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Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 1)


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#31 bripastryguy

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 07:18 AM

elyse,

had no choice, wanted the strongest flavors to come through.
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
Brian Fishman

#32 bripastryguy

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 07:20 AM

Thanks everybody for all your input

It helped me out alot
"Chocolate has no calories....
Chocolate is food for the soul, The soul has no weight, therefore no calories" so said a customer, a lovely southern woman, after consuming chocolate indulgence
SWEET KARMA DESSERTS
www.sweetkarmadesserts.com
550 East Meadow Ave. East meadow, NY 11554
516-794-4478
Brian Fishman

#33 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 03:06 PM

I haven't made these before. The recipes I've found and plan to use, use oils to flavor (so your not thinning it down with liquids) but I don't have any on hand. So my brain is dead and I need help thinking of a flavor that kids would like with common flavoring ingredients a typical kitchen has.

Any ideas?

#34 nightscotsman

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 06:07 PM

Check out this recipe I posted a while ago for Strawberry Marshmallows. It uses fruit puree instead of flavoring oils so the flavor is very natural and fresh. You could try substituting other fruits like raspberry, peach or even pumkin and some spices. I made a cinnamon version a few weeks ago (replace puree with water and add powdered cinnamon) that was great in hot cider. The variations are endless. :smile:

#35 Cusina

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 06:38 PM

Wow, those look great.

Have you noticed that whole foods carries homemade style marshmellows at about $6 per 2 dozen? Crazy expensive. They coat theirs with coconut, which is tasty.

Edited by Cusina, 23 November 2003 - 06:41 PM.

What's wrong with peanut butter and mustard? What else is a guy supposed to do when we are out of jelly?

-Dad

#36 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 07:25 PM

Ah, I didn't realize that was your recipe, in fact I did print it out a while ago. I thought it was from finecookings site......

Anyway, I've never made marshmellows before and your recipe doesn't contain egg whites (and has alot of liquid) which concerned me. It doesn't make sense (in my head thinking it thru)....your pouring hot syrup into a thin non airating liquid, why? I understand the gelatin is setting the whipped texture, but I'm getting jello in my head not marshmellows. Would you please explain how your recipe works in comparision to a typical m. recipe?

#37 nightscotsman

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Posted 23 November 2003 - 10:05 PM

The main difference between "my" recipe (actually based on one from Martha) and most of the others I've seen is the lack of egg whites and a higher proportion of corn syrup or glucose. What is actually whipping is the glucose cooked to the soft ball stage, so there's not much water left in the syrup. The water in the bowl is absorbed by the gelatine so it not only sets as it cools, it's keeping the cooked syrup from softening. But then again, I'm most just guessing about the science :unsure: .

Anyway, I hope you'll give it a try - I guarantee it works and makes a very stable, but light and creamy marshmallow. If you want a firmer finished product for some reason, you could always increase the gelatine.

#38 mckayinutah

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Posted 24 November 2003 - 07:26 AM

Wendy,

I made marshmallows for the first time about a month ago for a cooking class. Was very surprised to see that it was actually a cooked sugar syrup not egg whites.
I found the recipe in the " Ultimate candy book" by I believe Weinstein. He also has a book on ultimate ice cream, if that sounds more familiar. His recipe is for plain marshmallows, but also includes some variations, like toasted coconut.

Haven't ever made marshmallows before, I found the recipe to be very easily done. It is just soaked gelatin, put in a mixing bowl, then the hot sugar syrup is pourd into ( like making Italian meringue ) while the machine is mixing. It goes for about 10 minutes, then is done. Looks like meringue. Let set 10 hours or overnight, then cut. If you want, I can give you the recipe. Just let me know ( these marshmallows are firmer than store bought, but I did get a few marriage proposals from the ladies at the cooking class after they tasted them :laugh:)

Take care,

Jason

#39 tryska

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Posted 24 November 2003 - 08:13 AM

citrus is your friend.

