Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

Seaweed

Asian

  • Please log in to reply
110 replies to this topic

#31 Katherine

Katherine
  • participating member
  • 1,515 posts

Posted 07 June 2003 - 05:15 AM

I know a woman whose mother, a native of Japan, came to visit her on the coast of Maine. They went for a walk on the beach, and the older woman gathered up an armful of the seaweed (the stringy kind with the bubbles in it), took it back to the house, prepared and served it.

#32 Nick

Nick
  • legacy participant
  • 1,782 posts

Posted 07 June 2003 - 06:08 AM

Here's the website of a company here in Maine that harvests and sells different sea weeds. I haven't heard of anyone "farming" weed in Maine.

#33 gus_tatory

gus_tatory
  • participating member
  • 967 posts

Posted 07 June 2003 - 09:23 AM

Katherine and others--
that's so cool that the older japanese woman was harvesting fucus (yes, that's the name for that burgundy, bubbled seaweed) for use!
my mom used to gather irish moss on nova scotia beaches for use in gelled desserts. it's harvested commercially, and used as a texturing agent--look at many, many foods and it's labelled as carageenan.

besides what FG mentioned about seaweeds tasting great, they're one of the only foods that have the spectrum of trace minerals in them, as of course their habitat is the sea...
"The cure for anything is salt water: sweat, tears, or the ocean."
--Isak Dinesen

#34 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 07 June 2003 - 04:48 PM

In Japan, it is done by both methods, though cultivation is much more popular.
There are even seaweed flats out in the middle of Tokyo Bay!

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#35 mudbug

mudbug
  • participating member
  • 523 posts

Posted 26 July 2003 - 04:14 PM

Looking for any information on how to use this "Land Seaweed"

The scientific/Latin/botanical name is Salsola komarovi.

How to eat this? Methods of preparation? Any help would be appreciated. Found the following pictures but not positive as to which is the most common for Okahijiki (assuming the last three).


Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Edited by mudbug, 26 July 2003 - 04:21 PM.


#36 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 26 July 2003 - 04:43 PM

okahijiki is used mostly in dressed salads (aemono) and vinegared salads (sunomono), it is especially wonderful in a shira-ae dressing:

http://recipes.egull...cipes/r328.html





edited to make me sound like I actually know English! :biggrin:

Edited by torakris, 26 July 2003 - 11:55 PM.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#37 mudbug

mudbug
  • participating member
  • 523 posts

Posted 26 July 2003 - 08:20 PM

torakris,

Thank you. Please tell me, is the okahijiki blanched first? Soaked in water? Also, could you please post the full version of a recipe for shira-ae with authentic ingredients?

I really know nothing so you'll have to tell me.

:smile:

Edited by mudbug, 26 July 2003 - 09:21 PM.


#38 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 26 July 2003 - 11:41 PM

to prepare okahijiki trim off the hard ends then blanch in salted water for a minute or so, refresh in an ice bath.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#39 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 27 July 2003 - 12:08 AM

about shira-ae

My posted recipe is sort of a quick version on the original which calls for the seame seeds to be roasted and then ground, I save a step (with no lack of flavor) by using seame paste.
There are not really any "traditional" ingredients, it is really one of those wonderful dishes that you can add any seasonal ingredient to. the most "traditional" one I can think of is something along the lines of gomoku (5 flavors) which would have 5 different ingredients preferably of different colors, such as shiitake, konnyaku, carrots, aburage and one or two green things (green vegetables, seaweed, cucumbers, etc).

I don't think I have ever made or eaten the same shira-ae twice.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#40 jackal10

jackal10
  • participating member
  • 5,036 posts

Posted 27 July 2003 - 12:34 AM

I think this stuff ( I'm growing some) i closely related to Samphire.

Boil briefly, butter, suk the flesh off the stems..

#41 jango

jango
  • participating member
  • 121 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 09 August 2003 - 05:12 AM

Is nori always sold already roasted?

Are there some kinds which are simply dried but not roasted?

If nori is green, but there is no mention of "roasting" on the label, do we presume that it is roasted?

Thanks for any enlightenment - I'm all googled out.
:blink:

#42 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 09 August 2003 - 02:41 PM

Actually most nori (in Japan at least) is sold unroasted allowing the person to roast it themselves be waving it over a gas flame.
Pre-roasted nori can be spotted by the words yaki nori on the package. It is preferable to roast nori before using it with sushi so some packets of yakinori may also be labeled as sushi nori. There is no need to toast the yaki nori types.

There is also flavored nori called ajitsuke nori that comes in various flavors most commonly soy, but 3 of my favorites are ume, wasbi and shiso (these may be hard to find out of Japan)

Another thing to remember about nori is that there are 2 kinds
asakusa nori which is harvested from bays
iwanori which is harvested from the shore
both are dried into flat sheets and look the same but asakusa is higher quality and preferable for sushi.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#43 jango

jango
  • participating member
  • 121 posts
  • Location:Sydney, Australia

Posted 10 August 2003 - 08:32 PM

Thanks for responding. Can I bug you with another question?

