Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

What's Everyone's Favorite Beer?


  • Please log in to reply
222 replies to this topic

#61 paul o' vendange

paul o' vendange
  • participating member
  • 592 posts

Posted 30 June 2003 - 09:05 AM

I could be wrong, but I believe all of Bell's beers are bottle conditioned. I don't think there's a filter in the plant.

I think they are becoming more widespread now that people are getting more used to the idea of living beer as opposed to pasteurized filtered crap.


I agree pasteurization leads to crap beer, but can't go so far as to say that filtration always does.

Many bottle conditioned beers are, to my taste, lousy with autolysis from improper cellaring, and the taste of rotten yeast guts doesn't add up to a great beer. And with a clean Quality Control SOP, a brewery can filter without pasteurization, yielding clean beer without cooking it. Goose Island for one, where I worked.

Remplis ton verre vuide; Vuide ton verre plein. Je ne puis suffrir dans ta main...un verre ni vuide ni plein. ~ Rabelais


#62 elyse

elyse
  • legacy participant
  • 4,861 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 30 June 2003 - 04:14 PM

I will say that Brooklyn does NOT make my favorite weissbier.

#63 malachi

malachi
  • participating member
  • 467 posts
  • Location:Eastern Sierra, California

Posted 30 June 2003 - 05:50 PM

Here's a question:  why don't any of the great microbrewers in the States (e.g., Rogue) make bottle conditioned beers?

One (at this point) needs to subdivide the so-called "microbreweries" in the US into a bunch of different categories. In the "old-school" category, you do (in fact) get few if any bottle-conditioned beers. Then you get the more recent main-steam micros which have some or many bottle conditioned beers (Victory and Stone are good examples). And there are the US micros that brew Belgian style beers (Allagash, New Belgium, Ommegang, etc.) who do entirely bottle conditioned beers due to the style. And finally there are a growing number of true "craft" breweries who pursue the super-high standards and tend to produce very small quantities of beers which are either true to their styles or truly experimental and thus are sometimes filtered, sometimes bottle-conditioned, sometimes cask-conditioned (Alesmith, Dogfish Head, Kalamazoo and Three Floyds are all examples).

Oh... and I believe that Rogue makes or has made a number of either unfiltered or bottle-conditioned ales including their Charlie 1981, Mo Ale, Imperial Stout, Brew 5000, Old Crustacean and their Kriek.

Edited by malachi, 30 June 2003 - 05:50 PM.

fanatic...

#64 Brewery

Brewery
  • participating member
  • 49 posts
  • Location:Northern AZ mountains

Posted 01 July 2003 - 08:50 AM

Recently introduced to "Delirium Tremens". It is tough to think of a better beer on tap.
Runners up: Belhaven Ale, Keo, Leffe, Liberty Ale, ect...

#65 Al_Dente

Al_Dente
  • participating member
  • 1,875 posts
  • Location:Washington DC

Posted 09 July 2003 - 04:26 PM

I'm with you on the dedededelirium tremens. Belgian beers in general are fantastic. I also dig ANY Chimay.

Is it me, or do beers make you think more specifically of an experience having them than with wine-- especially in the country of their origin. I remember drinking monk-made in Belgium, bitters in a London pub, Guinness in a dirt floor pub in god-knows-where Ireland, and local German brews in Bavarian beer halls. Wine, on the other hand, is more internationally ubiquitous perhaps? I mean, I've had many memorable wine drinking experiences (and a few I don't remember so well), but I don't have that strong association with a place?

Is this making any sense? Sorry, I'm on my 3rd Anchor Steam....
peak performance is predicated on proper pan preparation...
-- A.B.

#66 A Scottish Chef

A Scottish Chef
  • legacy participant
  • 275 posts
  • Location:Argyll & Bute, Scotland.

Posted 09 July 2003 - 04:52 PM

Stropramen, Gilde Pils and are favourites.

Al Dente is right, too. I like San Miguel from drinking them in midden pubs in Majorca. And Tuborg lager has enjoyable memories of getting drunk in Knockderry Castle.

But I'm not a snob about this - I'll happily get drunk drinking Tennents.

