Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Parsi cuisine

Indian

  • Please log in to reply
78 replies to this topic

#61 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 06 December 2006 - 06:33 PM

Can't find the link to "the egg files" forum, so I am posting it here



Tambotu Per Edu (Egg with tomatoes, onions and spices)
Posted Image


Akoori w/ Roti
Posted Image


Papeta Per Edu (Egg with potatoes, onions and spices - variation on above dish)
Posted Image

Also made some Sali Gosht (sweet & sour lamb/goat with potato sticks)
Posted Image

#62 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 28 January 2007 - 01:48 PM

Methi Per Edu
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#63 Pan

Pan
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 15,543 posts
  • Location:East Village, Manhattan

Posted 28 January 2007 - 11:36 PM

What other than methi (fenugreek, right?) is in that dish?

#64 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 30 January 2007 - 12:44 PM

It had sauteed onions, tumeric, chili pepper, garlic, cumin, cilantro and 1/2 a tomato.
Someone gave me a tip on using Alpha Alpha sprouts, which is what I substituted for methi. The taste and texture was close.

#65 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 14 July 2007 - 09:21 AM

Another version of Methi per Edu - shallots, spring onions, garlic, tumeric, cumin, chili powder, tomatoes and alpha-alpha sprouts. Sautee for a few minutes and then crack the eggs on top with some water and cover to steam.
Posted Image

Plated....
Posted Image

#66 The Cookbook Addict

The Cookbook Addict
  • participating member
  • 11 posts

Posted 16 February 2008 - 01:25 PM

I am so excited to see there are threads about Parsi cooking...

I just learned about Parsi cooking reviewing My Bombay Kitchen by Nilafour Ichaporia King on my blog. Have any of you tried it? I would be so curious to know what those familiar with Parsi cooking thought of it. I loved the recipes but have not background to know how they compare to other Parsi recipes.

Any thoughts?

#67 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 18 February 2008 - 04:36 PM

Welcome to the thread Cookbook Addict. I have ordered her book and will let you know once I have a chance to review it.

BTW, a while back there was a thread on how many cookbooks eGullet members have and based on your handle, I am curious :rolleyes:

#68 The Cookbook Addict

The Cookbook Addict
  • participating member
  • 11 posts

Posted 18 February 2008 - 07:25 PM

Welcome to the thread Cookbook Addict. I have ordered her book and will let you know once I have a chance to review it.

BTW, a while back there was a thread on how many cookbooks eGullet members have and based on your handle, I am curious  :rolleyes:

View Post


Hey Percyn,

Look forward to hearing about your impressions of the book. I was so excited about it because they were some recipes, like patrel, that I had never seen in a cookbook before. I also loved the chickpea stew and the biryani recipes.

I have a serious cookbook purchasing problem and my collection easily runs into the hundreds. I have started a blog to justify my addiction, where I review a different cookbook each week. Makes for a lot of messy dishes but so far we are having a lot of fun with it. Eventually I will have to donate some of my books, though, since we do live in a space-challenged nyc apartment.

#69 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 27 February 2008 - 06:27 PM

Hey Percyn,

Look forward to hearing about your impressions of the book.  I was so excited about it because they were some recipes, like patrel, that I had never seen in a cookbook before.  I also loved the chickpea stew and the biryani recipes.
...

Well, I finally got a copy of the book a few days ago and while I have not had a chance to make any of the dishes, I did flip through the book and recognize many of the recipes.

The book has a combination of traditional Parsi recipes such as the patrel, patra ni machi (fish wrapped in banana leaf), Bombay duck (a fish), etc, but also had quite a few recipes that I seemed to borrow Western ingredients and techniques. There is nothing wrong with that and in fact we Parsi's pride ourselves of our ability to adopt the best from various cultures while preserving our own, which the author also seems to point out.

I was pleasantly surprised to see anthropological details scattered throughout the book along with personal family stories and memories, which made me reminisce some of my own. Yes, I was lucky to be born in a Bombay kitchen.

If you liked this book and are looking for authentic Parsi recipes, try Jamva Chaloji or PM me for some unpublished hand written recipes.

Cheers
Percy

P,.S: Nice blog Cookbook Addict

#70 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 09 March 2008 - 05:41 PM

Patra Ni Machi - Fish on Banana Leaves
Fish covered in Cilantro and mint chutney, wrapped in banana leaves and steamed.
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

#71 edsel

edsel
  • participating member
  • 984 posts
  • Location:NEO (North-East Ohio), US

Posted 20 March 2008 - 09:34 AM

There was a lovely story about Parsi food on NPR this morning: Sugar in the Milk: A Parsi Kitchen Story They interviewed Niloufer Ichaporia King, who shares some recipes on the linked page. Alice Waters was so enchanted with Parsi cooking that she decided to do a special Parsi New Year menu. It's on the Chez Panisse Downstairs menu for March 20:

Thursday, March 20        Special Dinner: Parsi New Year      $125
Pomegranate Kir royal
Cashews with ajwain, toasted papads with tamarind chutney, allium stew, and pickles
Ritual dal with spiced ghee
Prawn, squid, and line-caught monkfish brochettes with fresh turmeric and chiles
Green masala biryani with Cattail Creek lamb, spring vegetables, crispy onions, and pistachios
Passion fruit ice
Faluda and sweets
Lemongrass-mint tisane



#72 Andrew Fenton

Andrew Fenton
  • participating member
  • 3,352 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 20 March 2008 - 12:01 PM

Patra Ni Machi - Fish on Banana Leaves
Fish covered in Cilantro and mint chutney, wrapped in banana leaves and steamed.


