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Japanese foods--Wagashi


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#91 Hiroyuki

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Posted 06 June 2005 - 02:58 PM

What does "Samejima" mean?

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Probably 鮫島 (lit. shark island). The name of the wagashi shop maybe?

#92 torakris

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Posted 13 June 2005 - 12:13 AM

some snacks we picked up on an outing yesterday

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kinako mochi in the back, warabi mochi with matcha-kinako on the right and zunda mochi (with sweetened paste made from edamame) in the front

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#93 torakris

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 12:59 AM

this looks good doesn't it?

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it wasn't... :angry:
It was called sakuranbo milk mochi (sakuranbo are Japanese cherries)
I thought the white stuff was coconut when I grabbed the last one of these from the shelf, after eating it I am still unsure as to what it was. It was NOT coconut though. I don't even think that cherry was a real sakuranbo, as for the milk anko that was inside.... :hmmm: I had never head of anko made with milk, from reading the ingredients I am assuming it was made with milk and kanten (agar agar) and it was dry and crumbly as well as tasteless.

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#94 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 09:17 PM

some snacks we picked up on an outing yesterday

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kinako mochi in the back, warabi mochi with matcha-kinako on the right and zunda mochi (with sweetened paste made from edamame) in the front

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Is the matcha kinako just made with matcha + kinako? I thought before that the green "kinako" was some special kind of kinako made with green beans (I think someone told me that..... :hmmm: )

#95 torakris

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Posted 15 June 2005 - 11:50 PM

Is the matcha kinako just made with matcha + kinako?  I thought before that the green "kinako" was some special kind of kinako made with green beans (I think someone told me that..... :hmmm: )

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It is actually matcha and kinako mixed, though it had just a faint hint of the matcha. There was only one left with a couple regular kinako ones, and the sign said just kinako mochi so I asked the woman what it was. I had never seen that before.

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#96 purpleplasticdoll

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:28 PM

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I just got back from a vacation in Japan and I bought this thinking it was some sort of a cake. But it isn't, it is hard and crispy, sort of like a biscuit. Does anyone know what this is?

What is kinako? I saw something similar but I have always thought it was just something sticky with grated peanuts.

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Are these called Taiyaki? I bought this in Asakusa Kannon Temple

TIA, I'm telling my friends about the food I ate in Japan and I didn't want to give the wrong information.

(My first post and I'm asking 3478734 questions! :blush: )

Edited by purpleplasticdoll, 22 June 2005 - 08:34 PM.


#97 JasonTrue

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 08:50 PM

I just got back from a vacation in Japan and I bought this thinking it was some sort of a cake. But it isn't, it is hard and crispy, sort of like a biscuit. Does anyone know what this is?


I was inclined to think it was castera (kasutera) until you said it was hard and crispy. Castera is fairly soft, in spite of dense air pockets. So I'd be at a loss to give the cake a name if it is hard.

What is kinako? I saw something similar but I have always thought it was just something sticky with grated peanuts.


Kinako is not sticky. It's ground, toasted soybeans. When used in confections, it may have added sugar and salt to bring out the nutty flavor. It is often used on stickier confections, though.

Your little birds are probably the same type of confection as tai-yaki, but that type of molded "waffle" is usually called (animal, vegetable or character name)-yaki based on the appearance.

Edited by JasonTrue, 22 June 2005 - 08:53 PM.

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#98 torakris

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 09:34 PM

first of all welcome to eGullet!

I have no idea what that first thing is, I also thought is was castera until you said it was hard and crispy... Do you have a picture of the package?

Tai-yaki are the ones that are shaped like tai (sea bream, a kind of fish), though they are all pretty much the same. Some times they are just called ningyo-yaki in general, but those tend to be the ones that have faces. I have seen ones like yours though labeled as nigyo-yaki.

here is a little information abou ningyo-yaki

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#99 Hiroyuki

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 09:57 PM

Do you have a picture of the package?

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Yep, just one picture of the package will solve your (our?) problem.

#100 purpleplasticdoll

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:15 PM

I'm sorry I don't have a picture of the packaging. I bought it thinking it was kasutera! I bought this in a Japanese snack shop, they sell dorayaki and etc etc.

JasonTrue, so the brown snack in Torakis's picture is actually mochi with kinako. I thought kinako was the gooey thing. :blush:

Torakis, thanks for the link and warm welcome! I really like the Japan forum, I never knew Tokyo Bay/Odaiba existed till I visited this forum. When I go to Tokyo, it was always the same old places like Harajuku, Ueno, Akihabara.. I'm learning nihongo from your thread! :biggrin:

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Is this kasutera? My mother knows a little Japanese and she tells me they call this Honey Cake.

#101 sanrensho

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Posted 22 June 2005 - 11:20 PM

Is this kasutera? My mother knows a little Japanese and she tells me they call this Honey Cake.