#67 jsolomon

jsolomon
  • participating member
  • 2,534 posts
  • Location:Medical school

Posted 08 August 2003 - 06:18 AM

Definitely Spilker Ales Hopalleuia
Spilker Ales Nebraska
I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

#68 PDC

PDC
  • participating member
  • 125 posts
  • Location:New York City

Posted 11 August 2003 - 06:47 AM

Favorite beer? Well, like you hear so often with food, I think the approach is to consume locally and in season. "In season" meaning IPA's in the spring and fall (and summer if not too hot), Weissbeers and pilsners in summer, Mai Bocks (or Oktoberfests, basically the same) in late spring and fall, Stouts in fall and winter, and Bocks and barleywines in winter. If you're not sure of what's "in season", consult your local brewpub. If it's of any quality whatsover you should be able to tell what's in season by what they have on tap.

Of course, there can be exceptions to the rule - like it's nice to have a good chocolate stout or barleywine with dessert year-round, or if I happen to be eating Southwestern food in the winter I'll still get an IPA with it, etc.

That said, in a pinch I'll get a Sierra Nevada Pale Ale when I'm in a restaurant in my hometown since that's pretty widely available in NYC. If not, Yuengling or Rolling Rock is just fine.

#69 Rich Pawlak

Rich Pawlak
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,872 posts
  • Location:Lawrenceville, NJ

Posted 12 August 2003 - 08:38 PM

My favorite beers are in a 3-way tie:

Victory Prima Pils
Victory Hop Devil
Sly Fox Perkiomen Pils

Rich Pawlak

 

Reporter, The Trentonian

Feature Writer, INSIDE Magazine
Food Writer At Large

MY BLOG: THE OMNIVORE

"In Cerveza et Pizza Veritas"


#70 Gonzo FreakPower

Gonzo FreakPower
  • legacy participant
  • 3 posts

Posted 14 August 2003 - 02:58 PM

I think there's too many to name them all:
Duvel
Westmalle, best on tap
Leffe (bruin or blond)
Grimbergen (dobbel en tripel)
Brugse Tripel
Straffe Hendrik (Brugge)
Palm, also best on tap
Corsendonk (bruin or blond)
Hoegaarden
Jupiler to stock the fridge (Leinenkugel's Original from WI is a great subsitute for anyone in the Midwest)
Maes Pils with steak and fries

Some American stuff does the job too:
Fat Tire Amber, Summit Alt Bier, Kona Longboard, Gordon Biersch Blonde Bock (tap only).

That's just a small taste of it. I can't remember all the great beers I've had.

#71 elizabethnathan

elizabethnathan
  • legacy participant
  • 34 posts

Posted 15 August 2003 - 12:19 AM

Boont Amber from Anderson Valley California.

Fat Tire has only recently become widely available in the Bay Area. It's nice to see it on tap now.

#72 Sweet Willie

Sweet Willie
  • participating member
  • 866 posts
  • Location:ORD

Posted 15 August 2003 - 05:20 PM

XXXX Bitter from Australia, tops on my list, VERY tough to find in the US, if anyone does please email me, I'm tired of paying $30+ for a case of beer shipped from Oz.

When traveling, any bitter, keep them coming.

Guiness I like, most other heavy stouts I don't. Hoping to go to Ireland soon and try it "fresh".

Hot muggy summer days when I'm drinking many beers, I like mondelo especial, bohemian.
"I did absolutely nothing and it was everything I thought it could be"

#73 tommyf

tommyf
  • legacy participant
  • 20 posts

Posted 19 August 2003 - 06:31 AM

My favorite beer has to be Cobra Beer. Has anyone here in the US tried it? Its a Czech recipe, Anglo-Indian beer. Really good flavors and not too gassy, meaning you don't get bloated. I haven't seen it in the US, but I beleive the company is going to release it over here soon. Do not confuse it with King Cobra which tastes like dead cat!

#74 dhalandrice

dhalandrice
  • legacy participant
  • 9 posts

Posted 19 August 2003 - 08:34 AM

Oh Kenk St Ambroise Oatmeal Stout is wonderful! Too bad I can't get it here. I must put in some love for Moosehead, a good standby Canadian mass-prod. My boyfriend recently introduced me to the beers of Omegang, from Cooperstown, NY - They only produce Belgian style ales. I have tried the Omegang Abbey ale and the Hennepin Farmhouse ale - but have yet to try their Rare Vos. The two were excellent, and I look forward to heading across the border to stock up again.

