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Tempering Chocolate

Chocolate

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#301 Darienne

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 08:04 AM

As for the accuracy of IR thermometers...  Confectionery partner Barbara and I were making toffee last week and using my IR thermometer.  Strangely the batch was beginning to burn but didn't register the required temperature on my thermometer.  Barbara brought out her thermometer and it registered much hotter than mine...which would explain the slight burning smell.  (The toffee was scrumptious anyway.)

 

Then Barbara noticed that my battery was signaling 'low'.  Aha!  So that was the reason.  New battery in.  Thermometer back in the running...


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#302 Jim D.

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 08:23 AM

As for the accuracy of IR thermometers...  Confectionery partner Barbara and I were making toffee last week and using my IR thermometer.  Strangely the batch was beginning to burn but didn't register the required temperature on my thermometer.  Barbara brought out her thermometer and it registered much hotter than mine...which would explain the slight burning smell.  (The toffee was scrumptious anyway.)

 

Then Barbara noticed that my battery was signaling 'low'.  Aha!  So that was the reason.  New battery in.  Thermometer back in the running...

Have you found that IR thermometers are reasonably accurate (with fresh batteries)?  I have been wondering.  Yesterday I tested, and both IR and non-IR gave approximately the same reading.  Other times they have been too far apart for comfort.  I am new to using IR and am still not confident enough in the accuracy.  But they certainly are convenient, especially when testing two different mixtures at the same time and when one of them is tempered chocolate (it's difficult to remember that I mustn't dip a regular thermometer into some liquid and then into tempered chocolate).



#303 Darienne

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 08:45 AM

 

As for the accuracy of IR thermometers...  Confectionery partner Barbara and I were making toffee last week and using my IR thermometer.  Strangely the batch was beginning to burn but didn't register the required temperature on my thermometer.  Barbara brought out her thermometer and it registered much hotter than mine...which would explain the slight burning smell.  (The toffee was scrumptious anyway.)

 

Then Barbara noticed that my battery was signaling 'low'.  Aha!  So that was the reason.  New battery in.  Thermometer back in the running...

Have you found that IR thermometers are reasonably accurate (with fresh batteries)?  I have been wondering.  Yesterday I tested, and both IR and non-IR gave approximately the same reading.  Other times they have been too far apart for comfort.  I am new to using IR and am still not confident enough in the accuracy.  But they certainly are convenient, especially when testing two different mixtures at the same time and when one of them is tempered chocolate (it's difficult to remember that I mustn't dip a regular thermometer into some liquid and then into tempered chocolate).

 

First low battery/low inaccurate reading for me, so I can't really comment.


Edited by Darienne, 20 December 2013 - 08:46 AM.

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#304 Kerry Beal

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Posted 20 December 2013 - 04:27 PM

I don't trust the IR on boiling stuff - just on chocolate - even then I know some of mine read a little off - so I tend to read the chocolate more than anything.  It starts to look tempered - one of those things that only experience can give - and I still get fooled when I'm using a new chocolate which doesn't react as I expect it to.



#305 chopperreed

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Posted 12 March 2014 - 11:40 PM

Hi everyone i was wondering if anyone has experience with making perfectly tempered couverture chocolate to get that brilliant shine to make truffles etc? any help appreciated!



#306 minas6907

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 12:45 AM

Tempering chocolate just takes time and practice, but once you get it down, your golden. What exactly are you having trouble with? Have you tempered chocolate before? What kind of chocolate are you using? Is it safe to assume that since you want that sheen on your bonbons, your molding the chocolates rather then hand dipping them? What references have you consulted for tempering?

I honestly dont mean to just throw all those questions out there. It can be overwhelming if your new to working with the stuff, but the more info you provide the easier it is for everyone to pitch in for a solution.

#307 Chelseabun

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 02:49 AM

Chopperreed: Have you made any attempts at tempering yet? 



#308 Lisa Shock

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Posted 13 March 2014 - 04:36 AM

We've got a variety of topics about chocolate tempering and finishes.



#309 chopperreed

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 03:10 AM

ive tried tempering lindt dark couverture, going off by books by heating up the chocolate to a certain temp (cant remember to be exact), cooling it down, heating again, cooling it down, i was making bourbon chocolate truffles and dipping the balls in the chocolate and letting it set cold in the fridge, the final shine is ok but i think im still not getting it right since ive seen people doing it and the shine when its set is immaculate, i know a plastic mould would get a shiny surface under some circumstances but that hand rolled truffle is difficult to get perfect.