Yes, it's kasutera or "Castella Cake" as it's usually rendered in English. Mmm, I'm getting hungry already.
Baker of "impaired" cakes...

#102 torakris

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Posted 23 June 2005 - 03:06 PM

yes that picture looks like castera to me too.

I am glad you are enjoying our forum! :biggrin:

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#103 torakris

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Posted 26 June 2005 - 11:23 PM

dorayaki!

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left: ume, with ume flavored shiro an (white anko paste) and a sweetened green ume

right: regular anko with a candied chestnut

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#104 sanrensho

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 01:44 AM

dorayaki!


I have to say, I almost cringed when I saw your dorayaki denuded like that. I think a simple cross-section photo would have sufficed.:raz:
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#105 torakris

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Posted 27 June 2005 - 01:56 AM

dorayaki!


I have to say, I almost cringed when I saw your dorayaki denuded like that. I think a simple cross-section photo would have sufficed.:raz:

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I have to admit I sort of cringed when I saw the picture as well.... :hmmm:
it gives them sort of a fast food look...
it didn't really feel that way when I was taking the picture though..

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#106 SuzySushi

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 12:51 AM

I'm resurrecting this thread because I just discovered a wonderful source for fresh wagashi in Honolulu: a shop called Kansai Yamoto, located on Kapiolani Blvd. a block away from Ala Moana Center, with a small stall in the shopping center itself. We found their fresh daifuku in our local supermarket, and I must say it's some of the best wagashi I've ever tasted. We're now eager to work our way through their menu! I bought the traditional daifuku, but they also make new-wave versions like ichigo (with fresh strawberries), chocolate, green tea, and kona coffee.
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#107 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 02:03 AM

I'm resurrecting this thread because I just discovered a wonderful source for fresh wagashi in Honolulu: a shop called Kansai Yamoto, located on Kapiolani Blvd. a block away from Ala Moana Center, with a small stall in the shopping center itself. We found their fresh daifuku in our local supermarket, and I must say it's some of the best wagashi I've ever tasted. We're now eager to work our way through their menu! I bought the traditional daifuku, but they also make new-wave versions like ichigo (with fresh strawberries), chocolate, green tea, and kona coffee.

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Ohhh....I didnt know that Kansai Yamato had a shop...I only know about thier Ala Moana stall. Does the shop have more things than the stand??

#108 SuzySushi

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 02:32 AM

Ohhh....I didnt know that Kansai Yamato had a shop...I only know about thier Ala Moana stall.  Does the shop have more things than the stand??

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I haven't been to the shop yet... I only know the abbreviated offerings in our supermarket and the Ala Moana stall. But their shop menu is online at their website. It looks like they have more varieties. My husband is going there on a reconnaisance mission when he's in town Tuesday! :biggrin:
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#109 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 02:48 AM

Bashoudo is at Shirokiya Honolulu again. This time, not only did they have warabi-mochi, but also an assortment of kanten products.
I tried the tokoroten, which is a block of seaweed-gel sliced into noodle-like strands, and this one was served with a vinegar sauce that had a kind-of ume flavor (it wasnt sweet). Very interesting texture, it was fun to slurp up these interesting "noodles". I wonder... is tokoroten usually served with the vinegar sauce or other types of sauces? Id be interested in trying it with a sweet sauce like kuromitsu or a matcha sauce.

Ive been curious about trying this since I saw it on Next Stop Discovery (Burari) television show. A block of gel was shoved through a sieve-like block, so it was sliced into fat noodles.

So what is the difference between the name of the kanten-noodles I had and the tokoroten described below?
A search in my Online Japanese Translator revealed two Kanji for tokoroten, both meaning gelidium jelly.
心天
心太

This website shows a picture of tokoroten and mentions it is made out of tengusa.
http://www.sumitomo....d/food93_1.html

Kanten and agar-agar are made from different types of seaweeds.
Kanten:  Tengusa and ogonori
Agar-agar:  Suginori and minomata

Source (Japanese only):
http://www.kantenpp....p?faq_catcode=6
See under Q09.

Kanten is made by purifying tokoroten by exposing it to the cold.
Me ga ten library (Japanese only):
http://www.ntv.co.jp...03/02/0202.html

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Obachan makes tokoroten from scratch:
http://kokonuggetyum...ar-noodles.html

#110 helenjp

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Posted 10 October 2005 - 03:57 AM

Hard cake...are you sure this isn't the Japanese version of "rusks" - a cake which is then sliced or split open and then baked again at a low temperature.

There was a bit of a rusk boom years back, and probably some people still make them.