#75 fresco

fresco
  • participating member
  • 3,330 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 19 August 2003 - 09:50 AM

Oh Kenk  I must put in some love for Moosehead, a good standby Canadian mass-prod.

There must be something to the notion that if it's exotic, it's desirable. Moosehead is popular in places like Florida, but I can't actually recall seeing someone ordering one in Canada. And a Swedish friend says that when he returns to Sweden, he is under orders to bring as much Labatt Blue as he can carry. Blue is kind of Canada's Bud.
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#76 PDC

PDC
  • participating member
  • 125 posts
  • Location:New York City

Posted 19 August 2003 - 10:45 AM

[quote name='fresco' date='Aug 19 2003, 09:50 AM'] [quote name='dhalandrice' date='Aug 19 2003, 11:34 AM']Oh Kenk . Blue is kind of Canada's Bud. [/quote]
Actually, to my knowledge the Bud in Canada IS Blue. Labatt produces all the A-B products under contract, and Molson produces all of Coors' products under contract. It even says so on the containers.

Of course, that's why the Bud in Canada tastes so much better. I can't stand American Bud, but I do like Blue as far as the mass-produced beers go.

#77 fresco

fresco
  • participating member
  • 3,330 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 19 August 2003 - 10:51 AM

Actually, to my knowledge the Bud in Canada IS Blue.  Labatt produces all the A-B products under contract, and Molson produces all of Coors' products under contract.  It even says so on the containers.

Of course, that's why the Bud in Canada tastes so much better.  I can't stand American Bud, but I do like Blue as far as the mass-produced beers go.


You are assuming they just run the Blue tap a little longer and bottle the excess as Bud or whatever, which is entirely possible--although doesn't the Bud recipe contain rice, which is unheard-of in "Canadian" beer?
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#78 NVNVGirl

NVNVGirl
  • participating member
  • 387 posts
  • Location:Napa, CA

Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:02 PM

I like a lot of the microbrewery's beers from the Pacific Northwest...so many of them! But I also love Anchor Steam and Negro Modelo. :smile:

#79 NVNVGirl

NVNVGirl
  • participating member
  • 387 posts
  • Location:Napa, CA

Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:04 PM

I like a lot of the microbrewery's beers from the Pacific Northwest...so many of them! But I also love Anchor Steam and Negro Modelo.  :smile:

Forgive my misspelling...make that NegrA Modelo :blush:

#80 dhalandrice

dhalandrice
  • legacy participant
  • 9 posts

Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:21 PM

To clear up a few things. PDC I did not say that "Blue is kind of Canada's Bud." That was fresco. Secondly, fresco I'm from Southern Ontario, and still live here. I can verify that many people I know do in fact order it. Moosehead is on tap at most bars, and is frequently consumed during basketball season (by the pitcher, of course). In addition I have a special place in my heart for it as it represents many a pub night during my University years.

And as redarmy says, the Sleeman and Creemore products are quite good.

Edited by dhalandrice, 19 August 2003 - 12:27 PM.


#81 redarmy

redarmy
  • legacy participant
  • 22 posts

Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:24 PM

There must be something to the notion that if it's exotic, it's desirable. Moosehead is popular in places like Florida, but I can't actually recall  seeing  someone ordering one in Canada.

My father buys Moosehead in cans because, as he puts it, it comes in a handy eight pack, with a carrying handle. That being said, I can't say that I've ever seen anyone order Moosehead in an actual bar in Alberta.

If you're looking for semi-mass market Canadian beers that aren't a Labbatt or Molson product, I would recommend anything by Big Rock, Sleeman or Creemore Springs. Of note: Big Rock's Grasshopper Wheat Ale, Traditional Ale and McNally's Extra Ale; Sleeman's Sliver Creek Lager and Steam Beer; Creemore Springs Premium Lager and urBock.

My particular favorites are the Creemore Springs Lager (when I can get it), Grasshopper and Guinness (which actually does taste different in Dublin.)

Edited by redarmy, 19 August 2003 - 12:25 PM.


#82 fresco

fresco
  • participating member
  • 3,330 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 19 August 2003 - 12:26 PM

To clear up a few things. PDC I did not say that "Blue is kind of Canada's Bud." That was fresco. Secondly, fresco I'm from Southern Ontario, and still live here. I can verify that many people I know do in fact order it. Moosehead is on tap at most bars, and is frequently consumed during basketball season (by the pitcher, of course). In addition I have a special place in my heart for it as it represents many a pub night during my University years.

