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The Kimchi Topic


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197 replies to this topic

#181 nakji

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Posted 08 July 2010 - 09:13 PM

I've made radish kimchi without them, and it tasted fine to me. I'm not sure if it would affect the flavour/fermentation of the kimchi over the long term, as I consumed the kimchi I made over about a two-week period.

#182 ZenKimchi

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 04:25 PM

Buddhist temple style kimchi uses overripened fruits, like persimmons. If you're interested in really extreme vegan Korean cuisine go for temple food. I think it's picking up as a trend with the general populace in Korea.
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#183 heidih

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Posted 14 July 2010 - 04:38 PM

Buddhist temple style kimchi uses overripened fruits, like persimmons. If you're interested in really extreme vegan Korean cuisine go for temple food. I think it's picking up as a trend with the general populace in Korea.


Is the over ripe fruit to provide the pungency that the absent seafood would or does it aid in fermentation? Interesting.

#184 Franci

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Posted 04 July 2012 - 03:43 AM

Hi.
Can anybody suggest which brand of korean pepper to buy for a pretty spicy kimchi? I would prefer a 100% korean pepper.
Do you also have a favourite brand of korean fish sauce?

If you can point me at an online store in the US it would be really appreciated.

Thanks.

#185 LynnFoodies

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Posted 24 July 2012 - 10:52 PM

Just bought a package of kimchi from the nearest Korean fast food.. How I wish that i can make this spicy food by my own :)
Love the taste so much
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#186 scolobey

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Posted 27 July 2012 - 09:29 PM

I made a really simple kimchi from shaved nasturtium pods. I though it made for a pretty cool, if labor intensive condiment. Nasturtium pods have an intense, almost wasabi like flavor, and when you cure them, they mellow a bit and get a little funky. Next time I'll add some chili and lemon.

#187 Ader1

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:33 AM

I would like to try making some kimchi.  I'm just wondering if any of you have bought any books on how to do this and if you have any suggestions? 



#188 Broken English

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 01:55 AM

I am also wondering if, since you can't get brine shrimp in Australia, you can substitute shrimp paste in equal quantity, or what a viable alternative would be.

Kimchi has quickly become one of my favourite foods since I started my last job, and I'd like to try my hand as well.

The key to the kimchi where I work is leaving it at room temp for a few days before refrigerating it. Well, at least that's what I'm told.
James.

#189 Ader1

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 02:00 AM

Thanks for the reply.  What kind of things do they eat it with at your restaurant?  I'm looking at a book on amazon called 'The kimchi Chronicles'.  It looks interesting.  It says it's for an American kitchen.



#190 Broken English

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Posted 31 July 2013 - 02:10 AM

At Momofuku, we've been serving it by itself, braising ribs in the kimchi base paste, using it with roasted cauliflower or brussels sprouts (usually white kimchi), making shrimp cracker style puffs with it using tapioca starch, and pureeing it for various accompaniments. The recipe in the Momofuku cookbook is a good start.
James.

#191 Ader1

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 01:34 AM

Broken English,

 

I've got a Momofoku cook-book.  Although I haven't tried any of their recipes yet.  I have now though just got together enough ingredients to make one of their somen noodle soups with tofu and potatoe if I remember correctly.  Maybe you are the person I should ask if I have any questions......?  I'm surprised there haven't been any more replies to this thread.  Thought kimchi would be quite popular.  What did you think of the book from amazon I mentioned above Broken English?



#192 Sally-chan

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Posted 01 August 2013 - 04:42 AM

There are some Korean recipes on the web you can try before purchasing a book. http://www.maangchi....-cabbage-kimchi or http://aeriskitchen....치baechu-kimchi/ are places to start. Although I have enjoyed the Momofuku cookbook, I found the kimchi too sweet for my taste. I've been influenced by my mom's Korean friends that make a spicier kimchi.

 

Making kimchi is a fun weekend project. For me, the joy of making my own kimchi is that I get to eat both fresh kimchi (which I really enjoy) as well as the fermented/funky kimchi. I find cucumber kimchi to be very refreshing in the summer. You may also want to take a peek and see if there are any tips in the Elsewhere in Asia/Pacific: Cooking & Baking forum. Good luck and let us know how your adventures go.



#193 Ader1

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 02:33 AM

I've been looking at the web site above Maangchi.com.  Really interesting.  She uses Napa cabbage.  I haven't seen it around here in the UK.  What could I use in it's place?   Any ideas?



#194 Ader1

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 04:37 PM

Anybody found a good supplier of gochugaru (chilli flakes) in the UK?



#195 Sally-chan

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 08:40 PM

Ader1, You might try bok choy as a substitute for napa cabbage. Also, Maangchi has a kimchi recipe using green cabbage (http://www.maangchi....ngbaechu-kimchi). I suspect the texture would be crunchier than napa.  Let us know how things turn out for you.



#196 heidih

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Posted 09 December 2013 - 09:21 PM

Young radish greens (from daikon) are also delicious. I imagine other radish greens would also work

#197 Franci

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 12:08 PM

I've been looking at the web site above Maangchi.com.  Really interesting.  She uses Napa cabbage.  I haven't seen it around here in the UK.  What could I use in it's place?   Any ideas?

You can find Napa Cabbage in the Uk, here at Ocado ex. but I remember buying also from Chinese stores in London

 

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#198 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 04 January 2014 - 04:23 PM

Yes, it's known as Chinese Leaf in the UK.