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Waffles!

Breakfast

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#61 DocDougherty

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 08:46 PM

I was directed to this forum by a search for Liege waffles, but either I missed it or just the waffle part was matched by the search engine. In either case, I am looking for some guidance on how to replicate the waffles that I rember buying on the streets of Brussels. Sweet, yeasty, chewey, dense. I tried some years ago to develop a yeasted waffle recipe but while it was OK, it was not a match to what I remember. And since I am about to start the quest again and I thought I would first query the expertise here before I bumble off on my own.

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#62 decolady

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Posted 17 November 2007 - 08:56 AM

I was directed to this forum by a search for Liege waffles, but either I missed it or just the waffle part was matched by the search engine.  In either case, I am looking for some guidance on how to replicate the waffles that I rember buying on the streets of Brussels.  Sweet, yeasty, chewey, dense.  I tried some years ago to develop a yeasted waffle recipe but while it was OK, it was not a match to what I remember.  And since I am about to start the quest again and I thought I would first query the expertise here before I bumble off on my own.

Doc

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Liege waffles were mentioned earlier in this thread as being from Everybody Eats Well in Belgium Cookbook by Ruth Van Waerebeekand. There is also a photo. It's in a post on the second page of the thread.

Good luck.
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#63 Ce'nedra

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Posted 12 December 2008 - 04:48 AM

First time using our newly bought waffle maker!

These are Vietnamese-style waffles known as Banh Kep La Dua. If anyone's wondering why the waffles have a strange green hue and are wiping their monitor screens, don't. These are pandan waffles :raz:

Did it cheat's way with a box of pancake mix, rice flour, eggs, water (can be replaced with milk but dad's lactose intolerant though he's consumed some dairy products before hmm), sugar and pandan essence.

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#64 QbanCrackr

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 08:08 PM

i wouldn't suppose that the method using the egg whites folded in would keep very well in the refrigerator eh?
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#65 butterscotch

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 08:34 PM

no they will collapse.
but you can keep the whites seperate unwhipped and mix the rest the day before, and whip and fold them in the last minute.
also if there's other leavening, that should go in later too.

#66 QbanCrackr

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Posted 30 November 2010 - 09:28 PM

yea thats what i was thinking =/

just trying to find a good waffle recipe that i can keep over a few days time...i'm volunteering at a local camp and for dessert were having a dessert waffle bar so we want to make it as easy as we can but every waffle batter i've tried comes up floppy and soft...not crunchy like i want em haha

after much reading i see the best way for that maybe the only way is folding in egg whites....how does waffle house do it? i'm sure they just make tons of batter every day right?

do the yeast waffle batters get the same way? or relatively close?
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#67 HowardLi

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Posted 07 December 2010 - 05:37 PM

Does anyone know if a cast-iron stovetop waffe iron would work on an induction stove?

http://www.lehmans.c...&keyword=waffle

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Depends on the iron content. If a magnet will stick to it, it will work. Not very helpful if you're buying it online though.

Cast iron is generally >95% iron.

#68 Dave the Cook

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Posted 08 December 2010 - 01:35 PM

. . .

after much reading i see the best way for that maybe the only way is folding in egg whites....how does waffle house do it? i'm sure they just make tons of batter every day right?

. . .

That is correct. It's a proprietary formula that's mixed with water. Like many chain restaurants, what Waffle House is named for isn't necessarily the best thing on the menu.

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#69 Chris Hennes

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 12:21 PM

Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk
8 T butter
2 cups AP flour
1 T sugar
1 t salt
1 1/2 t yeast
2 eggs
1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).

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#70 caroled

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 07:23 PM

Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk
8 T butter
2 cups AP flour
1 T sugar
1 t salt
1 1/2 t yeast
2 eggs
1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).


Yea,....
I'd say those look pretty damned perfect!
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#71 Frank Ball

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 09:02 PM

The blogger Orangette contributes a great deal of scholarship on the subject, and popularized a recipe named "Waffles of Insane Greatness" -- WIG:

My link

#72 Frank Ball

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 09:03 PM

Correcting link from previous post:

http://orangette.blo...rve-waffle.html

#73 Chris Hennes

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Posted 26 December 2010 - 09:34 PM

Thanks for the link, Frank: I'll have to give Marion Cunningham’s a shot next and see how they stack up: I see that Orangette ranked them ahead of the CI recipe I just tried. The WIG recipe sounds good, too, but I think I'd miss the yeastiness that these raised waffles bring to the table. Plus, with a little planning ahead, making breakfast in the morning is just a matter of heating up the iron and pouring the batter, which in the AM is about all the energy I can muster!