You may well be right about Moosehead being available at a lot of places, but as I said before, I can't recall seeing anyone ordering it. We probably go to different bars.
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#83 Fuzz Bucket

Fuzz Bucket
  • legacy participant
  • 1 posts

Posted 20 August 2003 - 08:07 AM

Good brew:

if I could bring one with me-Mendocino Red Tail Ale

something meaty but not too meaty-Wasatch Polygamy Porter (you can't have just one!)

something meaty and only meaty-Murphy's Irish Stout

on a hot summer evening-Sam Adams Cherry Wheat

a fine pils-Staropramen

after hucking off routine 4 footers on the Slickrock Trail with 5" clearance for an entire day- Moab Brewery's Dead Horse Ale

if I'm feelin' snooty but still want a good brew that's as snooty as I'm feeling at that moment-Gordon Biersch Maibock

when I'm listening to Johnny Cash and feel as if I need a big wet kiss-Pyramid DPA

most memorable underappreciated beer I ever had- Half Moon Bay Brewing Co's Mavericks Amber Ale

least memorable overappreciated beer I ever had yet still, in a weird way, liked it, if not for the novelty of it all-Hamm's

best disco-era beer I ever had-Tuborg

best beer shirt I ever owned-Primo Beer

best pub I've ever been to and can almost remember it-Durty Nelly's, Bunratty, Ireland

most beautiful pub I've ever been to and can almost remember it-Ryan's of Parkgate, Dublin, Ireland

my first beer (virgin)-Foster's Lager (big can)

my last beer (last night)-Squatter's St. Provo Girl

today's beer of choice-SLO Brewing Co's Extra Pale Ale

--

Thank you!

Fuzz Bucket Korlenski
Park City, UT

Edited by Fuzz Bucket, 20 August 2003 - 08:09 AM.


#84 malcolmjolley

malcolmjolley
  • participating member
  • 572 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 20 August 2003 - 08:17 AM

To clear up a few things. PDC I did not say that "Blue is kind of Canada's Bud." That was fresco. Secondly, fresco I'm from Southern Ontario, and still live here. I can verify that many people I know do in fact order it. Moosehead is on tap at most bars, and is frequently consumed during basketball season (by the pitcher, of course). In addition I have a special place in my heart for it as it represents many a pub night during my University years.

You may well be right about Moosehead being available at a lot of places, but as I said before, I can't recall seeing anyone ordering it. We probably go to different bars.


Maybe in 1995 people were ordering Moosehead...if anything they're ordering Keith's now.

I like that new Mill Street organic, though I don't like the tiny bottles - good on draft.

Tried a new one (for me) on the weekend: Neustadt. Quite tasty. My new favourite.


Neustadt Springs Brewery Ltd.
456 Jacob St.
Neustadt, Ontario
Phone: (519) 799-5790
Hours: 10am - 6pm Tuesday to Sunday
Brewer: Andrew Stimpson

Won a silver medal at Guelph Beer Festival 2000 for Neustadt Lager.

Reputed to be the oldest original operating brewery building in Ontario. Stone built in 1859 by 40 German stonemasons, with underground caverns where the original crystal springs flow.

From:

http://realbeer.com/...crobrewery.html
Malcolm Jolley
Gremolata.com

#85 PDC

PDC
  • participating member
  • 125 posts
  • Location:New York City

Posted 20 August 2003 - 01:31 PM

To clear up a few things. PDC I did not say that "Blue is kind of Canada's Bud." That was fresco.

Sorry, that wasn't me directly, I just snipped the quote and that's how it came out. No offense intended or anything. :wub:

#86 PDC

PDC
  • participating member
  • 125 posts
  • Location:New York City

Posted 20 August 2003 - 01:41 PM

Actually, to my knowledge the Bud in Canada IS Blue.  Labatt produces all the A-B products under contract, and Molson produces all of Coors' products under contract.  It even says so on the containers.

Of course, that's why the Bud in Canada tastes so much better.  I can't stand American Bud, but I do like Blue as far as the mass-produced beers go.