#310 curls

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 09:33 AM

Do you have pictures of the truffles you made? Was your chocolate in temper...  Was it a uniform color when it dried? Did it have a nice snap to it when you bit into a truffle? You will not get the same level of shine from a dipped piece as you will get with a molded piece.  Also, you should not have to put your dipped truffles into the fridge to have them set up. Just wondering if your chocolate was tempered and not as shiny as you expected or if it was out of temper.  Also, have a look at the link Lisa Shock included, they will provide a lot more information.



#311 emmalish

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Posted 14 March 2014 - 10:52 AM

As someone who doesn't temper chocolate often, I'm just going to chime in to say that the more you do it, the easier it will get. I started off the same as you – learning from a book, raising-lowering-raising the temperature. But the more you do it, the more you'll get a feel for how the chocolate should behave at certain temperatures and how it will feel when it's in temper. Now I don't even need to bother with a thermometer if I'm just doing a small amount.

 

Read the info at the links suggested above, and keep practicing!


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#312 chopperreed

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Posted 15 March 2014 - 02:42 AM

thanks for all the replies guys! will keep trying and perfect it!



#313 keychris

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 07:19 PM

letting it set cold in the fridge, the final shine is ok but i think im still not getting it right since ive seen people doing it and the shine when its set is immaculate

 

Unless you have a warm room, if you have to set your chocolate in the fridge, it's not tempered correctly. (If you do have a warm room, don't try to temper chocolate  :rolleyes:   ) The problem with the methods on the internet that say 'heat to 45 / cool to 27 / heat to 32' © are that they never mention that to get the correct crystals to form, you need to give the chocolate plenty of movement - ie, stirring! LOTS of stirring! When you think you've got the chocolate right, take a test - dip a spatula into the chocolate, clean off one side and leave it on the bench. Dark chocolate should set in under 5 minutes at room temperature (say, less than 22C). When you look at the set chocolate, it should be smooth and perfect, there shouldn't be any streaks or dots on it. You can get away with a few streaks/dots - this means you just need to stir it a bit more to create more crystals.

 

You won't get the reflective shine on an enrobed chocolate that you do with a moulded chocolate. The best you can hope for is smooth and perfect, but not shiny!


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#314 Tania

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Posted 01 April 2014 - 03:04 AM

I've been hearing that using an instant-read thermometer really help, have you ever tried it?



#315 mrk

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 04:21 AM

I used to tempering chocolate many time was success, but recently have problem in tempering, I used "seeding method" to tempering and below is my process

 

300g dark chocolate, 100g for "seed"

 

step1: melt chocolate the temperature reach about 46C-48C (recommend temperature of chocolate brand)

 

step2: drop "seed"chocolate in melt chocolate to stirring bring down temperature to 31C-32C

 

step3: test the result

 

Why I wasn't success of result? what part have problem? Thank

 

 



#316 Kerry Beal

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 04:47 AM

At what temperature did your seed all melt?  You need to have a tiny bit of unmelted seed when you get down to your working temperature - which will be around 33-34 for dark.



#317 danield

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 10:53 AM

what is the exact problem?

 

are you using right "seed" chocolate?

It must be perfectly tempered unmelted chocolate so the right crystals can seed.

 

are you using enough seed chocolate?

Does it all melt? If so, try to use more.

 

today i saw a video on youtube about chocolate tempering with seeding method. Maybe you are interested in it:

 

he uses one big piece of chocolate for seeding and removes it when the chocolate reaches working temp.

 

31-32°C is the right working temperature for dark chocolate.


Edited by danield, 25 May 2014 - 10:54 AM.


#318 mrk

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 11:30 PM

At what temperature did your seed all melt?  You need to have a tiny bit of unmelted seed when you get down to your working temperature - which will be around 33-34 for dark.

I think 38C the seed all melt



#319 mrk

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 11:35 PM

what is the exact problem?

 

are you using right "seed" chocolate?

It must be perfectly tempered unmelted chocolate so the right crystals can seed.

 

are you using enough seed chocolate?

Does it all melt? If so, try to use more.

 

today i saw a video on youtube about chocolate tempering with seeding method. Maybe you are interested in it:

 

he uses one big piece of chocolate for seeding and removes it when the chocolate reaches working temp.

 

31-32°C is the right working temperature for dark chocolate.

I don't know what is problem, I using right "seed" chocolate 

the seed all melt at 37C-38C, if I add more "seed" than temperature reach 31-32C, the seed not all melt



#320 keychris

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 01:53 AM

if I add more "seed" than temperature reach 31-32C, the seed not all melt

 

This simply means you added a little too much seed the second time around.