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#74 MelissaH

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 12:07 PM

I've had the best luck using essentially Marion Cunningham's ingredients with the CI overnight-in-the-fridge technique.

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#75 David Ross

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Posted 27 December 2010 - 08:01 PM

Chris-what type of waffle iron do you use? Your waffles are beautiful. I bought a Cuisinart deep waffle iron last year and I love it. I do admit thought that I cheat and don't make my own batter. I've tried making it from scratch using the egg white recipe and while good, it never equals the powdered mix I buy-Carbon's Golden Malted Waffle Mix. It's the old-time diner mix they've been making since 1937. Delicious.

#76 HowardLi

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 06:33 PM

Today I experienced as close to waffle perfection as I have ever gotten. I don't think I achieved "perfect," quite... but damned close:

Waffle Whole.jpg

Waffle Interior.jpg

The recipe was from Cook's Illustrated March/April 2004 issue, and is a yeasted waffle with an overnight refrigerated retardation stage. I think the refrigeration of the batter is CI's main contribution here, the ingredient list is pretty standard:

1 3/4 cup milk
8 T butter
2 cups AP flour
1 T sugar
1 t salt
1 1/2 t yeast
2 eggs
1 t vanilla extract

The method is also pretty standard for a yeasted waffle (e.g. no separating the eggs, etc.): melt the butter with the milk, let cool, combine everything well, then refrigerate overnight. The waffles were very crisp on the outside and finely-texture on the interior, and were very light. They faded pretty fast out of the iron: these were not the sort you want to hold for any length of time. The flavor was yeasty and very reminiscent of brioche, with just the slightest hit of sourness, and quite a bit of vanilla flavor (I was using a homemade vanilla extract, which is quite potent at the moment).

With the overnight refrigeration, doesn't significant gluten formation take place? You have water and flour sitting together for a long time.

#77 Chris Hennes

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Posted 29 December 2010 - 11:18 PM

I did not find the gluten increase problematic: the waffles were very tender. I don't really have a good explanation for that, but yeasted waffles have been around for a long time, and with good reason. I was especially concerned at first when the recipe called for whisking everything together quite vigorously, but it just didn't seem to be an issue.

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#78 Chris Hennes

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Posted 01 January 2011 - 05:44 PM

Tonight for dinner I made the "Waffles of Insane Greatness" linked to above. I used the whole milk option since I don't have any buttermilk at the moment. The WIG recipe has two major departure points from my normal waffles. First, it has a very large amount of cornstarch in it (the flour to cornstarch ratio is 3:1). Second, it uses vegetable oil rather than butter. Here is the waffle that came out:

Waffle of Insane Greatness Whole.jpg

And the interior:

Waffle of Insane Greatness Interior.jpg

I had some trouble getting these waffles to fill out the iron: the batter is very thin, and they didn't want to rise all the way up to the top. I suspect this recipe is better with a non-Belgian iron. Second, the texture of the waffles was quite good, certainly the crispiest I've ever had in a non-yeasted waffle, but I think this came at the expense of flavor: corn starch may be great for crispiness, but it it essentially tasteless. Last, to be honest, I missed the butter. The WIG were fine, for a non-yeasted waffle, and a good option when you want your waffles NOW. But I think several of the recipes up-topic are competitive with these, in particular those that use butter rather than vegetable oil.

Next up: Marion Cunningham's Yeasted Waffles.

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#79 Chris Hennes

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Posted 02 January 2011 - 12:35 PM

Today for lunch I tried to make Cunningham's yeasted waffles, but I must have screwed up the recipe last night, because the batter was much too thin: the waffle I tried to make with the batter as-is did not have enough structure to rise, it simple flowed out the sides of the iron. To salvage the situation I added another half cup or so of flour and beat it in well (my current working theory of waffles is that you actually want gluten formation so that they hold together). These are the waffles that resulted:

Cunningham Waffle Whole.jpg

Cunningham Waffle Interior.jpg

Still a very good waffle, but I have to withhold comparison to the others until I get the actual recipe to turn out correctly.

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#80 David Ross

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Posted 13 February 2011 - 04:35 PM

Chris-what type of waffle iron do you use? Your waffles are beautiful. I bought a Cuisinart deep waffle iron last year and I love it. I do admit thought that I cheat and don't make my own batter. I've tried making it from scratch using the egg white recipe and while good, it never equals the powdered mix I buy-Carbon's Golden Malted Waffle Mix. It's the old-time diner mix they've been making since 1937. Delicious.

