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What is the one cooking trick


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#91 A Scottish Chef

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Posted 16 July 2003 - 04:37 PM

Also, listening to and learning from better chefs.

Probably the best one.

#92 hamburgerflipper

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Posted 16 July 2003 - 05:15 PM

stopped taking advice from my WIFE!!!!!!!!!!...LOL

#93 DaveFaris

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Posted 17 July 2003 - 08:42 AM

someone with a mac pm'ed me to say they couldn't watch the onion video I uploaded yesterday. Here's an mpeg version which apparently works better, even though it takes twice as long to download (4 megs).

#94 Chef Fowke

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 01:17 AM

I just had an apprentice, Steven Duyzer, come back from a four month tour at a 2 star Michelin restaurant tonight. He gave me the 'new way of making veal jus'! It sounds great and my apprentice says it is the best thing he has every tasted.

I have just finished my sixth course and fourth bottle of wine. I will post the recipe tomorrow. Fat Guy please call me a call if I forget. This recipe is revolutionary (or at least 21st century), Steven says it is like jello, the colour of molasses and is never bitter!

Sorry it took so long to post this recipe. The cruise ships have shown up in Vancouver and we are back to the 500 - 600 dinners a night....


I was taught be many great chefs how to make a proper veal stock. Over the last 17 years I have never, ever swayed one ounce or one degree from my original recipe. Roast bones, Mirepoix, tomato paste...bring to the boil, skim, simmer for eight hours (skimming) and strain through triple cheesecloth. Cool the stock and repeat the process with new roasted bones. To reduce: reduce by half, strain through cheesecloth, repeat until you reach the desire consistence.

Well, this recipe is wrong. Everything I know about cooking is now in question. I tried this new recipe for veal stock over the last two days and I cannot find anything wrong with it. It is so simple and pure and it makes one of the best base veal stocks I have ever tasted! It is as if my taste buds have just been awoken.


Recipe and Technique:

½ veal bones (knuckles) and ½ chicken bones: do not roast!

Put the bones in a kettle and just cover with water. Bring to the boil, drain and rinse with ice and water.

Refill the kettle to just cover the bones. Add a traditional Mirepoix, un-roasted and with ripe, raw tomatoes instead of tomato paste. Simmer for eight hours while skimming. Strain through cheesecloth and cool.

Reduce the stock (no need to strain) until 1/4 the volume. It is like magic, the stock is a beautiful rich golden brown with lots of texture and body. Absolutely no bitterness and lots of gelatin.

On a daily basis the stock can be refreshed with a small Mirepoix and your choice of carcass (roasted duck, lamb, venison, veal, rabbit, etc). The alcohol and bones used really shine through. The flavour is rich while not being over-powering or of a tacky texture.

I guess I need to go back to Europe for a refresher course. This has truly revolutionized my thoughts on cooking. I hope everyone enjoys the recipe!
Chef/Owner/Teacher
Website: Chef Fowke dot com

#95 browniebaker

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 06:26 AM

I finally achieved success in pie-crust pre-baking when I used ENOUGH ceramic pie weights -- a whole pie-plateful. The ceramic pie weights are sold in little packages, never enough to fill an entire pie-plate, so that the edges of my crust always slid downward. I finally went to Bed Bath & Beyond and bought four more packages of Mrs. Anderson's pie weights (that's a brand name). No more slippage, and the pie crust is beautiful.

#96 marie-louise

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 07:14 AM

IrishCream: Here's a little video I made. Maybe it'll help.

onion.avi (2.59 mb)

Thanks, Dave. That video was a major-DUH, why didn't I ever think of that! To think that I was so pleased with myself when I learned the trick of cutting onions (or anything else) in half so that I was cutting something w/ a flat surface. :hmmm: Now I might have something better than rustic-looking dice.

What other chopping tricks do you know?

#97 DaveFaris

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 02:50 PM

Sorry, marie-louise... I just did the video because I couldn't explain the technique verbally. My knife techniques run the gamut from A to B. You might want to pose the question to the eGullet Culinary Institute, though. (Or were you directing your question to everyone?)

#98 gus_tatory

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 02:58 PM

Recipe and Technique:

½ veal bones (knuckles) and ½ chicken bones: do not roast!

Put the bones in a kettle and just cover with water. Bring to the boil, drain and rinse with ice and water.

