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56 replies to this topic

#31 torakris

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Posted 16 January 2005 - 12:46 AM

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mentaiko (spicy cod roe) with nagaimo (mountain yam) seasoned only with a bit of mirin.
I made it a couple hours before taking the picture so it turned out quite watery...

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#32 torakris

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Posted 02 February 2005 - 08:56 PM

lunch yesterday

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tarako-cheese baguette

the bread is spread with a tarako sauce (it was quite spicy- more like mentaiko) and topped with gouda cheese, you are supposed to heat it up in the toaster oven.

after toasting
Posted Image

I wasn't very impressed....

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#33 TurtleMeng

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 11:23 AM

lunch yesterday

tarako-cheese baguette

I wasn't very impressed....

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We had this in Japan from a bakery. I was totally curious, and the conclusion was similar to yours...my son gave a long "eeeeeewww".
"Mom, why can't you cook like the iron chef?"

#34 Ms. Meliss

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 09:30 PM

As a kid, I loved eating Ikura (salmon roe) particularly on hot rice. I remember my grandparents preparing it with miso and possibly some other things that I'm not aware of. I believe the process involved marinating the Ikura in the miso/miso mixture for a relatively long period of time, possibly a few days to a week or so? It was one of those instances where I'd ask if I could eat it everyday (driving my grandmother nuts I'm sure) and it seemed like forever from the time the Ikura arrived at the house to when I could actually slurp it up over hot rice. Anyway, after it was marinated it was strained and rinsed using a cheese cloth and then we'd eat it.

Pretty simple but I never learned how to do it and I'm wondering if anyone knows what I'm talking about and could help me out with 1)what it's called and 2)how to make it!

#35 Hiroyuki

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 09:58 PM

Marinated in miso? I'm not familiar with that version. If you are interested in marinating in soy sauce, I think I can provide some info.
Take a look at this:
http://waka22.web.in...o.jp/ikura.html
(Japanese only)

#36 helenjp

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 01:12 AM

Strained and rinsed *after* marinating. Hmmm. Sounds like your grandmother might have marinated the whole roe rather than separating the eggs out first???

Generally "sujiko" are the not quite ripe eggs which are normally pickled and eaten still in the roe sac. They are lots cheaper than ripe ikura.

Ikura are the fully ripened roe. The link that Hiroyuki gave shows the different steps beautifully, and here is a rough summary. This is also the way that I prepare ikura roe (much cheaper than buying roe ready pickled in soy sauce).

For one double-lobed roe of either ikura or sujiko (a couple of pounds, from memory)...

Dump into a bowl of hand-hot water (hotter than you might expect). This toughens up the membranes and makes it easier to remove the individual eggs. The eggs will get whitish, but don't worry. Remove all the membrane, a fidgety process, and repeat the washing if necessary. Drain and allow to cool. The eggs should turn clear again. Now pack into a plastic container and pour over roughly 200ml each of sake and soy sauce (that's about 5/6 of a US cup). Add about 2 tab of dashi stock if you like. I do like - I think it makes for a much mellower flavor. The roe will immediately turn transparent and develop a glowing color, but hands off!!! Leave in your fridge for at least 24 hours, maybe 2-3 days - the eggs will absorb the marinade and swell. If you want, you can also freeze the marinaded eggs - they will turn cloudy in the freezer, but will be fine when thawed.

#37 helenjp

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 01:16 AM

Sujiko miso-zuke in Japanese.

I thought this sounded more like sujiko than ikura, and sure enough, there it was!

For one roe of sujiko, 150g (5-6oz) of medium-colored miso, blended with 1.5 tab of mirin (sweet sake) and 1/2 tab of sake. Wrap the whole roe in clean dry gauze, and lay on a bed of half the amount of miso. Spread the rest of the miso on top, and either wrap in plastic wrap or pop into a container and leave it in the fridge for 2 days or so.

I'll look forward to trying this in the winter - my Hokkaido-born husband can never get enough sujiko!

#38 torakris

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 01:21 AM

I'll look forward to trying this in the winter - my Hokkaido-born husband can never get enough sujiko!

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My Tokyo born husband can't get enough of sujiko either. :raz:
I have never seen this miso version, it looks great. I will give this a try as well.

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#39 Ms. Meliss

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Posted 28 April 2005 - 07:51 PM

Sujiko miso-zuke in Japanese.

