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110 replies to this topic

#91 torakris

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 06:07 PM

simmered hijiki last night :biggrin:
with aburage (tofu pockets) and edamame

Posted Image

sorry really bad picture...

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#92 torakris

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Posted 07 November 2005 - 11:39 PM

wakame salad with onions and dressed with a mixture of ponzu and garlic oil

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#93 helenjp

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Posted 08 November 2005 - 04:47 PM

Torakris, that looks good! I was just racking my brains for salads that don't require same-day shopping, and which can sit for an hour or two without harm. (Just wait till your kids get older, and you'll understand the need for this kind of recipe!).

Jason, I'm afraid my husband would happily fill a 9" plate with konbu and eat it all up! I've just been cautioned that my oden doesn't contain enough tied konbu strips :shock:

A well-known Japanese food writer advocated separating the New Year konbu rolls into empty rolls of konbu (rolled a bit loosely, so that the broth gets right inside the roll) and chicken wings or drumsticks, cooked together but served separately., since everybody prefers the konbu itself to the usual filling of oversweet preserved herring. This "karappo konbu" dish is a big favorite in my home, though sometimes I roll the konbu around gobo (burdock root) instead of leaving the rolls empty.

#94 torakris

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Posted 09 November 2005 - 12:58 AM

Two nights ago I soaked a little (ok a lot) more wakame than I needed to last night we had a another wakame salad.
This time with tofu and a prepared creamy sesame dressing.

Posted Image

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#95 torakris

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Posted 10 December 2005 - 03:58 PM

I am not sure why my hijiki pictures always turn out so bad.... :hmmm:

Posted Image

simmered with satsumage (deep fied fish paste cake) and carrots

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#96 torakris

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Posted 23 December 2005 - 06:56 PM

mozoku (type of seaweed) in a vinegar dressing (dashi, vinegar, soy sauce and sugar) with kinkan (kumquats) from my garden

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#97 torakris

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Posted 30 January 2006 - 07:47 PM

wakame and nagaimo salad with Korean style seasonings (chile pepper, soy, vinegar and sesame oil)

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#98 torakris

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 04:57 PM

I have been on a wakame kick lately....

wakame and alfalfa sprout salad with sesame dressing (sorry for the blurry picture)

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#99 BarbaraY

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 11:09 AM

Yesterday, I received an order from my favorite on-line source for Japanese foodstuffs. Somehow I managed to order SHIRAKIKU KIZAMI KONBU and I haven't any idea how to use it.
Any help would be appreciated.

#100 torakris

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Posted 31 March 2006 - 04:28 PM

I ahve purchased this a couple times and find it goes well with simmered dishes. Here are some examples:

takikomi gohan (fist one)

simmered with pork

and of course one of my favorite dishes
matsumaezuke

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#101 BarbaraY

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Posted 04 April 2006 - 12:03 PM

I ahve purchased this a couple times and find it goes well with simmered dishes. Here are some examples:

takikomi gohan (fist one)

simmered with pork

and of course one of my favorite dishes
matsumaezuke

View Post


Thank you for responding, however I can't read Japanese so I can only guess.
I can see the matsumaezuke has carrots and the kombu but do I see shiratake in it, too?
Do you rehydrate the kombu before adding to the other ingredients?

#102 Hiroyuki

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 04:37 AM

I ahve purchased this a couple times and find it goes well with simmered dishes. Here are some examples:

takikomi gohan (fist one)

simmered with pork

and of course one of my favorite dishes
matsumaezuke

View Post


Thank you for responding, however I can't read Japanese so I can only guess.
I can see the matsumaezuke has carrots and the kombu but do I see shiratake in it, too?
Do you rehydrate the kombu before adding to the other ingredients?

View Post

I bought a bag of kizami kombu at the 100-yen shop! :biggrin:
The instructions on the package say to soak in water for 1-2 minutes and rince well.

What may look shirataki (you mean shirataki not shiratake, right?) is actually dried squid (surume).

I'll post a picture here when I make some dish with the kizami kombu.

#103 BarbaraY

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Posted 06 April 2006 - 07:44 AM

Yes, shirataki not shiratake.:biggrin: That helps.

#104 Hiroyuki

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Posted 08 April 2006 - 02:12 PM

I ended up making the same old nimono (simmered dish), using kizami kombu, carrot, shiitake, uchi mame (beaten soybeans?), and aburaage. Sorry, I can't be creative with stuff like this...
Posted Image

#105 BarbaraY

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Posted 09 April 2006 - 08:35 AM

I ended up making the same old nimono (simmered dish), using kizami kombu, carrot, shiitake, uchi mame (beaten soybeans?), and aburaage.  Sorry, I can't be creative with stuff like this...
Posted Image

View Post

Thanks Hiroyuki, That looks like something close to what I could do. No aburage or uchi mame here but I think I could work around that.

