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The Kimchi Topic


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197 replies to this topic

#61 Jinmyo

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Posted 20 September 2003 - 06:46 PM

Picture yourself in a boat on a river,
With bulgogi trees and bibimbap skies.
Somebody calls you, you answer quite slowly,
A girl with oi sabagi eyes.
Yukkaejang flowers of yellow and green,
Towering over your head.
Look for the girl with the tteok in her eyes,
And she's gone.
Lucy in the sky with kimchi.
Follow her down to a bridge by a fountain
Where rocking horse people eat shikumichi pies,
Everyone smiles as you drift past the flowers,
That grow so incredibly high.
Ojingo taxis appear on the shore,
Waiting to take you away.
Climb in the back with your head in the clouds,
And you're gone.
Lucy in the sky with kimchi,
Picture yourself on a train in a station,
With baekche porters with yachaejon ties,
Suddenly someone is there at the turnstyle,
The girl with the oi sabagi eyes.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#62 torakris

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Posted 28 October 2003 - 03:59 PM

just what we all needed, the kimchi refrigerator!

http://www.acebiz.ne...ine/start2.html

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#63 jschyun

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Posted 30 October 2003 - 05:47 PM

Yeah, I guess these are really common in Korea, because all my relatives save one have a kimchi refrigerator.

I think they might even be selling them in L.A. now.
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#64 pastis

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 02:15 AM

yes. kimchi refrigerator is amazing. basically it provides same condition as storing kimchi in a pot under the ground. all koreans now have it.

my favorite kimchi is Bossam Kimchi- cabbage, octopus, chesnut, pine nut, date, other good things all wraped in a big cabbage.

#65 Jinmyo

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Posted 06 November 2003 - 07:52 AM

Welcome, pastis.

That kimchi sounds fabulous. Thanks for the link.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#66 viaChgo

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Posted 11 November 2003 - 03:45 PM

When I was a kid, growing up in Chicago, there was this pizza place we used to go to from time to time that was owned by Koreans. They made a kimchee pizza. It was basically a regular thin-crust pizza with kimchee under the cheese. I remember it being good when I was a kid. I don't remember what the place was called, where it was, or any details that would be helpful in this situation. I don't think it's around anymore.

#67 Human Bean

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Posted 09 December 2003 - 07:56 PM

When is my kimchi ready to eat?

I made my second ever batch of kimchi a couple of days ago. I'd made a batch several years ago, and it turned out quite well, but it's been long enough that I've forgotten the details of what I did.

It's a basic cabbage kimchi, improvised by looking at various recipes, then doing what seemed right at the time. When freshly made it smelled good, but obviously didn't have the depth of fragrance that it should ultimately have.

It's now been sitting about 48 hours at about 19-20 degrees C, and I think it's got about another 24 hours or so to be 'done,' but I'm not sure. How do I know when it's ready to refrigerate?

At the moment, it's fragrant enough to be noticeable in the kitchen and immediate vicinity; it still smells right, but isn't overpowering.

Today, there were a few bubbles in the liquid (among the cabbage and at the top) but not many.

Needless to say, there is no evidence of mold or bacteria. If there were (and I think it'd have to have MAJOR problems for this to happen), I'd toss it.

I think I'm looking for a bit more smell, and some more bubbles, but I'm not sure. Advice?

#68 jrufusj

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 11:54 AM

When is my kimchi ready to eat?

I made my second ever batch of kimchi a couple of days ago. I'd made a batch several years ago, and it turned out quite well, but it's been long enough that I've forgotten the details of what I did.

It's a basic cabbage kimchi, improvised by looking at various recipes, then doing what seemed right at the time. When freshly made it smelled good, but obviously didn't have the depth of fragrance that it should ultimately have.

It's now been sitting about 48 hours at about 19-20 degrees C, and I think it's got about another 24 hours or so to be 'done,' but I'm not sure. How do I know when it's ready to refrigerate?

At the moment, it's fragrant enough to be noticeable in the kitchen and immediate vicinity; it still smells right, but isn't overpowering.

Today, there were a few bubbles in the liquid (among the cabbage and at the top) but not many.

Needless to say, there is no evidence of mold or bacteria. If there were (and I think it'd have to have MAJOR problems for this to happen), I'd toss it.

I think I'm looking for a bit more smell, and some more bubbles, but I'm not sure. Advice?

I hope that people like Jinmyo and Kristen who prepare kimchi frequently will chime in, but I would ask a few questions before I answer.

