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Non Lemon / Lime Curds


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#1 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 07:04 AM

I'm in a rut, I only make lemon or key lime curd. Anyone have other recipes of flavors they like and would share?

I saw a ad with a strawberry curd and thought that would be interesting. Any reason why I can't use the same base recipe and just change out the fruit juice, balance the sugar and maybe add a drop of similar flavored emulsion?

#2 Chef/Writer Spencer

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 07:16 AM

I just submitted a recipe for my tangerine curd to Private Clubs magazine. I do a tangerine curd/rhubarb napoleon with creamy tangerine sorbet that rocks out. Just use the same recipe as in lemon curd but add some lemon juice to bring the tart thing out. You won't be sorry.

#3 Steve Klc

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 07:23 AM

One thing to keep in mind sinclair is that not all curd recipes are the same process--some are cooked gently over a water bath and some have enough acidity in the recipe that you can bring the mixture to a boil directly in a saucepan and not worry about over-cooking the eggs. When you play around with fruit substitutions it will likely be the acid percentage which changes--and depending on the fruit or the recipe you might--might--have a problem. But knowing this going in, you can figure out how to adapt.
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#4 jango

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 07:26 AM

At the mention of curd, I have to venture out of lurkdom, barge into the eGullet party, and recommend passionfruit curd. In California, I used Perfect Puree concentrate since it's hard to find the real fruit. Now that I'm back in the land of passion, fruit that is, I'd use the fruit. It's particularly addictive if you add some concentrate after you've strained the cooked curd. Packs a mighty aromatic punch.

Jane

#5 JosephB

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 09:19 AM

I have had the most success making lemon curd by heating the acid, suger and butter first, and then tempering the eggs, before returing the entire mixture to direct heat. With constant stiring, I've never found the need to strain the curd. Is my method generally valid for other fruits?

#6 Elizabeth_11

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 11:38 AM

I've never tried this recipe before, but this raspberry curd recipes looks very similar to a lemon curd and I bet it's quite tasty! It would probably work well with strawberries also if you lowered the sugar amount a bit.

Raspberry Curd
(makes c. 2 c., enough to fill one 9" tart shell)

3 half-pint baskets raspberries
About 1/2 c. sugar
4 T. unsalted butter
1 1/2 t. lemon juice, or to taste
2 eggs
2 egg yolks

Puree the raspberries and put them through a fine strainer to
remove the seeds. Measure 1 1/2 c. puree, heat it in a
non-corroding saucepan, and stir in the sugar and butter.
Taste and add the lemon juice to taste. Whisk the eggs and egg
yolks just enough to mix them, then stir in some of the hot
puree to warm them. Return to the pan and cook over low heat,
stirring constantly, until the mixture is thick--it should
reach a temperature of 170 degrees. Chill.

This can be used as a cake filling, or to fill a tart or
tartlets. Garnish with a little creme Chantilly.
-Elizabeth

Mmmmmmm chocolate.


#7 Michael Laiskonis

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 12:28 PM

I've been doing a free form yuzu curd tart for some time. Yuzu is a citrus fruit of Japanese origin, found often in savory cooking (sashimi dishes and nuevo/fusion ceviche, for instance), and with an exotic, aromatic flavor that I've come to describe as a marriage of apricot and lime. The fresh fruit is difficult to find, and quite expensive. We source a bottled juice that is really nice, unlike most bottled lemon and lime juices I've tasted.

The curd is produced in the classic proportion and conventional manner, the acidity of the yuzu softened with a bit of orange juice. I, however, prefer to emulsify the butter after cooking the base, which will provide a smoother, creamier texture and allow the sweet flavor of the butter to come through.

For the "tart" described below, the curd is fortified with gelatin, then cooled and lightened with whipped cream. This is set into ring molds with a sablée breton base, then sprayed with white chocolate with the addition of subtle pink and orange accents. On the menu, it is plated with a muscat-ginger caramel, kumquat confit, and a tangerine/clementine sorbet with a 'creamy' mouthfeel due to the addition of milk powder...

