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Hyperimmune Egg - as an ingredient


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#1 abc4all

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 06:00 AM

Looking for ideas on using hyperimmune egg as an ingredient in a recipe or for persons interested in creating such items for a health-oriented restaurant. Note it cannot be heated, and the recipe has to be at least room temperature (deviled eggs or frosting on a baked item) or colder (in a juice smoothie). I have written an article: Immunization Versus Immunity Via Hyperimmune Egg: http://www.holisticj...icle.cfm?ID=105
Thanks for your ideas!

#2 Katherine

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 11:51 AM

I tried to follow the link in the article you wrote, but I got an error message saying that the account had been disabled by the security department.

I am familiar with immunized eggs and antibodies, having worked in a biotech immunology lab. Provided these eggs are still available to you, you should concentrate on the type of foods that contain raw eggs. Stuffed eggs are always cooked, and frosting that contains egg whites is usually prepared with a hot sugar syrup.

What is the food philosophy of this restaurant? Are they vegan, or all-raw, or do they serve organic animal products? What about sugar?

Smoothies are a good place to hide whole raw eggs. Chocolate mousse can be lightened with whipped egg whites, and some people put raw egg yolks in desserts like these, but I find the taste unattractive.

Steak tartare usually comes with an egg yolk on it.

Aside from these, I can't think of any way I would serve completely raw whole eggs.

#3 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 11:53 AM

what are these eggs immune to?

i'm sort of confused because i have no idea what these are.

Edited by tryska, 11 August 2003 - 11:53 AM.


#4 Katherine

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 12:14 PM

what are these eggs immune to?

i'm sort of confused because i have no idea what these are.

I was hoping to find that information out on the hyperimmune site, but it doesn't work.

They should be immune to whatever they innoculated them with, at least in theory, provided they have developed a successful production procedures and have quality control at the facility. Inoculating raw eggs is a standard procedure for growing antibodies.

So one issue is what type(s) of antibodies they are trying to grow in these eggs, and whether they succeeded.

Whether eating these eggs would transfer immunity to the eater is a different question.

In the absence of solid data, it sounds like something of a faith issue to me.

Edited by Katherine, 11 August 2003 - 12:14 PM.


#5 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 12:20 PM

i would think not, since it's going through the digestive system.


i mean..conferring immunity to eggs via inoculation isn't exactly the same as nanotech orange juice....

if the the eggs themselves can't be kept warmer than room temperature, once they get inside the digestive tract, i'm guessing, all hope is lost.


edit - that doesn't even make sense from an immunological standpoint - unless one has a ulcers or leaky gut syndrome or some other inflammatory bowel condition in which sweeper cells could create antibodies from the eggs. (at least that's if i understand the immuen system correctly)


without solid data i would have to call the hyperimmune egg idea bunk. unless it means since the egg is hyperimmune if they grow into chickens they won't need antibiotics. in which case i'm all for it, but i'm thinking that's not the case.

Edited by tryska, 11 August 2003 - 12:23 PM.


#6 Katherine

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 12:25 PM

i would think not, since it's going through the digestive system.


i mean..conferring immunity to eggs via inoculation isn't exactly the same as nanotech orange juice....

if the the eggs themselves can't be kept warmer than room temperature, once they get inside the digestive tract, i'm guessing, all hope is lost.

What's nanotech orange juice?

The eggs we used to work with in the lab were purchased, already inocculated with a material that caused them to develop antibodies to a common animal disease. The eggs were processed (long, complicated procedure I did many times) and the antibodies were harvested and manufactured into test kits for the disease.

So it can and does work growing antibodies in eggs. The other questions are not answerable at this point, and I feel probably never will be.

#7 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 12:27 PM

or in reading the very hazy attached article - maybe the eggs have soem sort of nutritional "immune system toners" as it were?

i really wish the "security department" hadn't got rid of the hyperimmune webpage. *lol*

#8 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 12:32 PM

i would think not, since it's going through the digestive system.


i mean..conferring immunity to eggs via inoculation isn't exactly the same as nanotech orange juice....

if the the eggs themselves can't be kept warmer than room temperature, once they get inside the digestive tract, i'm guessing, all hope is lost.