#106 Hiroyuki

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Posted 11 May 2006 - 03:47 PM

Did you watch the May 10 edition of Tameshite Gatten on NHK, which featured hijiki? I didn't, but here is the webpage on that edition:
http://www3.nhk.or.j...2/20060510.html
(Japanese only, of course)
An interesting topic is a new way to cook hijiki. The webpage says that hijiki is simmered for four hours on the site of production, so it doesn't require much cooking in the home kitchen. The new way is to simmer it for only three minutes. The details are as follows:
1. Reconstitute hijiki by soaking it in water for 30 minutes. (In the meantime, make dashi.)
2. Wring hijiki lightly, spread it on a plate, and heat it in a microwave (for 1 minute and 30 seconds for 10-g dried hijiki) with no plastic wrap on.
3. Fry other ingredients in oil, such as carrots and aburaage.
4. When they are cooked, add hijiki and dashi.
5. Simmer for 3 minutes. The dashi is now absorbed in hijiki and other ingredients.

I will try this way and report back.
So far, I have usually simmered hijiki for about ten minutes.
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#107 torakris

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Posted 02 February 2007 - 05:37 PM

I just thought I would add a link to the quite long Chuka wakame thread.

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#108 _john

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 05:58 AM

I went to a new yakionigiri chain the other day called "yakioni". their nori was incredibly fragrant. it reminded me to ask how to achieve really fragrant, crunchy, nori? I have bought many types of average supermarket nori, roasted it myself, for things like onigiri or makizushi but it has never come close to matching the fragrant, crunchy, nori of high quality sushi restaurants or these particular yakionigiri. what is it exactly? roasting technique? expensive nori?

#109 helenjp

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 07:31 PM

Pretty hard to figure out what somebody else ate, but could it be Japan's answer to Korean nori? Brush the nori lightly with sesame oil, sprinkle with a little dry-fried coarse sea salt (yaki-shio) and toast lightly.

Apart from that, expensive nori is probably part of the answer - there is a lot of variation. I discovered that from the bottom up, by buying nori at discount groceries - it looks like and tastes like old, discolored, lace curtains.

And then there was the black nori (the unpressed dried "clusters" of nori) that released red (dye???) into the water when I tried to make nori-chazuke out of it.

#110 Hiroyuki

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Posted 08 November 2007 - 10:03 PM

John, you remind me of something I have forgotten for decades: Roasting nori! We used to do that when I was small, but not any longer. Pre-roasted nori is so prevalent these days.

I know how to roast nori, but I can't say I'm particularly good at it. High-quality nori is a must, of course. Black and thick. Green and thin ones are no good.

Place a clean fish grill free from odor, which you can get at a 100-yen shop, on the burner.
Set the heat low.
Start roasting a sheet of nori, first at a distance, say 20 to 30 cm above the grill, holding two diagonal corners of the sheet with your both hands, constantly flipping it upside down. When it's dried enough, bring it near the grill, holding one corner of the sheet with one hand, again constantly flipping it upside down. Keep roasting until the black nori turns nice and green entirely.

Some people roast two sheets of nori at a time. Maybe you should ask someone around you, they will be willing to tell you how.

#111 Dan Nguyen

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Posted 11 August 2013 - 06:53 AM

Did you watch the May 10 edition of Tameshite Gatten on NHK, which featured hijiki? I didn't, but here is the webpage on that edition:
http://www3.nhk.or.j...2/20060510.html
(Japanese only, of course)
An interesting topic is a new way to cook hijiki. The webpage says that hijiki is simmered for four hours on the site of production, so it doesn't require much cooking in the home kitchen. The new way is to simmer it for only three minutes. The details are as follows:
1. Reconstitute hijiki by soaking it in water for 30 minutes. (In the meantime, make dashi.)
2. Wring hijiki lightly, spread it on a plate, and heat it in a microwave (for 1 minute and 30 seconds for 10-g dried hijiki) with no plastic wrap on.
3. Fry other ingredients in oil, such as carrots and aburaage.
4. When they are cooked, add hijiki and dashi.
5. Simmer for 3 minutes. The dashi is now absorbed in hijiki and other ingredients.

I will try this way and report back.
So far, I have usually simmered hijiki for about ten minutes.

 Thankyou Hiroyuki for this information, I am new and love Japanese salad !







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