Yuzu Custard Tart

YIELD: approx. 25 60mm tart rings

4 whole eggs
340g granulated sugar
120g yuzu juice
50g orange juice
zest of two lemons
zest of two oranges
6g sheet gelatin
20g water
170g unsalted butter, softened
160g heavy cream, whipped to soft peaks


1. In a heavy, non reactive saucepan, whisk together eggs and sugar, then add yuzu and orange juices, along with zest.
2. On medium heat, bring mixture to a boil, stirring constantly, as it will easily scorch on the bottom. Bloom gelatin in water.
3. When mixture boils and is quite thick, remove from heat and add gelatin. Allow to cool briefly and emulsify the butter into the yuzu custard in small amounts. Strain through a chinois and gently chill in an ice water bath.
4. Once cooled but not yet set, fold into whipped cream and portion into tart rings, set onto an acetate lined sheet pan. Top each tart with a 55mm disk of sablée breton. Freeze.
5. Invert and unmold tarts and spray with white chocolate, followed by light accents of pink and orange. Return to freezer. Allow to temper under refrigeration for one hour prior to serving.
Michael Laiskonis
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New York
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#8 elyse

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 02:18 PM

Elizabeth and Michael, your curds look wonderful.

Michael, if you couldn't get yuzu juice, what would you (I) substitute?

#9 Xanthippe

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Posted 08 June 2003 - 05:57 PM

In a fortuitous coincidence, I just last week polished off the last of a jar of Kilchurn Estates' luscious banana curd -- only to discover it's no longer available here. Crisis! This was truly one of the most sublime fruit curds I've ever had the pleasure of eating.

That said, any ideas as to how to make it would be welcome. Bananas aren't a juicy fruit, of course, so for starters -- what might I use for liquid?? My curd-making experience is limited to your basic citrus: lemon, lime, grapefruit, and blood orange.

#10 Marlene

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 05:32 AM

Curd Recipes

Rasberry Curd

Yuzu Custard Tart
Marlene
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#11 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 06:33 AM

When I make banana mousse I like to use orange juice mainly as my acid and tiny splash of lemon. The orange doesn't over power the banana the way lemon does and the acid does prevent browning. So to make banana curd why couldn't you make an orange curd and add pureed banana after cooking?

Joseph, you'll like your curd even more if you wait until your curd cools down and then add your butter and emulsify it. Techically, that's proper technique...just like when making ganche... try it-you'll like it.

How about freezing it? Do you? I've read others say they do, but wouldn't you need to add some gelatin so it wouldn't seperate/crack during defrosting?

#12 Xanthippe

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 09:10 AM

When I make banana mousse I like to use orange juice mainly as my acid and tiny splash of lemon. The orange doesn't over power the banana the way lemon does and the acid does prevent browning. So to make banana curd why couldn't you make an orange curd and add pureed banana after cooking?

Your idea makes sense to me, Sinclair; I'm going to give it a try. Thanks.

But I probably ought not use blood oranges for this curd, wouldn't you say?

#13 JessicaSophia

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 09:35 AM

Funny this question came up, as I'm making a rehearsal-dinner cake for my brother that I was hoping to fill with strawberry-lemon curd and garnish with marzipan strawberries (incidentally, it'll be Ruth Levy Beranbaum's Yellow Butter Cake with white buttercream frosting). I was planning to puree and strain some strawberries and just add them to the lemon. Maybe I'll adapt Elizabeth11's Raspberry curd recipe instead.

#14 nightscotsman

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 10:27 AM

Funny this question came up, as I'm making a rehearsal-dinner cake for my brother that I was hoping to fill with strawberry-lemon curd and garnish with marzipan strawberries (incidentally, it'll be Ruth Levy Beranbaum's Yellow Butter Cake with white buttercream frosting). I was planning to puree and strain some strawberries and just add them to the lemon. Maybe I'll adapt Elizabeth11's Raspberry curd recipe instead.

Instead of just adding strawberry puree to the lemon curd (which would make it too soft and liquid for a cake filling), I would suggest making Rose's strawberry conserve from the Cake Bible and adding that instead. Her mothod greatly intensifies the flavor and the finished product is gelled enough to not water down the curd. Just be sure to whisk the conserve or pass it through a strainer to make it very smooth just before adding it so you don't get lumps. Or you might try warming to melt it and adding it to the still warm curd.

I wanted to make a blackberry curd a couple weeks ago and had problems with several recipes not thickening enough. I finally ended up having to add a bit of cornstarch and bringing it to a full boil - sort of like a berry pastry cream. My understanding is that the acid in the lemon juice helps to thicken the curd - it curdles the eggs, thus the name. Most other fruits don't have enough acid to thicken as well as lemons do.

#15 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 01:26 PM

Jessica, Nightcotsman gives you good advice. The ONLY way you could just add fresh strawberry puree is if you simmered it down to thicken it (till very thick), otherwise it would be very runny. Although I haven't made Rose's sb conserve, that really does sound like a better tasting way to go.