Do home cooks make sheets of nori themselves? And if they do does it taste better? - in the way that homemade pasta sheets taste better than storebought........ and homemade tortillas etc etc.

#44 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 11 August 2003 - 01:24 AM

this doesn't really answer your question but it is an interesting article about the history of nori:

http://www.sushiandt...healthNori2.htm

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#45 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 18 August 2003 - 02:56 PM

Thanks for responding.  Can I bug you with another question?

Do home cooks make sheets of nori themselves?  And if they do does it taste better?  - in the way that homemade pasta sheets taste better than storebought........ and homemade tortillas etc etc.

I have been looking around and asking around about making your own nori, it seems to be one of those things akin to candle making in the US. Basically it is only down in those touristy historical village type areas where you pay someone to teach you and you walk away with one sheet. From what I can gather it was rarely made at home, either it was made by the local "nori maker" or maybe made in groups.
I am sure like most handmade products the handmade nori probably tastes better but I can't find anyone who has tasted it......... :wink:

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#46 jrufusj

jrufusj
  • participating member
  • 382 posts
  • Location:London, England

Posted 27 August 2003 - 06:40 AM

How funny we should be talking about how/where nori is made...

Saturday night we had a cocktail party with about 25 people and, among other things, I made a huge batch of hosu maki. When we were toasting the nori, my almost 5 year-old son was going on and on asking about how nori was made and I only escaped the repetitive (you understand what I mean if you have kids that age) questioning by promising to arrange a visit to a nori "plant".

Of course, being the inquisitive, food-driven type I am, I am secretly looking forward to the field trip as well.

Any suggestions?

Also, re: flavored nori -- in Korea, except for sushi nori, almost all nori is salted and fairly heavily flavored with sesame oil. Delicious as a snack or a garnish for plain gohan, but pretty useless for most food combinations.

Thanks in advance for any "field trip" tips. Either Korea or Japan are convenient possibilities, as I kind of live back and forth between the two.

Jim
Jim Jones
Tokyo, Japan

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

#47 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 27 August 2003 - 03:37 PM

How funny we should be talking about how/where nori is made...

Saturday night we had a cocktail party with about 25 people and, among other things, I made a huge batch of hosu maki.  When we were toasting the nori, my almost 5 year-old son was going on and on asking about how nori was made and I only escaped the repetitive (you understand what I mean if you have kids that age) questioning by promising to arrange a visit to a nori "plant".

I know nothing about places in Korea, but I am sure in most of the coastal areas that are famous for their nori, they will let you watch it being made.
Here is one place in Mie-ken that actually lets you make it!

http://www.geocities...ajyuunosato.htm
Japanese only

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#48 FoodZealot

FoodZealot
  • participating member
  • 740 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 03 September 2003 - 03:54 PM

Everyone, thank you for the info about the various kinds of nori.

I was just reminded of one of my recent obsessions - noriten. It's essentially a piece of nori that is dipped in tempura batter (usually one side), then fried crisp. My local noodle place puts one piece in the assorted tempura. Deep fried umami!

It's also available in bags like potato chips at a Japanese market. Unfortunately, these are loaded with fat, preservatives and sodium. I get them in the small bag...

~Tad

#49 FoodZealot

FoodZealot
  • participating member
  • 740 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles, CA

Posted 22 September 2003 - 12:17 PM

I went to my favorite Korean market and remembered the discussion of Korean sesame oil seasoned nori. On top of that, there was a woman handing out samples, and I got a bunch. As billed, it's delicious and crispy, too. Thanks, everyone.

BTW, when toasting nori, I suggest that you take care to not burn it, as it causes a peculiar and, to me, unappetizing smell - kinda smells like burnt hair.

~Tad

edit: used incorrect definition of an eGullet moment

Edited by FoodZealot, 22 September 2003 - 12:33 PM.


#50 dornachu

dornachu
  • participating member
  • 90 posts

Posted 29 September 2003 - 01:11 PM

Hi all-

I'm new to this forum, but what a WONDERFUL place to learn about japanese culture/food/ even the language!! (daily nihongo)!!

I was trying to replicate the wakame salad that one can get at a regular japanese restaurant, but without success. I bought one of those dried seaweed (fuero wakame, spelling??!) soak themin water, and blanched it breifly, but the texture came out to be sort of slimy! Also the ones I had at the restaurant has this gelatin thing...so yummy. Can someone please teach me how to do it? and what kind of wakame to get? Thank you!!

Dorna

#51 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 29 September 2003 - 04:00 PM

Dorna,
welcome to egullet and the Japan Forum! :biggrin:

About the seaweed salad

Your wakame probably became slimy becasue it was overcooked, wakame needs a gentle handling and is best prepared right before serving. For a salad you should soak it in warm water for the specified time and then rinse it in cold water.