Refill the kettle to just cover the bones. Add a traditional Mirepoix, un-roasted and with ripe, raw tomatoes instead of tomato paste. Simmer for eight hours while skimming. Strain through cheesecloth and cool.

Reduce the stock (no need to strain) until 1/4 the volume. It is like magic, the stock is a beautiful rich golden brown with lots of texture and body. Absolutely no bitterness and lots of gelatin.

Chef Fowke--
am going to try your veal stock as it sounds fundamental and good. it's interesting, the recipe reminds me of one for Viet Pho (Soupe Tonkinoise) that i have from www.telequebec.tv/aladistasio

going to go find link because the Pho recipe is amazing... :smile:
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."
--Isak Dinesen

#99 gus_tatory

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Posted 18 July 2003 - 03:03 PM

ok, here's the link to the Pho (soupe Tonkinoise) recipe.
Pho recipe

it's in French: should i be sorry or offer to translate?! :blink: :laugh:
gus
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."
--Isak Dinesen

#100 Chef Fowke

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Posted 27 July 2003 - 01:51 AM

ok, here's the link to the Pho (soupe Tonkinoise) recipe.
Pho recipe

it's in French: should i be sorry or offer to translate?!  :blink:  :laugh:
gus

Nice soup. Reminds me of a Pot au feu à la Parisienne with fish sauce. The recipe was very easy to make and turned out great. I am going to add it to my master collection. Thank you.
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Website: Chef Fowke dot com

#101 elyse

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Posted 27 July 2003 - 06:43 AM

Viola - instant peeled garlic.

You can peel garlic on a stringed musical instrument? Wow!

:laugh:

#102 tanabutler

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Posted 04 August 2003 - 05:45 PM

I'll agree with the one about not using table salt for cooking any more. And not using table salt at the table. Kosher flake is my sodium of choice: the crystals are as distinct as good cocaine (she seemed to remember someone saying), though not as expensive.

Also, cooking with unsalted butter most of the time, especially when cooking vegetables. That makes the application of the good salt all the more distinct.

Finally (for now): good knives.

#103 SannisRKHQ

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 03:53 PM

I went to J. Harding Restaurant Supplies and got a nice soup pot and a mandolin ..


I will never go back to slicing my cucumbers again .. Love that little gadget.

#104 NeroW

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 04:04 PM

I went to J. Harding Restaurant Supplies and got a nice soup pot and a mandolin ..


I will never go back to slicing my cucumbers again .. Love that little gadget.

Oh man, be careful with that mandoline . . . them things scare me.
Noise is music. All else is food.

#105 Jinmyo

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 06:26 PM

Yes, mandolines deserve your full attention. But they are the only kitchen gadget other than a knife and a cutting board that is essential.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#106 FoodZealot

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 08:20 PM

Sorry if I missed this, but along with the many great techniques mentioned, but I would add deglazing. Intentionally creating the fond, then loosening up all them brown yummies and NOT throwing them down the sink.

~Tad

#107 tanabutler

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Posted 05 August 2003 - 08:23 PM

You are mighty right, FoodZealot.

#108 davidthomas8779

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 07:27 AM

Recipe and Technique:

½ veal bones (knuckles) and ½ chicken bones: do not roast!

Put the bones in a kettle and just cover with water. Bring to the boil, drain and rinse with ice and water.

Refill the kettle to just cover the bones. Add a traditional Mirepoix, un-roasted and with ripe, raw tomatoes instead of tomato paste. Simmer for eight hours while skimming. Strain through cheesecloth and cool.

Reduce the stock (no need to strain) until 1/4 the volume. It is like magic, the stock is a beautiful rich golden brown with lots of texture and body. Absolutely no bitterness and lots of gelatin.

On a daily basis the stock can be refreshed with a small Mirepoix and your choice of carcass (roasted duck, lamb, venison, veal, rabbit, etc). The alcohol and bones used really shine through. The flavour is rich while not being over-powering or of a tacky texture.

I guess I need to go back to Europe for a refresher course. This has truly revolutionized my thoughts on cooking. I hope everyone enjoys the recipe!

Did I miss the alcohol in the recipe?

#109 NeroW

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 08:45 AM

Yes, mandolines deserve your full attention. But they are the only kitchen gadget other than a knife and a cutting board that is essential.

