cup.  The next time I make these I'll add some more flour, perhaps two tablespoons more.  Might that be a step towards correcting the problem?

 

Finally, two of the popovers actually had a small, circular hole in their bottom, big enough that I could insert the tip of my little finger into it.  What's that all about?

 

ETA: I should mention that I used 1 cup low fat milk, 1 (sifted) cup of flour, 2 beaten eggs, 1.5 tsp salt, and 1 Tbs melted ghee, plus some vegetable oil to grease the cups.  Preheated the pan before adding the batter, baked at 450°-F for about 15-minutes, reduced heat to 350°-F and continued baking until the popovers were nicely browned, about 20-minutes more, +/-

 

Any thoughts on what went wrong, suggestions on how to correct the problems?  Thanks!


Edited by Shel_B, 15 January 2014 - 09:17 AM.

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.... Shel


#88 Ann_T

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 09:00 AM

I've always thought of popovers and Yorkshire puddings as basically the same.  The only difference was the addition of a little melted butter to the batter for popovers.

If I want popovers for breakfast I just use the same recipe that I use for Yorkshire PUdding.

 

One cup flour, one cup milk, three eggs and salt. 

8th of a inch of drippings or fat in the bottom of each cup, heated until smoking hot. Pour in the batter and bake about 25 minutes at 450°F.

 

 

 

Yorkshire%20Puddings%20December%2026th%2


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#89 dcarch

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 10:58 AM

And this is what you'll get, using popover dough to make pizza. Not bad actually.

 

Interesting the dish shape happened naturally.

 

dcarch

 

popoverpizza2.jpg

 

popoverpizza3.jpg


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#90 andiesenji

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Posted 15 January 2014 - 02:25 PM

Popover Problems:  Having had a chance to examine carefully my results, it's clear there were some problems with the popovers I made.  First, I could only get five popovers from andiesenji's recipe, and that's a puzzlement to me.  I filled the cups in the pan to between 1/2 and 2/3 the way full.  Actually, the first cup I filled was about 2/3 the way full and the rest closer to half.  Any thoughts on why I couldn't get six popovers from the recipe? Might the cups in my pan have had more capacity than those in andiesenji's pan?

 

Of bigger concern is how thin the popovers were.  Of course the popovers were light and airy - they were completely hollow and the crust was very thin to the point where I could actually see through the crust on a couple of the popovers.  There was a very thin layer of custardy innards which had a good texture and taste, but there wasn't much of it at all.  My first thought was that I didn't use enough flour, having sifted the flour into the measuring cup.  The next time I make these I'll add some more flour, perhaps two tablespoons more.  Might that be a step towards correcting the problem?

 

Finally, two of the popovers actually had a small, circular hole in their bottom, big enough that I could insert the tip of my little finger into it.  What's that all about?

 

ETA: I should mention that I used 1 cup low fat milk, 1 (sifted) cup of flour, 2 beaten eggs, 1.5 tsp salt, and 1 Tbs melted ghee, plus some vegetable oil to grease the cups.  Preheated the pan before adding the batter, baked at 450°-F for about 15-minutes, reduced heat to 350°-F and continued baking until the popovers were nicely browned, about 20-minutes more, +/-

 

Any thoughts on what went wrong, suggestions on how to correct the problems?  Thanks!

Your popovers look lovely. 

 

I can't give you a real answer until I try making a batch using your method.  I've never had a problem getting 6 popovers - it's possible the pan I have has cups that are narrower at the bottom or I put a bit less in each cup. I but a bit in each cup and then go back and add more so there is an even amount of batter in each cup.  

They do have thin walls with big holes inside - which is what I expect with popovers - especially when I want to fill them.

 

I can't explain the hole in the bottom - mine have a hole in the side where I perforate them to let the hot air escape. 


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