Yesterday I made waffles using a recipe that is a take on the Cargon Malted Waffle Mix. The key to the recipe is to used malted milk powder and to fold an egg white into the batter to make it light and airy. The malted milk powder gives the waffles a tangy flavor. Sometimes I substitute buttermilk for regular milk in the batter and it adds to the sweet yet sour flavors in the waffles.

Waffle Maker.JPG

Crisp on the outside and still fluffy in the center.

Waffle.JPG

#81 IndyRob

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Posted 26 May 2011 - 10:36 AM

Having been on an inexplicable frozen waffle kick for a few weeks, I decided to breakdown and buy a Belgian Waffle maker. I found this thread and read through it first.

The recipes provided with the machine were very similar to the ones here so I decided start with those. First I tried a yeasted version and opted to just let it rise at room temp instead of leaving in the refigerator overnight (impatience). The results were okay. A little dense maybe. A few days later I tried the whipped egg white version. The results seemed pretty much the same. In fact, I was impressed by how similar they were. I was pretty sure of my technique, except for the heat setting and the amount of batter I was using. I suspect I'm using a bit too much batter and that's not leaving enough room for expansion.

One thing that struck me was that although there ws a lot of butter in the batter, I didn't feel that the results were all that buttery. I thought the same amount of melted butter poured on top of a baked waffle might be better. Having never had a proper Belgian Waffle, I had no preconception about what it was I was after. So I decided to throw convention to the wind and just start playing.

Thinking of similar baked things, the first thing that came to mind was pate a choux. Could I get a crispy exterior and a very light interior? I tried it, adding an extra egg to loosen the paste. I still had to pipe the dough onto the machine.

Perhaps because of the extra egg, I didn't get a crispy result. But it was eggy and buttery in a good way. Actually, it was a crepe in waffle form (a creffle?). I like crepes, so I may explore that path further.

Later I thought "Hey, what about funnel cake batter?" Looking it up, I discovered the potentially useful bit trivia that funnel cake batter pretty much is waffle batter.

Being generally fascinated by yeast leavened things, I then decided to go minimalist. What if I just poured a poolish in the thing? (a poofle?) Well, I had to find out. I took 150g flour (hi gluten), 200g water, 3g salt, and about a gram of yeast, and mixed it in a measuring cup. I let it bubble up and poured it into the hot waffle maker. It became waffle bread.

I'm still trying to decide what I think about it. It's bread - nice and freshly baked - but in a weird form. Visually, it would fool pretty much anyone (okay, maybe a little light in color). As I chew it, I think "Why isn't this a waffle?" Maybe a bit too chewy, not crisp enough on the outside, needs something in the flavor department....

Hmmm, What if I threw some blueberries in there? An egg? I could let the poolish sour. What if I used pastry flour? Cornstarch would likely help with crispiness.

Or, what if I poured brownie batter into the thing...? :raz:

#82 IndyRob

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Posted 27 May 2011 - 03:43 PM

Hmmm, What if I threw some blueberries in there? An egg? I could let the poolish sour. What if I used pastry flour? Cornstarch would likely help with crispiness.


I followed up my waffle bread experiment with some gut level modifications. Much to my own surprise, I nailed my goals for color and texture - A nicely thin crispy golden brown exterior with a very light, airy, tender, slightly eggy crumb. The flavors could be more complex, but I'll feel very comfortable further developing that aspect. Still, with a pre-planned external application of butter and syrup, these were exactly what I was going for.

For two 7" diameter, 1.5" thick waffles....

75g White Lilly Flour (for lightness...)
75g All Purpose Flour (...but hedging my bet)
10g Cornstarch (for crispyness)
4g Sugar (for browning)
3g Salt
3g Active Dry Yeast
225g Water
1 Large Egg (50g)

Whisk together dry and wet ingredients separately. Then mix together. Let proof for an hour or two until risen about 50% over original level.

This basic recipe could use a bit more salt, but is okay as is. And as waffles go, these should be pretty healthy. I'm almost ashamed of that. But as my original goal was to drizzle butter over the top, I'm okay with it.

Future flavor enhancement plans:

  • A touch more salt
  • Cold ferment in the refrigerator overnight
  • Vanilla
  • Malt
  • Replace some water with cream


#83 budrichard

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 06:17 AM

I still say you can't make a better waffle than Golden Dipt Belgian Waffle Mix http://www.goldendip.../ssl/gdbwm.html !-Dick

Edited by budrichard, 28 May 2011 - 06:19 AM.


#84 Chris Hennes

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Posted 28 May 2011 - 09:21 AM

How does the Golden Dipt compare to Golden Malted?

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