#40 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 24 November 2003 - 09:31 AM

O.k.
Thank-you guys, you've helped me understand more about this topic. I'm no longer worrried about trying your recipe nightscotsman, thank you for clearing up the details. If they've got SB on hand I'll make them.

#41 Skwerl

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Posted 10 December 2003 - 02:44 PM

Is there an additive you guys can suggest to give marshmallows a more rich flavor? The recipe I use only uses glucose, sugar, and egg whites. Is there soomething (besides vanilla) that you have added to give the marshmallow a more decadent flavor?

Thanks,
Josh
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#42 tryska

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Posted 10 December 2003 - 02:45 PM

doh - scratch that.

do you mean flavoring, or additive?

if an additive wouldn't it screw up the chemistry of a marshmallow?

if flavoring, lime, lemon, orange, strawberry?

Edited by tryska, 10 December 2003 - 02:46 PM.


#43 Skwerl

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Posted 10 December 2003 - 04:03 PM

I'm not sure if it would screw it up or not. I don't mind making it a bit more dense at all, I'd just like to make it taste a bit better. The end result will be enrobed in couverture or will be a filling. I like the texture of marshmallow, but I am a bit dissatisfied with the flavor. I'm just trying to find something to enrich the final result. As for flavorings, I have tried kirsch which was okay, and orange flower water, which made the marshmallow taste like detergent. *cough*

Josh
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#44 bilrus

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Posted 10 December 2003 - 04:06 PM

At our recent DC area eGullet dinner at 2941 we were served Strawberry Marshmallows - interesting change of pace.
Bill Russell

#45 KAPDADDY

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Posted 10 December 2003 - 08:40 PM

I find fruity marshmallows a little odd. IMO, the best marshmallows have a pure, clean flavor. Even a little fruit flavoring tends to be too dominant in marshmallows.
Have you tried replacing some of the sugar with a small amount of honey?

#46 nightscotsman

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 08:33 AM

You can use any natural flavor extracts and they shouldn't change the final texture. Try coconut or coffee extracts for a richer flavor, or replace the water in the recipe with some strongly brewed chai. I made cinnamon marshmallows by just adding about a teaspoon of ceylon cinnamon and they were great with hot cider.

As for fruit flavored marshmallows, I hope you'll consider making the strawberry version I added to the recipe archive. They have a very creamy mouth-feel and bright strawberry flavor.

#47 Comfort Me

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 08:43 AM

I use a quality Almond Extract. If dipping, I then use almond as a garnish.

I also have used half vanilla and half almond, which is a nice, round flavor. The chemistry of Marshmallow really limits you on what you can do, and since I'm afraid I am science-impaired, I haven't tried anything more exciting.

The almond and the almond/vanilla are both excellent in hot cocoa -- something that is on my mind today, with the 5-degree wind chill!
Aidan

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#48 m(a)ce

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 08:02 AM

I just had an Anise flavored marshmallow at a friends house; we just happened to bring a thick hot chocolate to float them in.

Anyone have a good lead on a easier way to slice marshmallows for a retail setting?

#49 cbarre02

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 09:24 AM

Any one of the warm spices (clove, nutmeg, mace, cardamom, etc...) should lend a nice depth of flavor to a marshmallow. You could also try adding a touch of salt to the recipe, to pronounce added flavors more. Making it taste like something more than just sugar. Vanilla bean may also give a bit more depth than just extract.
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#50 Louisa Chu

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 10:08 AM

We use a guitar slicer - with film - for our small scale marshmallow production. Better flavour - we do just a classic marshmallow and a strawberry one - both very good - both coated in just powdered sugar - but I want to try playing with the coating - using the tant pour tant - half powdered sugar/half powdered almonds - etc. - and yeah, definitely spices too - and cocoa powder, etc.

Edited by loufood, 13 December 2003 - 10:08 AM.


#51 stscam

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 10:35 AM

We use a guitar slicer - with film - for our small scale marshmallow production.


I'm curious what film you use and why. I've seen references to "guitar paper" but no one seemed to know exactly what it was.