I thought this sounded more like sujiko than ikura, and sure enough, there it was!

For one roe of sujiko, 150g (5-6oz) of medium-colored miso, blended with 1.5 tab of mirin (sweet sake) and 1/2 tab of sake. Wrap the whole roe in clean dry gauze, and lay on a bed of half the amount of miso. Spread the rest of the miso on top, and either wrap in plastic wrap or pop into a container and leave it in the fridge for 2 days or so.

I'll look forward to trying this in the winter - my Hokkaido-born husband can never get enough sujiko!

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I think you are correct. Sujiko, now I know what it's called. This has to be it and now that I think about it, I do believe sake was involved! Thank you. I can't wait to try this!

#40 torakris

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 03:23 PM

For anyone in Japan interested in making your own seasoned ikura or sujiko, now is the time! The stores are now filled with trays of the raw salmon egg sacs. I am thinking of doing some shouyu-zuke (soy sauce seasoned) ikura this week so I can satisfy my craving for ikura-don!! :biggrin:

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#41 trillium

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 03:38 PM

We can buy the salmon roe from the Native dudes who are selling salmon at the farmer's market here in Portland. We made some ikura with sake and soya using the method helenjp gives above. I was wondering if you are supposed to drain them from the marinade after a certain time? Or do you freeze/fridge them with the extra liquid? I was expecting ours to stay orange, but they look kinda dark brown (from the soya) with half of the globe still having an orange translucency. Is this right? The only time I've had them is in a sushi restaurant in the US, and these look nothing like it. They're very tasty though!

regards,
trillium

#42 torakris

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 04:09 PM

We can buy the salmon roe from the Native dudes who are selling salmon at the farmer's market here in Portland.  We made some ikura with sake and soya using the method helenjp gives above.  I was wondering if you are supposed to drain them from the marinade after a certain time?  Or do you freeze/fridge them with the extra liquid?  I was expecting ours to stay orange, but they look kinda dark brown (from the soya) with half of the globe still having an orange translucency.  Is this right?  The only time I've had them is in a sushi restaurant in the US, and these look nothing like it.  They're very tasty though!

regards,
trillium

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How long did you keep them in the sauce?

Also remember that there are two main kinds of ikura, shiozuke (made with just salt) and shoyu-zuke (made with a sauce like you made). The shoyu-zuke ones I buy tend to have a darker hue than the almost neon like shiozuke.

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#43 torakris

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 04:13 PM

I finally picked up some sujiko and made ikura for the first time ever! :biggrin:

I poured hot water over them to remove them from the skins and then rinsed them a couple of tiems to remove all the stubborn parts.
I marinated them with soy, mirin and sake in a 3:1:1 ratio.
I tasted them this morning and the mirin adds jsut a touch of sweetness, I really like these! The webiste I pulled the recipe from said they are best eaten 3 to 5 days after making them so ikura-don is on the menu for Monday. :biggrin:

the nama sujiko
Posted Image

the ikura marinating
Posted Image

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#44 AmyDaniel

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 09:55 PM

Kristin, how careful do you have to be to not break the eggs while washing them? Can you be a little rough with them?

#45 torakris

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 02:27 PM

I thought you would have to be really gentle, but that can actually stand up to quite a bit of abuse. :biggrin:

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#46 torakris

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 05:19 PM

Ikura-don!

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The recipe I looked at said it was best eaten 3 to 5 days after making, this was day 4. I tasted a spoonful every day and honestly thought it was best on day 1, after just sitting overnight.
It was wonderful though, I topped it with some shiso that is growing wild in the backyard. :biggrin:

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#47 peter_nyc

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 01:38 PM

I plan on marinating my own ikura here in New York and am clueless on how to go about doing it. Would anyone be kind enough to provide a rough outline on how to proceed? Thanks so much!

#48 torakris

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 02:58 PM

Here is how I did it:

Take a sac of fresh sujiko (get the freshest one you can darker colors and red lines in the sac indicate age) and place it into a bowl. Pour enough boiling water over it to cover and then gently prod it a bit with chopsticks to loosen the eggs. When most have loosened swirl the chopsticks in the water going continually in the same direction, the outer sac with become entwined on the chopsticks and you can pull it out.
Place into a colander and rinse gently, pulling off with your fingers any bits of sac that may still be stuck.
Place it into tupperware (or similar product) and add the seasonings, I used:
3 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon sake
1 tablespoon mirin (hon-mirin)

I wouldn't keep it for much longer for 5 days and you can freeze it, but it does lose a bit of the freshness. I tasted mine everyday and I prefered the taste at day 1 and day 2.

