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Mai Tai Recipes


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#61 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 22 October 2013 - 10:29 PM

I'll list how got there in roughly chronological order.
Should note, these aren't the only combos I tried, but the ones that best represent the lineage of my thinking.
 

Adam,
Thanks for taking the time to share your thought process. I think that's really cool. I don't have access to the same rums otherwise I would try your version in a heartbeat.
My experiments went in a different direction because I went with the Appleton 12 early on and it has plenty of depth. Then it was just a matter of pairing it with a compatible aged agricole. I tried a few and some were surprisingly too tame to add much interest to the drink. I really like it with La Favorite vieux rhum because it is still a bit rough around the edges like a white agricole, and complements the Appleton amazingly well.

I recently bought a bottle of the Clement VSOP based on the recommendation from Rumdood and after trying it at Tiki Oasis. Also I had a chance to try his version of the Mai Tai at 320 Main a few times and it is quite good. (They use Clement VSOP + Appleton Reserve + Clement creole shrubb.) But I haven't had a chance to crack open the bottle of Clement yet.

#62 Kerry Beal

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 04:57 AM



The original was actually a 17 year aged Wray and Nephew, which makes me REALLY want to try barrel aging some WN Overproof.

 

Try this quick aging your WN - finishes on post 212 I think.  It was lovely.



#63 Rafa

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 05:43 AM

Adam,

 

Your search for a proper high proof dark Jamaican rum reminds me of The Dead Rabbit's quest for a molasses-intensive, dunder-funky Jamaican rum in the late 19th Century style. They also settled on a blend. Unfortunately I haven't been able to get anyone to tell me the ratios they use, but the rums are Smith & Cross, Banks 7, and Cruzan Blackstrap. I imagine mixed with a white agricole it'd also make for a hell of a Mai Tai. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#64 EvergreenDan

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 06:53 AM

Tiki = Tacky. Admit it and move on.


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#65 Hassouni

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 08:04 AM

Tiki = Tacky. Admit it and move on.

The drinks by themselves are not...



#66 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 09:10 AM

Tiki = Tacky. Admit it and move on.

You need to relax, man. Tiki is not just about the drinks, it's a state of mind.


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#67 Rafa

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 09:25 AM

Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. 


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#68 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 10:34 AM

Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. 

Too much negativity around here. I am going back to tiki-land.



#69 Rafa

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 10:41 AM

 

Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. 

Too much negativity around here. I am going back to tiki-land.

 

 

Where the rum's always flowin', the slide guitar's always ringin', and the luau girls sway softly on the sands.

 

In the distance, Dan revs his BMW's engine and harshes everyone's mellow.


Edited by Rafa, 23 October 2013 - 10:42 AM.

DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#70 Hassouni

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 10:57 AM

 

 

Yeah, well, that's just, like, your opinion, man. 

Too much negativity around here. I am going back to tiki-land.

 

 

Where the rum's always flowin', the slide guitar's always ringin', and the luau girls sway softly on the sands.

 

In the distance, Dan revs his BMW's engine and harshes everyone's mellow.

 

 

Can I rev my BMW engine and stay mellow? 



#71 Rafa

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:00 AM

Dancing luau lady on the dashboard a must.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#72 Hassouni

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 11:06 AM

I'd prefer a Jack Sparrow figurine, as he kicked off my rum obsession at the impressionable age of 18


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#73 Kerry Beal

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 03:06 PM

 

You are welcome but did you call my Mai Tai glasses tacky?! In any case, they are 14 oz glasses (available here if anyone's interested). As Kerry already responded, 11 1/2 glasses are probably going to be a bit small for a Mai Tai (but are perfect for an old-fashioned). 

 

 

 

I love those glasses!  I covet those glasses!  I look for glasses just like those in every thrift store I find.  If they are tacky - I'd be thrilled to be Tiki-tacky.  



#74 Rafa

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 03:12 PM

I'd prefer a Jack Sparrow figurine, as he kicked off my rum obsession at the impressionable age of 18

 

I remember wondering what the rum he gulped out of barrels tasted like. I guess something like Pusser's or Smith & Cross. It would probably make a good Mai Tai.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#75 Hassouni

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Posted 23 October 2013 - 04:21 PM

 

I'd prefer a Jack Sparrow figurine, as he kicked off my rum obsession at the impressionable age of 18

 

I remember wondering what the rum he gulped out of barrels tasted like. I guess something like Pusser's or Smith & Cross. It would probably make a good Mai Tai.

 

 

Pussers, Smith & Cross, Sea Wynde...MAYBE Scarlet Ibis



#76 EvergreenDan

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 08:18 AM

Not being negative. Tiki is tacky. That's the fun, right? I don't see Jeff Lewis doing his houses with thatched-roof bars and faux tiki gods.

 

And an in-line six never harshes anyone's mellow. :smile:


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#77 Hassouni

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:28 AM

 

And an in-line six never harshes anyone's mellow. :smile:

 

Hear hear!



#78 EvergreenDan

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 11:27 AM


 

And an in-line six never harshes anyone's mellow. :smile:

 
Hear hear!

 

Nice double entendre.


Edited by EvergreenDan, 24 October 2013 - 11:28 AM.