Aw, come on, Jinmyo . . . what about the *garlic press*?
Noise is music. All else is food.

#110 fresco

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:02 AM

Yes, mandolines deserve your full attention. But they are the only kitchen gadget other than a knife and a cutting board that is essential.

Aw, come on, Jinmyo . . . what about the *garlic press*?

I can't get this image out of my head of a bunch of bored-looking guys in fedoras with a really strong odor about them, shouting "Sweetheart, get me rewrite."
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#111 Jinmyo

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:05 AM

Yes, mandolines deserve your full attention. But they are the only kitchen gadget other than a knife and a cutting board that is essential.

Aw, come on, Jinmyo . . . what about the *garlic press*?

You're kidding, right?

Nothing more useless. I just use the heel of my hand or if I'm feeling fancy the handle of my chef's knife. And I'm usually doing twenty or so cloves if I'm peeling garlic.


fresco, nice.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#112 tryska

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:12 AM

mine would be salting and the joys of broiling with a gas stove.


the broiling bit really has changed things for me the past couple weeks.

Edited by tryska, 12 August 2003 - 09:12 AM.


#113 NeroW

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:17 AM

Yes, mandolines deserve your full attention. But they are the only kitchen gadget other than a knife and a cutting board that is essential.

Aw, come on, Jinmyo . . . what about the *garlic press*?

You're kidding, right?

Nothing more useless. I just use the heel of my hand or if I'm feeling fancy the handle of my chef's knife. And I'm usually doing twenty or so cloves if I'm peeling garlic.


fresco, nice.

Yes. I'm kidding.
Noise is music. All else is food.

#114 Basilgirl

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:39 AM

Using a microplate to grate garlic.

And, not a cooking trick, but logic (which I am not hindered by): keep knives, forks, spoons, cooking implements separated by type in the dishwasher. Makes it twice as fast to put away. Duh.
I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

#115 Rachel Perlow

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:45 AM

But don't you find that the nested utensils (which happens if they are all the same type in the basket) don't get cleaned properly? I love my Miele dishwasher. The flatware goes on its own very shallow tray with tines individually separating each utensil.

#116 mikeycook

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 09:52 AM

Not exactly a cooking trick, but the taste of my cooking has improved greatly since learning that certain foods lose their flavor after time spent in the freezer (fish, chicken, etc.) or the refrigerator (tomatoes, etc.). This has forced me to shop more frequently but has been more than worth it.
"If the divine creator has taken pains to give us delicious and exquisite things to eat, the least we can do is prepare them well and serve them with ceremony."
~ Fernand Point

#117 Basilgirl

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Posted 12 August 2003 - 10:04 AM

But don't you find that the nested utensils (which happens if they are all the same type in the basket) don't get cleaned properly? I love my Miele dishwasher. The flatware goes on its own very shallow tray with tines individually separating each utensil.

My circa-1972 Kenmore (? not sure of brand even) has one large basket with 6 compartments. So far everything's been coming out clean. The machine sounds like a space ship, though. :angry:
I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.

#118 sarah_mc21

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 01:17 PM

For grilling the best things I've learned are start with a HOT grill and stop flipping things a thousand times. One side, then the other - done!

#119 jariggs

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Posted 14 August 2003 - 01:55 PM

Mine is to clean up as you cook as much as possible. It saves a lot of hassle and makes the whole process as sane as possible -- plus you don't have to deal with a mountain of dishes at the end. It's hard to remember to do sometimes though (especially after a little wine).

#120 johan

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Posted 03 September 2003 - 09:32 PM

About that onion chopping: I never did understand why horizontal+vertical slices were better than just the significantly simpler wheel-spoke arc cuts. If you make them alternatingly deep and shallow, you get an even size, and since you're always slicing perpendicular to the onion layer, every cut counts. Using h+v slices you'll be be slicing along the layer for a large part of each cut.

As for tips:
1) Heat the thai chili-paste and oil over medium heat first, then crank up the heat and add meat before the paste burns. Back down on heat when adding coconut milk. Only tested using gas and a thin-walled wok.

2) heat management in general, actually

3) Tomatoes slice easier drawing the knife towards you. I understand this is the Wrong Way to do it. Haven't sliced my finger off. yet.