#111 prasantrin

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 04:50 PM

It's shugaku ryoko season at my school. Yesterday was the final day, with the J1 (7th grade) and S3 (12th grade) going to Kyoto (on separate trips). I had to tag along with the S3 girls, but lucky me, we made wagashi! Each could choose which type to make--nama yatsuhashi, yakiyatsuhashi, ichigo daifuku, and the tea ceremony red bean type--I can't remember what they called it--narikiri or something like htat. I made the latter, and it was so easy! Of course, to make really beautiful ones, one needs patience and a fine hand, neither of which I possess, but I think I did a pretty good job.

Pictures will be posted later, but probably not to e-Gullet, as I find Image Gullet to be a pain in the butt.

#112 SuzySushi

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 05:38 PM

It's shugaku ryoko season at my school.  Yesterday was the final day, with the J1 (7th grade) and S3 (12th grade) going to Kyoto (on separate trips).  I had to tag along with the S3 girls, but lucky me, we made wagashi!  Each could choose which type to make--nama yatsuhashi, yakiyatsuhashi, ichigo daifuku, and the tea ceremony red bean type--I can't remember what they called it--narikiri or something like htat.  I made the latter, and it was so easy!  Of course, to make really beautiful ones, one needs patience and a fine hand, neither of which I possess, but I think I did a pretty good job.

Pictures will be posted later, but probably not to e-Gullet, as I find Image Gullet to be a pain in the butt.

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Ohhh.... ohhhh.... I :wub: yatsuhashi!!! Could also post the recipes??? Pretty please???
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#113 JumblyJu

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 09:18 PM

I'm resurrecting this thread because I just discovered a wonderful source for fresh wagashi in Honolulu: a shop called Kansai Yamoto, located on Kapiolani Blvd. a block away from Ala Moana Center, with a small stall in the shopping center itself. We found their fresh daifuku in our local supermarket, and I must say it's some of the best wagashi I've ever tasted. We're now eager to work our way through their menu! I bought the traditional daifuku, but they also make new-wave versions like ichigo (with fresh strawberries), chocolate, green tea, and kona coffee.

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I wish I knew they sold mochi at their Kapiolani location. I'm only familiar with their back door as that's where the parking is.

And it looks like November 1 they're moving to 99 Ranch.

#114 SuzySushi

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 02:08 AM

I wish I knew they sold mochi at their Kapiolani location.  I'm only familiar with their back door as that's where the parking is. 

And it looks like November 1 they're moving to 99 Ranch.

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Relocating to, or opening a third location? (My husband didn't make it to town on Tuesday.)
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#115 JumblyJu

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 03:58 AM

I wish I knew they sold mochi at their Kapiolani location.  I'm only familiar with their back door as that's where the parking is. 

And it looks like November 1 they're moving to 99 Ranch.

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Relocating to, or opening a third location? (My husband didn't make it to town on Tuesday.)

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Relocating. That whole area is scheduled to be demolished. Taiyo and So Gong Dong have already found other locations.

#116 helenjp

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Posted 15 October 2005 - 04:03 AM

Prasantrin, sounds like "nerikiri".

I was surprised to find that nerikiri are much less popular here in eastern Japan than in Osaka/Kyoto.

It's not hard (just somewhat time-consuming) to make the white-bean an that is used as the basis for many nerikiri.

My DH thinks it is a scandalous extravagance, but I sometimes take my boys to the local wagashi shop to choose one each, and to explain the different types - they don't taste anything like the supermarket versions, and I think they're an all too precarious part of Japanese food culture!

#117 Hiroyuki

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Posted 03 November 2005 - 11:22 PM

On Nov. 3, my family went to Shiozawa Sangyo Matsuri (Industrial Fair), which is held every year on this day (Bunka no Hi or Culture Day) on the premises of Imaizumi Museum (Japanese only).

My son and daughter participated in the wagashi making workshop, offered free of charge.

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Wagashi made my my son (shown at the bottom)
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My daughter's turn:
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#118 helenjp

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 06:33 PM

Would you believe I was so obsessed with wagashi that I actually carved a mold like those in Hiroyuki's photos :laugh: .

What a wonderful experience for kids though. (Now I'm thinking to myself that perhaps I could make some koshi an, and a pumpkin and white bean an and get my kids involved.... I think we could make a reasonable pumpkin shape with saran wrap and a piece of string :cool:

#119 JasonTrue

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Posted 10 November 2005 - 01:47 AM

I don't make a lot of wagashi but I've made two attempts at kurikinton recently. This one turned out better-textured than the last one, but there's a lot of room for interpretation on the best texture for kurikinton. I like both the dry and moist types. This one is very moist.

I posted approximate details on how to make homemade Kuri-kinton on my blog.

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#120 JasonTrue

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Posted 12 November 2005 - 01:56 AM

Thanks to Torakris for putting this back in the right topic. Remind me not to post while sleeping. :biggrin:
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