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#49 peter_nyc

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 03:32 PM

Thanks so much!

Should it be served atop vinegared rice or plain rice?

#50 torakris

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 03:39 PM

Thanks so much!

Should it be served atop vinegared rice or plain rice?

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For a donburi you use just plain rice.
It also goes well as part of a chirashizushi in which case it would be seasoned rice.

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#51 torakris

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 03:22 PM

pizza (from Domino's Japan)

ikura, smoked salmon, cream cheese and fresh basil

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surprisingly good! :biggrin:

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#52 peter_nyc

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 12:36 AM

An itamae at a local sushi restaurant here in New York offered me a sample of homemade ikura because he knew I was looking for sujiko to make my own (I still haven't found any :sad:) What struck me was how much less salty it was compared to the stuff I'm used to (that comes from the fish monger the restaurant gets most of its fish from). Also, the eggs were much firmer and all still whole. Not chewy or viscous at all. I immediately tasted sake and verifed that indeed the chef had added sake to his marinade. I couldn't detect soy sauce and probably would have preferred a bit more.

Is it normal for good, fresh ikura to have a mild taste like this?

#53 torakris

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Posted 06 November 2005 - 12:50 AM

mine did! :biggrin:

Making it yourself really lets you play around with the flavor, mine wasn't salty at all. I like more of a sweeter soy taste which is why I added the mirin with quite a bit of soy sauce.

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#54 peter_nyc

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 10:52 PM

Ok I know I've been really obsessive about the ikura thing lately, but today at my local sushi joint I was served something they called "nama ikura syuyuzuke" (or something close to that). The eggs were VERY MUCH tougher than I've ever had and seemed to be, well, al dente. Needless to say I found the experience a bit offputting; I absolutely love the standard run-of-the-mill packaged ikura that is much saltier and less firm. So was this a mistake in preparation or some other type of preparation I've never had? The "nama" makes me think that it's the latter since I'm under the impression that nama means unpasteurized. :wacko:

#55 torakris

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 12:27 AM

Ok I know I've been really obsessive about the ikura thing lately, but today at my local sushi joint I was served something they called "nama ikura syuyuzuke" (or something close to that).  The eggs were VERY MUCH tougher than I've ever had and seemed to be, well, al dente.  Needless to say I found the experience a bit offputting; I absolutely love the standard run-of-the-mill packaged ikura that is much saltier and less firm.  So was this a mistake in preparation or some other type of preparation I've never had?  The "nama" makes me think that it's the latter since I'm under the impression that nama means unpasteurized.  :wacko:

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It sounds like nama ikura shoyu-zuke. Shoyu is soy sauce and nama can have a couple meanings such as raw, fresh and even unripe.

I don't think I have ever eaten ikura that I would describe as tough or even al dente.

Could it have been sujiko?

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#56 peter_nyc

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 03:03 PM

Could it have been sujiko?

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Actually, yes. The chef did mention it was sujiko, but I thought that just meant that he had prepared the ikura himself. Isn't all ikura made from sujiko? I think I'm a bit fuzzy on the relationship between sujiko and ikura.

#57 torakris

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 03:32 PM

I discussed ikura and sujiko on the Daily Nihongo thread a little while ago:

8/31:

筋子 sujiko

いくら ikura

These are both salmon roe. Sujiko are the eggs that are salted intact in the sac, while the ikura are removed from the sac, separated and then salted. The word ikura is from the Russian word for fish eggs, though in Russia apparently it is used to refer to all fish eggs. In Japan it is only used to refer to the eggs from salmon and trout.

While most people ar quite familiar with ikura, sujiko can be quite hard to find outside of Japan. It is also one of those foods that you tend to eat at home, I have rarely seen sujiko on a menu. Sujiko is quite different than ikura in that is is sold whole in the sac and is quite firm and somewhat sticky (for lack of a better word..), it often is cut into bite sized pieces with a knife before eating.



Though it is more common to purchase these already seasoned, sometimes you can find , 生筋子 nama sujiko (raw sujiko) and then you can make ikura at home.

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