What's nanotech orange juice?

The eggs we used to work with in the lab were purchased, already inocculated with a material that caused them to develop antibodies to a common animal disease. The eggs were processed (long, complicated procedure I did many times) and the antibodies were harvested and manufactured into test kits for the disease.

So it can and does work growing antibodies in eggs. The other questions are not answerable at this point, and I feel probably never will be.

ahh - your way makes much more sense - to harvest the antibodies from the eggs. not eating them in hops of absorbing the antibodies.


nanotechnology is soemthing i haven't delved into in any depth myself, but was explained to me by someone studying it as: teeny tiny robots that can do all sorts of things in the body. (like fight cancer and other systemic diseases) it's the hush hush future of modern medicine in the belief of my friends and acquaintances who are up on it. it's fascinating stuff, but i haven't had the time to delve really - here's a link that you might find interesting tho....

http://www.foresight.org/Nanomedicine/

#9 Katherine

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:00 PM

or in reading the very hazy attached article - maybe the eggs have soem sort of nutritional "immune system toners" as it were?

i really wish the "security department" hadn't got rid of the hyperimmune webpage.  *lol*

I searched and found the website: hyperimmune eggs

"Hyperimmune" eggs (or "immune" eggs) are obtained from chickens repeatedly inoculated with a multivalent collection of pathogens, usually bacterial in nature. Some of the organisms utilized in combination have been Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Salmonella. typhimurium, Pseudomonas. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus simulans, Hemophilus. influenzae, Shigella dysenteriae.

Most of these are disease organisms we are not commonly exposed to. The claim is that these eggs develop immunological characteristics that transfer protection to the body to help it fight other conditions as well.

There's some research here. I think you have to view it pretty critically. In "Effect of Immune Egg on Serum Cholesterol in Rabbits on Atherogenic Diets" (abstract only) they fed 35 rabbits with a diet designed to give them plaque buildup in their arteries. The diet was not described in the abstract. They then broke them into groups. The control group got water, while the test groups got hyperimmune egg, either unheated or heated. The researchers concluded that consuming the hyperimmune egg equivalent of one egg a day helped to control the cholesterol levels of the rabbits, and more worked better.

An issue here is that they didn't have a control using non-hyperimmune eggs. So if the theory is that the miraculous egg properties get denatured by heating, and yet there is still an effect, the results could have been attributed to eggs themselves. But they didn't control for this.

Another issue is the size of a rabbit. How much do you suppose that a lab rabbit weighs, 10 pounds? So a man who weighed 200 pounds would have to eat 20 of these eggs every day to get the minimum effect that they found. Sounds like a lot of issues. Hmm...

There are some articles listed concerning human research, but it looks like they didn't use hyperimmune eggs per se, and most of them were using cow's milk antibodies or researching rotavirus.

#10 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:11 PM

so at best these eggs are good for raw use, since you don't have to worry about getting salmonella from them. at least that's my take on it.



i would be curious about the rabbits diet as well - i wonder what was fed to them in the first place, because, and correct if i'm wrong, rabbits are herbivores in the first place no? so if they had high cholesterol levels, and were given an egg, which would be unnatural for them to eat in the first place, and also has cholesterol of it's own, their bodies should down-regulate cholesterol production of it's own, since dietary cholesterol is present. so that could account for a drop in serum cholesterol.


i'm just being critical of the study tho - no way to tell for sure if that's accurate - i do agree an animals tudy of that type doesn't translate well to human beings - especially when you consider the herbivore v omnivore issue.

Edited by tryska, 11 August 2003 - 01:11 PM.


#11 Katherine

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:39 PM

so at best these eggs are good for raw use, since you don't have to worry about getting salmonella from them.  at least that's my take on it.

I didn't see anything on that website about these eggs being free of the salmonella that can infect store-bought eggs. The antibodies they contain would likely be unable to interact with contamination in or on the egg. Another article of faith?