I'm "guitar-challenged." When I make pate de fruit I sugar the uncut sheets before laying them on the guitar base, so they don't stick. The first cut goes pretty easily, but the second cut, with a 90 degree turn, can get very messy. Is there a better way?

Steven
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#52 ruthcooks

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 10:41 AM

I'm thinking of how yummy the marshmallows look while you're melting them in butter to make rice krispy treats. What would happen if you folded melted butter--or even better, browned butter--into the finished marshmallow recipe?
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#53 nightscotsman

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 11:01 AM

I'm thinking of how yummy the marshmallows look while you're melting them in butter to make rice krispy treats. What would happen if you folded melted butter--or even better, browned butter--into the finished marshmallow recipe?

I agree that the flavor of butter would be nice in a marshmallow, but I suspect the fat would just deflate the foam and you would end up with something heavy and chewy like a nougat. Not that there's anything wrong with that. :wink:

#54 Louisa Chu

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 11:11 AM

We use a guitar slicer - with film - for our small scale marshmallow production.


I'm curious what film you use and why. I've seen references to "guitar paper" but no one seemed to know exactly what it was.

The film in French is called papier guitar - a heavier duty sheet of clear plastic film - I'm guessing it's the same since it's a literal translation - but plastic not paper. It's used to prevent sticking and to make cleaner cuts. It would definitely help in slicing the pate de fruit. Otherwise there are pate de fruit cutters - that look like those old ice cube trays in a way - you pour the pate de fruit hot liquid into the base - metal mold, lightly greased sulphurised paper, greased side down - cool/set - then press the cutter in - pull out for pate de fruit squares - but only good for really limited amounts - really difficult to clean.

#55 Betts

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Posted 16 December 2003 - 08:08 PM

After reading e gullet marshmallow experiences I made some last week and was very happy with the result. I cut some as stars for a sweet tray and cubed the rest. After a few days, I tossed the remaining ones with a conf sugar/ Dutch cocoa/ cinnamon mixture and the taste was rich and complex. The only downside was that they looked like cubes of browned beef. A light sprinkle of pwd sugar was needed.

What about rose flower water for a flavoring?

#56 nightscotsman

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Posted 17 December 2003 - 07:54 AM

rose flower water could be very nice. Just be sure not to overdo the flavoring or - like orange flower water or lavender - it can turn out tasting like soap.

Which recipe did you end up using? Was it an egg white or non-egg white version?

#57 Betts

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Posted 17 December 2003 - 10:31 AM

I used the egg white version but was so tempted to do your strawberry ones. Customers are sooo amazed at how fresh and tasty house made marshmallows are.

#58 Skwerl

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Posted 17 December 2003 - 10:03 PM

Fresh and tasty, eh? Mine were fresh, but not very tasty. I tried flavoring some with orange flower water, and they DID taste just like detergent. Cheers, Nightscotsman! :) Betts, would you mind posting your recipe here in the forum? I used Friberg's and just found it a little bland. Thanks in advance!

Josh Usovsky
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#59 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 24 December 2003 - 09:03 AM

An update.

I made the recipe from J.Torres book using egg whites. They were not a perfect true white color as the photos show. I let them set in the full sheet pan and then cut them to shape two days later. The top portion which was exposed to air and the xxxsugar/cornstarch was too crisp (I thought) and then the freshly coated other sides should have been left to air dry before stacking them for serving.

I added vanilla beans in addition to extract to flavor... and these were pretty good tasting. But I suppose to get a true white you can't use egg whites and natural colored vanilla (Liquid)?

Next time I will definately try the strawberry ones from you Nightscotsman!!

#60 alanamoana

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Posted 24 December 2003 - 09:16 AM

just as a quick aside, most marshmallows don't use egg whites. i'm sure that's how they started out (as meringues), but it seems that the more stable ones are gelatin/sugar mixes.

we'll have to ask one of the more scientific egulleteers to research the process for us!