For a variety of seaweeds in your salad look for something called kaisou sarada 海草サラダ or seaweed salad, this a mix of various seaweeds and often even contains a dressing packet. Or look for kaisou mikkusu 海草ミックスor seaweed mix which is a package or various seaweeds. If there is nothing like this available then you may need to buy individual seaweeds, good ones for salad are:

aka-tosaka nori -- this is the lacey red one (aka meaning red) this is also available in green (ao-tosaka nori) and white (shiro-tosaka nori)

shiro-ogo nori -- the white "crunchy" one" also available in light green (ogo nori)

matsu nori and fu nori are also nice additions to salads

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#52 dornachu

dornachu
  • participating member
  • 90 posts

Posted 29 September 2003 - 05:34 PM

Thank you !! Now how about the dressing? I only remember quite a strong taste of sesame oil.....

#53 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 29 September 2003 - 05:49 PM

Thank you !! Now how about the dressing?  I only remember quite a strong taste of sesame oil.....

it seems the most popular dressing for seaweed salads is a dressing made with soy sauce, rice vinegar, sesame oil and a pinch of sugar

I like to thow some chunks of tofu in my salad and dress it with a (purchased) sesame dressing for a quick meal.

in Japan it is also popular to dress it with the non-oil shiso or yuzu dressings.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#54 helenjp

helenjp
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,232 posts

Posted 30 September 2003 - 06:51 AM

Also the "fueru wakame" is never going to have the best texture. It is DEFINITELY easy to use, but salted wakame or even fresh, is much nicer. Sad, but true. :sad:

#55 Aix

Aix
  • participating member
  • 85 posts

Posted 27 April 2004 - 01:44 PM

I was excited to find little packages of what appears to be salted wakame in a specialized Japanese grocery store. I didn't give it a second thought since I love fresh seaweed salad.

How do you prepare this? I suppose it needs to soak? Does it have to be blanched? Any technique or recipe? I'm guessing rice vinegar, mirin, sugar, sesame oil, sesame seeds and red chilies, right?

I also have various dry seaweed in my cupboard. Should I combine?

TIA

#56 torakris

torakris
  • manager
  • 11,008 posts
  • Location:Cleveland Heights, Ohio

Posted 27 April 2004 - 03:32 PM

Salted seaweed needs to be washed well and then soaked to rid it of the excess salt. Wash it well under running water sort of rubbing it together, then soak it in water for 15 to 20 minutes. Taste it to see if it is too salty, occasionally it might need to be rubbed under the water a liittle more.

It is now ready to be used, it can be added to soups, made into salds, it is even good in quick stirfries.
I love seaweeds salads, I mix a couple of varieties of seawed together and then dress it with a simple "wafu" (Japanese style dressing) made with oil, soy sauce and rice vinegar and embellished with what ever I am feeling like at the moment. Maybe a couple drops of sesame oil and some freshyly toasted and crushed sesame seeds, of some smashed up umeboshi (pickled plums), or maybe with a lot of shredded shiso and maybe some myoga or ginger as well.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"
Manager, Membership
kwagner@egstaff.org


#57 Hiroyuki

Hiroyuki
  • participating member
  • 5,124 posts
  • Location:Shiozawa area of Minami Uonuma city, Niigata, Japan

Posted 27 April 2004 - 05:54 PM

My wife and I seldom buy salted wakame partly because of its high price, but we sometimes make a simple salad with dry wakame and enoki mushrooms.

Dressing that we use with this salad:

Soy sause : Vinegar : Sesame seed oil = 1 : 1 : 0.5

#58 Aix

Aix
  • participating member
  • 85 posts

Posted 28 April 2004 - 11:12 AM

Thank you both.

I rinsed the seaweed in 2-3 changes of water and didn't find that it required much soaking as it was not salty at all. I haven't made salad yet; I used it in miso soup. It was amazing. What a beautiful food... great texture too.

Regarding the price: my small bag of salted seaweed cost me C$2.99 and will give me five times the yield of the $5 bags of dried seaweed. Go figure the fresh stuff would be cheaper up here.

#59 Aix

Aix
  • participating member
  • 85 posts

Posted 02 May 2004 - 05:12 PM

What seaweed is usually used in the ubiquitous green seaweed salad you find in Japanese restaurants? It looks like a much brighter green seaweed, with a few clear strands. It's not as flat as wakame either. Any idea?

#60 Hiroyuki

Hiroyuki
  • participating member
  • 5,124 posts
  • Location:Shiozawa area of Minami Uonuma city, Niigata, Japan

Posted 02 May 2004 - 07:09 PM

There is a tip: Wakame turns to green as soon as you put it in boiling hot water. Then, you have to put it in cold water immediately. This way, wakeme retains its vidid green.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Asian