#12 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:45 PM

*lol* me either - i was trying to extrapolate in a positive way.


so basically they're just eggs.

from chickens with super duper immune systems (altho i hesitate to call them healthy).

edit - altho it does say ont he site that "the oral administration of such eggs passively transfers specific immunoglobins that are prophylactic or therapeautic in nature and provide differing degrees of gastrointestinal protection.....against the specific pathogens."


maybe not a very far cry for those pathogens that are int he digestive tract - ie listeria, salmonella and e. coli but a bit of a stretch in my mind when it comes to strep or staph infections.

Edited by tryska, 11 August 2003 - 01:49 PM.


#13 abc4all

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:45 PM

Thank you for your replies. I will clarify, hopefully, your questions below.

I am not sure why Katherine received a message saying that "the account had been disabled by the security department" as all the links work from my computer including with the "refresh" command and starting a new browser. Perhaps you might try again?
Please let me know if further trouble occurs at abc4all@att.net (thanks).

"You should concentrate on the type of foods that contain raw eggs:" Hyperimmune eggs (which I refer to in my article) are in the form of a powder which is easily mixed with other cold or room temperature ingredients, with no cooking needed. The recipe would need to be created to take this into account (e.g. with a cream cheese base?). Since I am not a professional chef, I am interested in generating ideas from those who might be interested in helping to support the concepts needed to generate a restaurant that would offer strictly healthy foods.

"What is the food philosophy of this restaurant?" It does not exist yet! I am hoping to enlist the interest and expertise of a restauranteur/entrepreneur who might focus on hyperimmune egg, once its incredible health benefits are realilzed. The future restaurant in question could also offer other healthy food stuffs from other organic sources, etc., in keeping with the theme of helping people reach "health heights" via improving their general immunity.

"Smoothies are a good place to hide whole raw eggs." Again, hyperimmune eggs in question are a powder and not in "raw form." They are, however, pure egg, labled "Egcel."

"Aside from these, I can't think of any way I would serve completely raw whole eggs." Since hyperimmune eggs are in powder form, please review your thinking! Perhaps you could start again with the clarifications being provided? Thanks so much for your responses so far...

Tryska asks, "What are these eggs immune to?" This is well-explained in the article found here: http://www.holisticj...icle.cfm?ID=105
with additional explanation here: http://www.HyperimmuneEgg.org

If that originally posted article link still does not work for any reason, here is another that also works from my end for you to try:
http://www.designing...ness/index.html

"So one issue is what type(s) of antibodies they are trying to grow in these eggs, and whether they succeeded." This is a good question, and the answer can be provided by all the ressearch reports found here: http://www.HyperimmuneEgg.org

Additional questions more related to the research/development and scientifica aspects of hyperimmune egg (Egcel) can be raised here at the Holistic Junction Forum on Immunity and Hyperimmune Egg:
http://www.holisticj...es.cfm?catid=95

Either I or Dr. Hellen Greenblatt, immunologist/microbiologist and one of the developers over a 20-year research period and a foremost authority on hyperimmune egg, will be able to address the questions.

"Whether eating these eggs would transfer immunity to the eater is a different question. In the absence of solid data, it sounds like something of a faith issue to me. " Your caution here is well taken, and your review of the research site may offer clarification for you at http://www.HyperimmuneEgg.org (and any questions posed to Dr. Greenblatt you may wish to bring up as well). Please address remaining questions here or at the Forum on Hyperimmune Egg at HolisticJunction.com.

Tryska's comments in her next posts may also be clarified by the above.

Thanks all for launching this discussion!

#14 Bux

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:49 PM

Deviled eggs confused me too, if these were raw eggs we were supposed to be working with. Deviled eggs as an example of an egg that was never exposed to heat is not the way to suggest this is the work of qualified scientists. Anyway, proper mayonnaise is made from raw eggs and good oil, preferrably extra virgin olive oil. No heat for the egg or the oil.
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#15 tryska

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Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:56 PM

abc4all - thanks for the reply, i'm having difficulty making the leap from eggs that have gotten immunofactors from their mothers to using those eggs in humans...could you explain how this works within the digestive tract of a human being?


(i'm a big fan of neutraceutical, and alternative medicine, but still am not sure - also an abstract can't tell me what i really need to know as far as the studies are concerned.)