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#79 lesliec

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Posted 24 October 2013 - 09:33 PM

[quote name="Rafa" post="1938007" timestamp="1382566342"][quote name="Hassouni" post="1937938" timestamp="1382551600"]
 
I remember wondering what the rum he gulped out of barrels tasted like. I guess something like Pusser's or Smith & Cross. It would probably make a good Mai Tai.[/quote]

Smoke & Oakum Gunpowder Rum, no question. I could possibly get some to you if you were very nice to me.

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#80 Rafa

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 06:15 AM

What would that require sir?  :smile:


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

 

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#81 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 08:16 PM

Tonight was:

 

2 oz Appleton 12

1/2 oz Grand Marnier

1/2 oz fresh lime juice

3/4 oz Small Hand orgeat

 

 

Garnished with half spent lime and mint.  I have a feeling I will eventually end up closer to a classic Mai Tai recipe as I thought tonight's needed more lime and less orgeat, as much as I am fond of orgeat.  Plus the recipe was still too sweet.

 

Sadly I am running out of Grand Marnier.  I probably will replenish my Grand Marnier but what would people think about using, say, Cointreau?  I like Grand Marnier but I've never tasted Cointreau.  I've also seen a brandy based version of Cointreau.  Is Cointreau less sweet than Grand Marnier?  Which would be better in a Mai Tai?  And why?



#82 lesliec

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:18 PM

Sadly I am running out of Grand Marnier.  I probably will replenish my Grand Marnier but what would people think about using, say, Cointreau?  I like Grand Marnier but I've never tasted Cointreau.  I've also seen a brandy based version of Cointreau.  Is Cointreau less sweet than Grand Marnier?  Which would be better in a Mai Tai?  And why?


Hmm. This may open a debate, but my understanding is that Grand Marnier is officially a Curaçao while Cointreau is a triple sec. The former is brandy (or other brown spirit)-based, while the latter starts with a more neutral spirit. Difference in taste? GM probably richer, maybe slightly sweeter; Cointreau a little lighter. But I can't see why Cointreau wouldn't work. Give it a try.

Or you could look up Jerry Thomas recipe 188 for English Curacoa (his spelling) a d make your own. It's not a complex recipe.

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#83 lesliec

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 09:24 PM

What would that require sir?  :smile:


Well, if you were agreeable I'd propose an exchange of something you can't get for something I can't get. On my side of this bargain, maybe Lemon Hart 151.

Shall we adjourn to the PM system to discuss further? Don't worry if I don't respond immediately; we're away for the weekend and it's slightly tedious doing this on the phone.

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#84 ChrisTaylor

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 10:40 PM

Tonight was:

 

2 oz Appleton 12

1/2 oz Grand Marnier

1/2 oz fresh lime juice

3/4 oz Small Hand orgeat

 

 

Garnished with half spent lime and mint.  I have a feeling I will eventually end up closer to a classic Mai Tai recipe as I thought tonight's needed more lime and less orgeat, as much as I am fond of orgeat.  Plus the recipe was still too sweet.

 

Sadly I am running out of Grand Marnier.  I probably will replenish my Grand Marnier but what would people think about using, say, Cointreau?  I like Grand Marnier but I've never tasted Cointreau.  I've also seen a brandy based version of Cointreau.  Is Cointreau less sweet than Grand Marnier?  Which would be better in a Mai Tai?  And why?

 

I've used both. I prefer Cointreau.

 

EDIT

 

I'd also suggest cutting the Appleton with a rum that has some funk to it. Smith & Cross or Inner Circle.


Edited by ChrisTaylor, 25 October 2013 - 10:41 PM.

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#85 Hassouni

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 11:45 PM

My go to Mai Tai is Appleton 12 and S&C. With Cointreau.  FrogPrincesse I think uses Clement Creole Shrubb, though, as that's rum-based.



#86 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 October 2013 - 11:47 PM

I've used both. I prefer Cointreau.

 

EDIT

 

I'd also suggest cutting the Appleton with a rum that has some funk to it. Smith & Cross or Inner Circle.

 

 

Thanks.  Any other suggestions on the rum?  Neither of those is available locally.



#87 Hassouni

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 12:01 AM

uhhh...Any well-aged Demerara rum available? How about Sea Wynde? Maybe a combo of Myer's and Mount Gay?



#88 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 12:25 AM

Pusser's is available.  Any thoughts on that?



#89 Hassouni

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 12:29 AM

that might do quite nicely



#90 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 October 2013 - 06:19 AM

 

Sadly I am running out of Grand Marnier.  I probably will replenish my Grand Marnier but what would people think about using, say, Cointreau?  I like Grand Marnier but I've never tasted Cointreau.  I've also seen a brandy based version of Cointreau.  Is Cointreau less sweet than Grand Marnier?  Which would be better in a Mai Tai?  And why?


Hmm. This may open a debate, but my understanding is that Grand Marnier is officially a Curaçao while Cointreau is a triple sec. The former is brandy (or other brown spirit)-based, while the latter starts with a more neutral spirit. Difference in taste? GM probably richer, maybe slightly sweeter; Cointreau a little lighter. But I can't see why Cointreau wouldn't work. Give it a try.

Or you could look up Jerry Thomas recipe 188 for English Curacoa (his spelling) a d make your own. It's not a complex recipe.

 

I've decided to play with something resembling Creole Shrub using rum - what do you suppose constitutes 'creole' spices?  Clove, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice?