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Furikake


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#1 Akiko

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 09:05 AM

We seem to keep coming back to Furikake.. and its been said that Furikake deserves its own thread, so here it is.

Furikake is "seasoning" that is created to sprinkle on rice.. to make a kind of "flavoured" rice.

It comes in different forms... salmon sprinkles with nori and sesame, dried fish egg (tobiko) and nori, dried egg and nori, wasabi flavoured, shiso flavoured, what are those fish shaving things called? flavoured.. and many others.

I love this on my rice... I also love the plain nori and sesame mix with butter on my rice.

But just as good as a snack is microwave very buttery popcorn with furikake on it... you can also mix in some rice crackers.

What are your favorite furikake flavors? What do you put it on?

Akiko

#2 torakris

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 03:46 PM

I actually don't care for furikake and never use it myself but my children and husband love it.
I probably have a bout 6 or 7 kinds in the house right now because I use them to make different rice balls (onigiri) for my husband's breakfast.

A year or so ago I had found this wonderful furikake called yaki-miso (grilled miso) and it was flavored with shiso as well, I would eat this for lunch almost every day, but I can't find it anymore.

I am amazed at the interesting uses people have for furikake as I read through e-gullet.
In Japan there are probably as many furikake types as there are cereal types in the US, what are the most common ones that people can find outside of Japan?

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#3 Suzanne F

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 03:58 PM

OH NO!! Not another condiment to jam into my cupboard! :shock: :shock: That stuff sounds great -- gotta get me some, especially since I can be happy with a big bowl of rice.

#4 coastcat

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 04:54 PM

Mmmmm, furikake. I like any version with shaved bonito, although anything with fish roe is also a delight.

Here's my favorite breakfast during childhood: Mix a raw egg into hot rice, add a splash of soy sauce and a sprinkle of Aji-No-Moto (a.k.a. MSG), and shake furikake on top until my mother scolded me to stop. :smile:

shouldn't there be a drool smilie?

#5 Jason Perlow

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 04:56 PM

Furikake is great stuff. I shake it on plain sushi (Nishiki) rice.
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#6 torakris

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 05:11 PM

Just pulled out my furikake stockpile, we have:


gomashio

kongari shoyuaji okaka (grilled soy flavored kastuo or bonito flakes)

karashi mentai (hot mustard and spicy cod roe)

ajidouraku (this is one of the popular mixes with sesame, katsuo flakes, eggs and seaweed)

shiso wakame (shiso, wakame and umeboshi)

tarako (cod roe)

sake wakame ( salmon flakes and wakame)

noritamago (my kid's favorite-- egg and seaweed)



Anyone else out there learn the "proper" way to shake the furikake onto your rice?
My husband taught this to my children, you hold the furikake packet (or jar) in one hand over the rice and gently tap the wrist with your other hand.

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#7 Jinmyo

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Posted 10 February 2003 - 06:56 PM

Anyone else out there learn the "proper" way to shake the furikake onto your rice?
My husband taught this to my children, you hold the furikake packet (or jar) in one hand over the rice and gently tap the wrist  with your other hand.

That's so.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

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#8 Akiko

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 02:33 AM

That's hysterical (about the proper way to sprinkle furikake)... have you ever seen Tampopo? It remiinds me of the scene where they are having dining etiquette class (the table of women dressed oh so properly eating spaghetti?). Funny.

My mother never taught us anything like that... and I am happy if I've managed to keep the jar away from my niece, whose ultimate goal at a meal will be to pour the entire jar out on her dish and eat just that.

#9 Jinmyo

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 05:08 AM

The whole ramen ritual that opens Tampopo is even funnier.

I love that movie and was just talking to someone yesterday about watching it again.
"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

#10 torakris

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Posted 11 February 2003 - 02:51 PM

The whole ramen ritual that opens Tampopo is even funnier.

I love that movie and was just talking to someone yesterday about watching it again.

I haven't seen Tampopo in years, hilarious movie.
Definitely time to see it again!

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#11 torakris

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 03:36 PM

Has anyone ever used furikake as an ingredient in a marinade?
I can't find it now but I ran across 2 recipes a couple days ago (in either a Thai or Chinese cookbook) that called for furikake as a marinade ingredient.

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#12 smallworld

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 07:11 PM

I used to be totally addicted to furikake, until I read the ingredient label. There's so much junk in there! Ugh.
We still keep about one pack (either tarako or ajidouraku) and use it very occasionally, but it's not something I want to eat regularly. Which is good, since I'm trying to cut down on the amount of rice I eat, and with furikake I can easily eat two or three bowls!
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#13 SobaAddict70

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Posted 12 March 2003 - 07:12 PM

You know, I'm gonna have to get this into my pantry now.

Bad Kristin!!! :blink: Behold, my new addiction. This, from someone who used to snack on cold rice, sprinkled with a little soy and sesame oil when he was a kid.

Soba

#14 Akiko

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 10:55 AM

I do use furikake as a marinade... but for sashimi, its a common ingredient in Poke (hawaiian sashimi salad kind of thing).

Yummy a little maguro or salmon chopped into bite size pieces, some seaweed salad, a little soy sauce, sesame oil, red chilis (if you like spicy), green onions, and some furikake. Very good with rice.

#15 tissue

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 11:27 AM

I like furikake on chilled tofu.
Refreshing...

#16 margaret

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 03:26 PM

I used to be totally addicted to furikake, until I read the ingredient label. There's so much junk in there! Ugh.

Is there really so much bad stuff in furikake? Maybe it depends on the brand, but the two I have at home right now (noritama and some random yasai) don't have much outside of the main ingredients.

noritama- sesame seed, yolk, sugar, salt, shaved bonito, seaweed
yasai - sesame seed, carrot, spinach, pumpkin, celery, japanese mustard plant, sugar, salt, seaweed

kind of surprised not to find the ubiquitous aji no moto.

I eat a lot of this stuff, and this talk about junk in there concerns me.

Furikake on tofu - interesting idea. I'd imagine the contrast between smooth and crunchy, mild and salty, to be interesting. Do you add soy sauce, scallions, etc?

#17 torakris

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 03:37 PM

I just pulled out my noritama pack and read the label, wow!
27 ingredients (and that is counting all of the various fish and meat extracts as one!)

I don't even know what some of those Japnese ingredients are, of course I probably wouldn't be familiar with the English equivalent either.

Oh I love poke! need to make it again soon!
I always avoided putting the furikake on it because I don't really care for it.

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#18 tissue

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Posted 13 March 2003 - 03:48 PM

I add soy sauce depending on what type of furikake I'm using. I always add a little bit of scallions for flavor, or a little grated young ginger.

You are right. I like the contrast in texture which is why I love the sesame seeds play against the softness of the tofu.

#19 smallworld

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 08:11 PM

Margaret,

My furikake doesn't list MSG, but it does list extract of kelp, which is natually high in MSG. It lists lots of other stuff like flavourings, colourings, fragrance, preservatives, oil, sweetners, eggshell, destrin, salt, flour, and many more. Like Torakris, I can't understand most of it, and I'm not saying that all of the ingredients are necessarily bad. I just prefer simpler, fresher and more natural things to go on my rice.
Except for when I really want the crunch that only furikake delivers- a few occasional sprinkles can't hurt!

Those labels of yours that only list a few main ingredients sound really suspicious. I remember when I was in Canada comparing the pasted-on English label the original Japanese label, and boy did they leave lots of stuff out! I don't know if this was just laziness on the part of the manufacturer or importer (it must be hard to translate all that stuff) or deliberate sneakiness. I suspect the latter.
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#20 torakris

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Posted 15 March 2003 - 08:29 PM

I think from now on I will stick with Jin's goma-shio mix! :biggrin:

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#21 margaret

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Posted 17 March 2003 - 11:37 AM

I know what you mean about the Japanese labels. I always wondered why they can't get someone to translate them in full - although maybe you're right, perhaps certain ingredients are being left out for import reasons.
Very frustrating to me, though, since I don't eat meat and they always stick the English labels over the Japanese ingredient list - and niku ekisu seems to show up in everything from salad dressing to yakisoba sauce. Now I just don't buy the prepackaged stuff.
On a totally unrelated note, though, apparently it's now illegal to import Japanese beef products into the U.S. (mad cow reasons) and they've taken all the meat derivatives out of the curry roux and other mixes. Or so they claim.

#22 torakris

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Posted 17 March 2003 - 03:54 PM

Right after the BSE scare here a lot of curry roux, furikake, yakisoba packets etc had labels saying no beef products used. Some Japanese stopped buying the products as well.
Just checked my box of curry roux I picked up last week it still says on the front that no beef products are used

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#23 jrufusj

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Posted 21 September 2003 - 05:07 AM

New use for furikake:

We've been eating up leftovers this weekend. Last night that meant cleaning the last scraps from the carcass of a chicken Cathryn had roasted earlier in the week and making a chicken salad. We didn't have enough for a plated salad, so we made sandwiches with some good whole grain bread we picked up from the little German deli outside the expat food market.

We had a few potatoes that also needed to be eaten so -- as a rare treat -- I made potato chips (crisps). We almost never buy that kind of packaged crap, so we only eat them when I make them. Well, with potatoes that needed to be eaten and a dinner of sandwiches, it seemed time for the splurge.

Got out the Japanese mandoline, sliced them paper thin, fried them in batches in pretty hot soy oil until they quit giving off moisture, drained them, filled a paper sack with paper towel shreds, dumped the chips in, shook them to get rid of the rest of the excess oil, shook in a little salt, SAW THE WASABI FURIKAKE BOTTLE. That did it; in went a healthy dose and shake, shake went the bag. Out came a chip. Taste...damn good.

I probably don't make potato crisps more than four or five times a year, but I made another batch tonight. Guess what flavor they were.