What did you use for jeotgal? How much did you use? The stronger and the more jeotgal (fermented seafood) that you used, the shorter your fermentation would normally be, simply because the flavors will already be stronger. Similarly, I would use less warm fermentation time the more garlic I included. If it is a more gentle ginger-dominated kimchee like many Chinese restaurants in Korea make, I would allow a little more fermentation time.

Even more important is personal taste. How strong a flavor do you like in your kimchee?

What you may want to do is take the bulk of it and move it to the warmest part of your refrigerator in about 2-3 days, but separate out a small portion to leave out to strengthen further. That is then ideal to use for making kimchee jjigae, which requires a much stronger kimchee -- basically the equivalent of the kimchee left in late winter before spring arrives and the gentle fresh spring kimchees can be made from newly arrived ingredients.

When Koreans don't have old kimchee around, they will normally give what is in the refrigerator 3-5 days on the counter to strengthen before using it for jjigae.

Again, though, it really comes down to your personal preference and how you have seasoned your yangnyeom.

Good luck,

Jim
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Tokyo, Japan

Never teach a pig to sing. It only wastes your time and frustrates the pig.

#69 torakris

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 05:29 PM

Jim made a lot of good points, it is usually to taste and a lot depends on what you have put in. I generally leave mine out for about 4 to 5 days at just about the same temp.

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#70 jschyun

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Posted 05 January 2004 - 11:59 PM

my favorite kimchi is Bossam Kimchi- cabbage, octopus, chesnut, pine nut, date, other good things all wraped in a big cabbage.

I love bosam kimchi, but i'm too lazy to make it. If you're in the L.A. area, you can go to YongSusan for it. I think it's the only branch they have outside Korea.
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#71 rslee

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 12:14 AM

Hi all. Fairly new here. Such a cool site. I have a suggestion on bo sam...a little place called Go Ba Woo on the northeast corner of Vermont and 7th Street in a small mall. I haven't been there in a while, but it was very good. Most of the places that do this really well, IMHO, are places where drinks (alcohol) are readily available.

Robert

#72 torakris

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 01:08 AM

Robert
welcome to egullet!
Hope to hear more from you. :biggrin:

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#73 jschyun

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 01:16 AM

Welcome Robert!
I also say hope to hear more from you! Need more L.A. Koreans on this site.

Where are the best drinking places in your opinion? (Maybe this should be on California forum)
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#74 rslee

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Posted 06 January 2004 - 05:15 PM

Thank you all. Ever since I started cooking professionally, I haven't had the time to go out and find places to drink. Most of the evenings I get off, I try to get out to different eateries as much as possible. But from memory, good places would be Ju Mak 74 which is on Vermont between 7th and Wilshire. There is also a place which is very "old school" Korean. If you want food they used to eat in Korean bars, with the ambience as well, you should go to a place called Dang Sun Sah (sp) on 6th Street and New Hampshire. All very authentic places with all types of Korean drinks and anju (different types of food usually eaten with alcohol). Koreans and Asians in general, I think, like to eat something when we drink. Both places had great bo sam as well (I had to include it to stay within the topic of this forum). :biggrin:

#75 torakris

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 08:43 PM

Only in Japan?

Posted Image

kimchi umeboshi

It was actually quite good. :biggrin:

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#76 Pan

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 09:07 PM

I'm not suprised that it was good. It looks very good!

#77 Laksa

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 06:42 AM

kimchi umeboshi

I'm curious. That doesn't look anything like the traditional kimchi. What's in it? And why is it called kimchi? :huh:

#78 torakris

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Posted 25 June 2004 - 05:42 PM

kimchi umeboshi

I'm curious. That doesn't look anything like the traditional kimchi. What's in it? And why is it called kimchi? :huh:

it lists the ingredients as (besides the umeboshi):

chiles (I am assuming powder though it doesn't specify), garlic, ginger, ami no shiokara (tiny brined shrimp?), iwashi no shiokara (fermented sardines?) nira (garlic chives), sugar and sesame, preservatives.

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#79 torakris

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 09:43 PM

It has been a really long time, but yesterday I made kimchi :biggrin:

Posted Image

now I just have to wait......

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#80 Pan

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 01:12 AM

That looks good!

#81 jschyun

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Posted 05 January 2005 - 09:13 PM

How long are you going to ferment this particular batch?

Speaking of which, almost time for me to make kimchi as well.
I love cold Dinty Moore beef stew. It is like dog food! And I am like a dog.
--NeroW

#82 torakris

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Posted 06 January 2005 - 12:40 AM

How long are you going to ferment this particular batch?

Speaking of which, almost time for me to make kimchi as well.