If you don't mind, I'd also like to suggest switching your butter cake recipe. I think the best one (to date) I've ever had came from "The Bakers Dozen" cookbook, which you can find online (I promise, you won't be disappointed). Personally, I'm not a big fan of RLB. cakes, I see them as very good technically but everyone I've tried (except a couple) haven't tasted as good as they read. She's a outstanding scientist, but not an outstanding baker. (Sorry, just my opinion)

Xanthippe- I learned about the oj instead of lemon from a Michael Roux's book. I wish I had thought of it myself, but I didn't. I don't know, I can't taste much difference in a blood orange then a reg., it's really just the color.

Hum, good point nightscotsman about thickening. I think I'll try gelatin instead of cornstarch. But I suppose then it's a fruit bavarian and not a curd? Maybe you need to keep lemon or orange for your acid/thickening then just make it a compound by adding another stronger flavor?

#16 Elizabeth_11

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 02:38 PM

Perhaps if she JessicaSophia substituted strawberry puree for raspberry puree and reduced the amount of sugar a tad, then added a bit of gelatin at the end it would result in a firmer curd? Raspberry puree is also rather "liquidy" if you think about it, not to mention lemon curd uses pure liquid. Am I making sense? Wouldn't this work?

Also, I did a search on banana curd and didn't come up with many recipes, but I did find an "ingredients list" for a banana curd product. It listed bananas, sugar, butter, eggs and lemon. Sounds like maybe you could in fact substitute banana for other purees??? Again--just a suggestion! :biggrin:

Edited by Elizabeth_11, 09 June 2003 - 02:40 PM.

-Elizabeth

Mmmmmmm chocolate.


#17 Xanthippe

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Posted 09 June 2003 - 06:32 PM

Xanthippe- I learned about the oj instead of lemon from a Michael Roux's book. I wish I had thought of it myself, but I didn't. I don't know, I can't taste much difference in a blood orange then a reg., it's really just the color.

Well I appreciate the information, Sinclair, original to you or not! :wink:
As to blood oranges, the particular variety I have right now (Moro) really does taste a bit different than the regular type; plus there's the color, as you said. So, as I definitely want the banana curd to be yellow, I will use oranges other than the Moros.

Edit to thank you, too, Elizabeth. Don't know why I didn't think to Google a recipe, but I appreciate the ingredient information. It does indeed sound as if I can use banana puree in place of another fruit puree. I'll give it a go and report back. Thanks again. :smile:

Edited by Xanthippe, 09 June 2003 - 06:36 PM.


#18 Aria B.

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 04:25 PM

I'm wanting to try more curds besides good ol' lemon. I can imagine lime, but what other citrus or other types of fruit curds have you made? Where do you find the recipes, or do you make from experimentation?
Aria in Oregon

#19 gfron1

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 04:29 PM

Here's a previous topic on orange curd. I've also had guava and mango.

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#20 Patrick S

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 04:50 PM

I made a passion fruit curd once, using a frozen sweetened puree. I made little tartlets with little discs of banana cake, topped by strawberry jam, topped with the curd.

Posted Image

Mine turned out a little too sweet, but were still good. I was trying to duplicate something called the tart Maeva I had at Vanille Patisserie in Chicago, which was delicious.

Posted Image

Edited by Patrick S, 09 August 2007 - 04:51 PM.

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#21 JeanneCake

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 05:41 PM

Years ago I found a recipe for raspberry curd online - it had the strained juice, butter, sugar, yolks and the standard procedure. (You can make a firmer curd by using whole eggs and adding the butter at the end, or with just yolks and having everything in at the same time and bringing it to a specific temp - 186 is what I use for citrus).

So by experimenting with the level of sugar you could probably make a curd or rough approximation of one with unsweetened juice of almost anything..... consider the possibilities - berry, pineapple, tangerine, even juiced melons probably.

#22 Pam R

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 06:04 PM

So by experimenting with the level of sugar you could probably make a curd or rough approximation of one with unsweetened juice of almost anything.....  consider the possibilities - berry, pineapple, tangerine, even juiced melons probably.

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I agree - you could probably use any number of juices - but you may need to mix in some lemon juice to get it to set up. I've made orange curd many times, and it will not set up well unless I add some lemon juice. I'm played around with sugar and egg quantities, and nothing worked.