Having tried Percy's patra ni machi, I can confirm just how tasty it is! Really good stuff.

Percy, I was looking for recipes on line and found a number of variations... is the cilantro/mint a traditional variation, or your twist?

#73 KatieLoeb

KatieLoeb
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 9,156 posts
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 20 March 2008 - 01:05 PM

Yes Percy, please share the chutney recipe! I will second Andrew's endorsement of Percy's patra ni machi. It's absolutely delicious. I suspect that chutney would work well on other things like chicken or pork too.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol


#74 handmc

handmc
  • participating member
  • 778 posts
  • Location:PA

Posted 20 March 2008 - 01:08 PM

I have never seem this thread before, Oh My God the food!

I had to take a Zocor after I finished looking at Percy's eggs. Percy, did you go to a summer camp or take a college course to learn to cook eggs the way you do, I have never seen thier equal.

**************************************************
Ah, it's been way too long since I did a butt. - Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"



--------------------
One summers evening drunk to hell, I sat there nearly lifeless…Warren

#75 The Cookbook Addict

The Cookbook Addict
  • participating member
  • 11 posts

Posted 21 March 2008 - 07:33 AM

[/quote]
Well, I finally got a copy of the book a few days ago and while I have not had a chance to make any of the dishes, I did flip through the book and recognize many of the recipes.

The book has a combination of traditional Parsi recipes such as the patrel, patra ni machi (fish wrapped in banana leaf), Bombay duck (a fish), etc, but also had quite a few recipes that I seemed to borrow Western ingredients and techniques. There is nothing wrong with that and in fact we Parsi's pride ourselves of our ability to adopt the best from various cultures while preserving our own, which the author also seems to point out.

I was pleasantly surprised to see anthropological details scattered throughout the book along with personal family stories and memories, which made me reminisce some of my own. Yes, I was lucky to be born in a Bombay kitchen.

If you liked this book and are looking for authentic Parsi recipes, try Jamva Chaloji or PM me for some unpublished hand written recipes.

Cheers
Percy

P,.S: Nice blog Cookbook Addict

View Post

[/quote]

Thanks Percy! I will definitely check that book out. Your food pics look amazing, I am going to have to try one of the recipes you have posted.

Re: the NPR segment on Nilofour Ichaporia King - the recipes from the Parsi New Year at Chez Panisse are in King's book. The New Year's milkshake with the rose syrup and basil seeds in it is a really lovely and easy dessert, perfect for when you want something simple to end a complex, spicy meal. I'm going to use that when I cook from Bombay Kitchen for company.

#76 v. gautam

v. gautam
  • participating member
  • 631 posts

Posted 21 March 2008 - 01:59 PM

Today, March 21, being Navroze, the auspicious New Year's day for many Parsis, here's something about the day's festivities :

http://www.thestar.c.../article/347365

#77 edsel

edsel
  • participating member
  • 984 posts
  • Location:NEO (North-East Ohio), US

Posted 23 March 2008 - 09:55 AM

I made falooda last night at a friends birthday party. The basil seeds swell up to an astonishing extent. Two tablespoons of the dry seeds made way too much soaked. :rolleyes:

The rose syrup at my local South Asian grocery seemed to be mostly citric acid. :huh: so I made saffron syrup instead as suggested in this Gothamist blog entry. I'm not sure how authentically Parsi that is, but it was tasty! I topped it with ice cream made with almond milk - again, maybe not authentic, but we liked it.

Posted Image
Posted Image
Posted Image

#78 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 28 March 2008 - 01:41 PM

Thanks all !! Sorry for the delay in responding, I was away traveling.
edsel, your Falooda looks great!! As for my eggs...I just like eggs and have sufficient practice :raz:

Katie/Andrew, glad you enjoyed the Patra ni Machi. The chutney is pretty easy, add some cilantro, mint, ginger, dried coconut, vinegar, sugar and salt in a blender.

Marinate the fish with tumeric, chili powder and some salt for about an hour and then cover with the chutney. If you don't have banana leaves, you can simply wrap the fish in foil and steam it or place it under the broiler.

Enjoy...

#79 percyn

percyn
  • society donor
  • 2,592 posts

Posted 29 March 2008 - 07:25 AM

Few more Parsi style eggs....

Akoori w/whole wheat pita (didn't have roti)
Posted Image

Parsi Poro - Omlette with Cilantro, Garlic and Green Chilies
Posted Image





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Indian