You are assuming they just run the Blue tap a little longer and bottle the excess as Bud or whatever, which is entirely possible--although doesn't the Bud recipe contain rice, which is unheard-of in "Canadian" beer?

It could be the case. I'm not sure how faithfully they have to follow the cheapness of A-B's procedures. Could be just like that episode of the Simpsons where they have one line going into kegs marked "Duff Beer", "Duff Ice", "Duff Dry"... :biggrin:

Canadian Bud sure tasted awfully similar to Blue the last time I had it though (and the only reason I tried it was that a friend tipped me off onto the contract brewing). Still haven't had the gumption to try Molson's Coors Light though, I can't imagine that being any better than Molson Golden which I think is pretty bad. I'll take Ex any time though, or Canadian, or XXX if I feel like killing a lot of brain cells.

For those who are giving Canadian micro tips, allow me to humbly suggest Unibroue's excellent line of Belgian-style ales. For those who like Ommegang's flagship beer, try a La Fin Du Monde. You'll be happy you did. And the Trois Pistoles is quite excellent as well.

And on the Moosehead front, the Moosehead Pale Ale (red label) is a good mass produced beer if you can get it. I've only ever seen it in New Brunswick and (oddly enough) Ottawa.

#87 pete ganz

pete ganz
  • participating member
  • 401 posts
  • Location:Beautiful Town, New Jersey

Posted 20 August 2003 - 04:15 PM

For those who are giving Canadian micro tips, allow me to humbly suggest Unibroue's excellent line of Belgian-style ales. For those who like Ommegang's flagship beer, try a La Fin Du Monde. You'll be happy you did. And the Trois Pistoles is quite excellent as well.


I'm currently halfway through a 4-pack of La Fin Du Monde. My local Buy-Rite just started carrying it, and I remember a mention on this thread. I've had Ommegang before, but I don't know if it was their flagship beer, so it's hard to compare. This is definitely in the Belgian style though. Very good call. Since Buy-Rite has it, I'll have to check out the Trois Pistoles as well.

#88 redarmy

redarmy
  • legacy participant
  • 22 posts

Posted 20 August 2003 - 06:08 PM

urg. I can't stand Fin du Monde--I don't know if it was the bottle I tried, but jesus it was terrible.

Also to be avoided--virtually anything by Alleycat. It's a brewery out of Edmonton and (imho) everything they produce is best suited for pouring down the sink.

On the opposite side--and throw stones if you must--I have a soft spot in my heart for a little Pilsner every once in a while.

Yes, I mean this Pilsner.

#89 fresco

fresco
  • participating member
  • 3,330 posts
  • Location:Toronto

Posted 20 August 2003 - 07:12 PM

urg.  I can't stand Fin du Monde--I don't know if it was the bottle I tried, but jesus it was terrible.

Also to be avoided--virtually anything by Alleycat.  It's a brewery out of Edmonton and (imho) everything they produce is best suited for pouring down the sink.

On the opposite side--and throw stones if you must--I have a soft spot in my heart for a little Pilsner every once in a while.

Yes, I mean this Pilsner.

Redarmy,
Didn't Lethbridge Pilsner attain something approaching a goofy cult status among a certain sort of diehard Albertan, especially the ones who found symbolism in the label after smoking a lot of weed?
Arthur Johnson, aka "fresco"

#90 redarmy

redarmy
  • legacy participant
  • 22 posts

Posted 21 August 2003 - 07:54 AM

Redarmy,
Didn't Lethbridge Pilsner attain something approaching a goofy  cult status among a certain sort of diehard Albertan, especially the ones who found symbolism in the label after smoking a lot of weed?

Not sure about the goofy cult status--it certainly isn't a hipster beer to the extent of Pabst Blue Ribbon. It's more of a working class beer than Canadian, especially in rural Alberta and Saskatchewan. (Although Saskatchewan has the home-grown Western Beer, which is nigh undrinkable.)

I do have friends who look for symbolism on the label ("Hey, there's 37 white rabbits and Janis Joplin died at the age of 37 etc. etc.") but usually only when they're approaching the end of the case, rather than the end of the eighth.

And, honestly, finding quote unquote symbolism in your beer label is pretty common. Am I the only one that remembers the "Batman mask on the Molson Red Dog label (if you hold the label upside down and squint just right)" gavote?