View Post


I haven't decided yet... :biggrin:
The recipe I loosely followed said to leave it out overnight and then refrigerate it. I left it out for two days and it is now refrigerated. I will taste it periodically...

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#83 chefzadi

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Posted 12 January 2005 - 05:34 PM

What's your favorite kimchi?

What is one of the most unusual ones you have eaten?


Check out this site for some less common examples:

http://www.kimchi.or...kind/index.html

View Post


My favorite kimchi is napa cabbage kimchi with rice and kalbi (or sauteed sausages). Does it get better than this? The most unusual kimchi I've tried? It wasn't a kimchi, it falls unde the jeot category. Fermented cuttle fish, seasoned with garlic, ground red pepper, garlic. A drop or two of sesame oil before service. Delicious!
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#84 yushoe

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Posted 24 April 2005 - 08:36 PM

how did the kimchi's turn out?

#85 Soup

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Posted 25 April 2005 - 05:21 PM

Last time I was in korea, my wife and I went to the Kimchi museum in Seoul. Near the financial district (i think). Lots and Lots of plastic formed to make it look like kimchi.

Not sure if I have a favorite but my top five goes like this (not in any order).

Chongack kimchi (small radish with the greens attached).
Mul Kimchi or Tongchimi
Oyee Kimchi (cucumber)
Gul Kimchi (napa cabbage kimchi preserved with salted oysters)
Tong Kimchi (Large raddish cut into big sections).

#86 chefzadi

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Posted 17 July 2005 - 03:11 AM

OKay, so a friend of mine's wife told me she likes to eat kimchi with Indian meat curries. I had a hard time wrapping my mind around it. It seemed so odd. Then I tried some Bengali karahi beef. The spicing reminded me of some North African beef stews.

The other day we made beef with quince. We rarely make sweet tagines, but the quince looked good and the beef was on sale. And the dish isn't really sweet anyway and we spiced it with turmeric and saffron. We had couscous on hand, but I thought it would be better with rice. Basmatic rice with butter and saffron is one of my favorite foods. As I was sitting down to eat, I had a mad craving to have kimchi with the meal. It was delicious.

I think this is the first time in my life I've had a meal that combined elements from different cultures (aside from an Algerian-French meal). Yes, I am that set in my ways when it comes to eating. I don't like to mix stuff up. We don't do fusion at home. But it worked. It was really really good.
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#87 sazji

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 06:22 AM

The general stereotype of Japanese kimuchi in Korea is that it has sugar
in it (!) and lacks both garlic and chili. 

View Post


Horrors! What would be the point? ;)

Actually in surfing the internet I've found many, many Korean recipes for kimchi that include some sugar. I've never used it when I make my own though.

As for my favorites, napa cabbage and cubed radish top the list. I put some watercress in my last batch of radish kimchi, and also green garlic as it's just started to appear on the market, and it was very good. Here's a picture. My kitchen is unheated so in winter I just leave it on the counter till it's done.

<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i17.photobuck...zji/kimchi.jpg" border="0" alt="Image hosting by Photobucket"></a>

By the way, I learned that a large number of the Koreans who fled to the Soviet Union after the Korean War were settled in Uzbekistan, and now kimchi has become a staple there among Uzbeks as well!

I can't handle the squid one. To me it tastes sort of like a marine aquarium in need of cleaning smells. But my Korean friend Yujin was horrified that I didn't like it, and exclaimed "You don't like that one? But that's the best one!" I think she gave up hope on me then... Oh well, more for her! ;)

If it can be made from crabs, is it ever made from shrimp?

Edited by sazji, 12 February 2006 - 06:33 AM.

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#88 nakji

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 08:06 AM

Some of my favourite "fusion" recipes for kimchi are here

What happens when foreigners get their hands on kimchi and incorporate it into their native cuisines, based entirely on western ingredients that can be found in an average "Mart" in Gangneung, Korea? My favourites are Kimchi Ham bokkum sandwichi and Kimchi Garlic Sludge.

Warning: Language

#89 jeniac42

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 02:59 PM

Since I can't seem to find a kimchi recipe on RecipeGullet, would anyone mind sharing theirs? I've found various confusing and conflicting recipes online, which is to be expected, but I'd like just some basic beginner's version. I will confess that I don't like my kimchi to be too fishy; I think I'll have to work up to that.
Jennie

#90 chefzadi

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Posted 12 February 2006 - 03:06 PM

Kimchi recipe and a few others

You won't find another source online or in English who knows as much about Korean culture and cuisine :wink:
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