His bloatedness,

Jim

Edited: To add the fact that it was my wife who spotted the furikake and suggested using it. She is responsible for the fact that I ate potato chips two nights in a row!

Edited by jrufusj, 22 September 2003 - 02:28 AM.

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#24 NVNVGirl

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Posted 21 September 2003 - 08:00 AM

I do use furikake as a marinade... but for sashimi, its a common ingredient in Poke (hawaiian sashimi salad kind of thing).

Yummy a little maguro or salmon chopped into bite size pieces, some seaweed salad, a little soy sauce, sesame oil, red chilis (if you like spicy), green onions, and some furikake.  Very good with rice.

I had no idea there were different kinds of furikake! I discovered it when I was in Hawaii, and brought a couple of jars home with me. I love it, even tho I'm sure it's got a lot of salt in it, and I LOVE LOVE LOVE poke! Cannot wait to get back to Hawaii next month! Well, I guess this time I"m going to have to look for other types of furikake to bring home again! Most people bring back shells and leis....I bring back condiments :biggrin:

#25 FoodZealot

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Posted 21 September 2003 - 01:19 PM

I like furikake occasionally. Putting it on tofu sounds great, tissue.

This may seem a bit odd, but in Hawaii, people would sneak furikake into movie theaters to put on their popcorn - often with "butter topping" already on it. I believe it is now available from the concession stand like this in some places. Arare (rice crackers), norimaki and other items have always been available as snacks at theater, so people also concoct their own custom popcorn. Sometimes including li hing mui, M&M's, gummi worms, etc.

Another big craze in Hawaii (or seemed to be when I was there last year) is coating salmon with furikake, roasting it and serving it with wasabi mayo.

~Tad

#26 ankomochi

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Posted 22 September 2003 - 11:54 AM

I love shiso furikake! I make shiso spaghetti using shiso furikake. I cook pasta, and mix with butter and shiso furikake. It's so easy and pretty tasty. If I want more flavor, I put the pieces of umeboshi to enhance the flavor.

Occasionally I get hive eating furikake gohan. I think something in furikake is making me getting an allergic reaction.
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#27 skchai

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Posted 24 September 2003 - 04:50 PM

Furikake goes with just about any relatively dry (and a few wet), savory, salty snack. Here's some other creative (?) uses I've come across or tried myself:

Setofumi (Goma-Katsuo) Furikake in Chicken or Tonkatsu Breading

Shiso Furikake on Cole Slaw

Sake Tarako Furikake on Boiled, Fried, or Roasted Peanuts

Any-kine assortments on Popcorn (different bowls for each, at parties)

Katsuo Mirin on Green Mango (tastes better than it sounds)

Norikomi (Nori and Goma) + Shiso on Bombay / Chaat Mix - this is good!

Ah. . . that's it

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#28 Comfort Me

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Posted 11 December 2003 - 08:01 AM

Last night I was eating alone, so I made a quick salad with ginger dressing, some steamed carrots, and an omelette. As I was wisking the eggs, my eyes lit on my jar of Furikake. So, on a whim, I poured the eggs into the skillet, the sprinkled on a liberal dose of Furikake. MOST yummy.

I just recently found Furikake, and reading all the varieties made my mouth water. I love dashi, so I'm going to look for Furikake with bonito. My wife will love the salmon flake. I'll just have to hunt around Chicago looking for more varieties!

Tomorrow I'm going to have rice, egg, and Furikake for breakfast. I'm drolling just thinking about it!
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#29 jrufusj

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 10:14 AM

Last night I was eating alone, so I made a quick salad with ginger dressing, some steamed carrots, and an omelette. As I was wisking the eggs, my eyes lit on my jar of Furikake. So, on a whim, I poured the eggs into the skillet, the sprinkled on a liberal dose of Furikake. MOST yummy.

I just recently found Furikake, and reading all the varieties made my mouth water. I love dashi, so I'm going to look for Furikake with bonito. My wife will love the salmon flake. I'll just have to hunt around Chicago looking for more varieties!

Tomorrow I'm going to have rice, egg, and Furikake for breakfast. I'm drolling just thinking about it!

Have fun. There are a ton of flavors to try. The four on my shelf right now are wasabi, mentaiko, katsuobushi, and salmon. The order I've listed them probably also matches my order of preference.

What do you pay for it in Chicago? I normally bring it back from Japan to Seoul. In Seoul a bottle half the size costs twice as much as the bigger one in Tokyo.

Jim
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#30 hillvalley

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Posted 13 December 2003 - 12:17 PM

My roomate my freshman year of college was Korean and introduced me to furikake. I have been addicted ever since. I keep a jar of seaweed furikake in my classroom to throw on top of rice for lunch. This year my students love the stuff and I have started using it as a reward (they are mainly inner city kids most of whom have never seen an ocean, let alone seaweed). I have one kid who like to eat it plain, and would "drink" the stuff if I let him.

Edited by hillvalley, 13 December 2003 - 12:18 PM.

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