I made a batch of key lime curd a couple of days ago and froze it for use next week. With lime, it's just a matter of replacing the lime juice for lemon juice in your recipe.

#23 lunatuna

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 06:20 PM

A few days ago, I found myself with some leftover rhubarb stalks and berries. Was in the mood for some kind of curd, and there were some decent-looking lemons in the fridge, so: I made the recipe for lemon curd in the newish Joy of Cooking, adding two (chopped) stalks of rhubarb along with scant handfuls of both raspberries and blackberries. (I added the extra fruit at the same time as the lemon juice.) Once it seemed to have curd-i-fied, I took it off the heat and whirred out the chunks with my immersion blender. Some tiny bits of fruit remained, but didn't bother me; if you're a nut for smooth consistency, you might want to push the curd through a strainer. Really delicious stuff--I've been eating it by the spoonful and on toast, but I could also see using it as a tart filling.

#24 maggiethecat

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 06:44 PM

A few days ago, I found myself with some leftover rhubarb stalks and berries.  Was in the mood for some kind of curd, and there were some decent-looking lemons in the fridge, so: I made the recipe for lemon curd in the newish Joy of Cooking, adding two (chopped) stalks of rhubarb along with scant handfuls of both raspberries and blackberries.  (I added the extra fruit at the same time as the lemon juice.)  Once it seemed to have curd-i-fied, I took it off the heat and whirred out the chunks with my immersion blender.  Some tiny bits of fruit remained, but didn't bother me; if you're a nut for smooth consistency, you might want to push the curd through a strainer.  Really delicious stuff--I've been eating it by the spoonful and on toast, but I could also see using it as a tart filling.

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OK, that sounds wonderful. I want some Right Now.

I've made pink grapefruit curd and it went over well.

Margaret McArthur

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#25 etalanian

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Posted 09 August 2007 - 07:30 PM

They're out of season now, but blood oranges make a beautiful and delicious curd.

Eileen
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#26 sazji

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 12:22 AM

Blackberry! They are in season now. I've never tried curd with them but have juiced them by cooking them down and straining - get some red fruit ifyou pick them yourself to get a bit more tartness. I've used it for a junket with the addition of cream and cream cheese - a sort of blackberry pudding, and used it to fill tarts. I also made a blackberry merengue pie, the flavor was really intense. I think it would make a great curd.
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#27 chezcherie

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Posted 11 August 2007 - 07:37 AM

cranberry curd
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#28 dystopiandreamgirl

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 08:35 PM

Chez Panisse Desserts has recipes for apricot, blood orange, gooseberry, loganberry, raspberry, red currant, and wild blackberry.

I've made the blackberry and raspberry, and both were a rather ghastly color, probably due to the juices blending with the bright orange yolks of free range eggs.

Recipes for lemon, lime, orange and passion fruit curds are in The Cake Bible; the orange calls for reducing 1 cup of juice to 2 tablespoons. I found it too sweet (the others are delicious). In The Pie and Pastry Bible there is a version using sour seville oranges - not only an improvement but one of the best things I've ever tasted.

I made a guava curd which tasted fantastic but was the color of...mustard. I hid it inbetween the layers of a coconut milk cake, and despite the color it was well received.
My preference is not to hide them:

lemon:
Posted Image

meyer lemon:
Posted Image

#29 maggiethecat

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 08:47 PM

Chez Panisse Desserts has recipes for apricot, blood orange, gooseberry, loganberry, raspberry, red currant, and wild blackberry.

I've made the blackberry and raspberry, and both were a rather ghastly color, probably due to the juices blending with the bright orange yolks of free range eggs. 

Recipes for lemon, lime, orange and passion fruit curds are in The Cake Bible; the orange calls for reducing 1 cup of juice to 2 tablespoons.  I found it too sweet (the others are delicious).  In The Pie and Pastry Bible there is a version using sour seville oranges - not only an improvement but one of the best things I've ever tasted.

I made a guava curd which tasted fantastic but was the color of...mustard.  I hid it inbetween the layers of a coconut milk cake, and despite the color it was well received. 
My preference is not to hide them:

lemon:
Posted Image

meyer lemon:
Posted Image

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Ok, my socks are officially knocked off -- you might find them on Saturn. Those are beautiful photos.

I'm totally with you about Seville orange curd. The same oranges that give you the best marmelade give you amazing orange curd.

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#30 gfron1

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Posted 13 August 2007 - 09:20 PM

Wow! What else can you say to those beauties!

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