 

A different way to seed is to add that 100g in three batches, ie. about 33g at a time. When the first handful of seed melts, add the second, when that melts, add the final handful.

 

The most important thing to remember is you're trying to create these stable crystals, and they melt at too high a temperature. So if all of your seed has melted at 38C, you don't have anything to do the seeding at 32C. You can always add a tiny bit of seed when the chocolate reaches the temperatures Kerry mentions, and let that tiny amount melt out with the last degree or two.



#321 Kerry Beal

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Posted 26 May 2014 - 06:25 AM

What I do when I get down to my working temperature if there is too much seed - is to microwave for 6 to 8 seconds at a time on high, stirring well until it melts out - being careful not to exceed my maximum working temperatures.  



#322 mrk

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 12:34 AM

This simply means you added a little too much seed the second time around.

 

A different way to seed is to add that 100g in three batches, ie. about 33g at a time. When the first handful of seed melts, add the second, when that melts, add the final handful.

 

The most important thing to remember is you're trying to create these stable crystals, and they melt at too high a temperature. So if all of your seed has melted at 38C, you don't have anything to do the seeding at 32C. You can always add a tiny bit of seed when the chocolate reaches the temperatures Kerry mentions, and let that tiny amount melt out with the last degree or two.

Hi keychris, I follow your method but not success, could you post your whole process because I found out some book that said melt chocolate to 45-50C and than seeding cool down to 27C and reheat to 32C, but another book just seeding cool down to 32C, I really confusion

before always tempering chocolate success in winter, in this summer my room temprature around 25C(in air condition) that factor will affect my result? Thank



#323 mrk

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 12:39 AM

What I do when I get down to my working temperature if there is too much seed - is to microwave for 6 to 8 seconds at a time on high, stirring well until it melts out - being careful not to exceed my maximum working temperatures.  

I get tiny seed into chocolate and all melt at 33-34C and than stir cool down at 32C but result also fail, I don't why before success experience I also do that



#324 Kerry Beal

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Posted 30 May 2014 - 05:05 PM

So - there are a couple of ways to temper dark chocolate - 

 

1.  Heat up to around 45 C, cool down to 27 - reheat to 32,33.  Dropping to 27C promotes the growth of all but one of the 6 types of crystals.  Heating up again to the working temperature melts all but the form V crystals.  So when you are done you have a bunch of form V crystals that will reproduce in the bowl.

 

2.  Heat up to around 45C, seed chocolate introduced - cool down with seed in place until you reach the working temperature of 32, 33C.  As long as there is some seed present when you get down to the working temperature - you will have a bunch of form V crystals in the bowl that will reproduce themselves.



#325 mrk

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 05:58 PM

So - there are a couple of ways to temper dark chocolate - 

 

1.  Heat up to around 45 C, cool down to 27 - reheat to 32,33.  Dropping to 27C promotes the growth of all but one of the 6 types of crystals.  Heating up again to the working temperature melts all but the form V crystals.  So when you are done you have a bunch of form V crystals that will reproduce in the bowl.

 

2.  Heat up to around 45C, seed chocolate introduced - cool down with seed in place until you reach the working temperature of 32, 33C.  As long as there is some seed present when you get down to the working temperature - you will have a bunch of form V crystals in the bowl that will reproduce themselves.

I success, I think the problem is room temperature too hot, Thank you



#326 Kerry Beal

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 06:06 PM

Glad it worked out - it's hard to get the right temperatures when your room is too hot.  When I've had that problem I've sometimes had to cool the chocolate over a bowl of cold or even ice water to get it down the the lowest temperature.



#327 mrk

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Posted 04 June 2014 - 11:40 PM

Glad it worked out - it's hard to get the right temperatures when your room is too hot.  When I've had that problem I've sometimes had to cool the chocolate over a bowl of cold or even ice water to get it down the the lowest temperature.

yes, in winter is easy to get result but in summer room temperature just about 25C even turn on air conditioner, Thank your advice



#328 mrk

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 01:21 AM

Glad it worked out - it's hard to get the right temperatures when your room is too hot.  When I've had that problem I've sometimes had to cool the chocolate over a bowl of cold or even ice water to get it down the the lowest temperature.

Oh, I'm feel frustrate, I try many time again just a few good result, any suggest tempering chocolate work out with room temperature at 25C-28C. Thanks



#329 Kerry Beal

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 05:42 PM

Try cooling over a bowl of cold water.



#330 mrk

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 06:12 PM

Try cooling over a bowl of cold water.

you mean when seeding at the same time cooling over a bowl of cold water?







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