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Mochi

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#61 torakris

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 01:01 AM

my kids were begging for mochi today so I boiled up some maru mochi (round ones) and covered them with kinako and sugar mixture. We had seconds.....

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#62 Hiroyuki

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Posted 03 January 2005 - 04:54 AM

Also, we were told by MIL's friend that everything in the ozoni (including the mochi) was supposed to be round (for good luck or harmony).  What do you think?

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I googled to find that the friend's statement is true of some households especially those in the Kansai area. I also learned that maru-mochi are formal while kaku-mochi are semiformal.

What are some other traditional times for pounding mochi besides New Years? ... How does Girl's Day (March 3) or Boy's Day (May 5) sound?

That sounds fine. According to one source, mochi pounding is practiced on events such as o-higan (equinoctial week), gods festivals, housewarming, and sekku (seasonal festivals). Sekku include Girls' Day and Boys' Day.

#63 shinju

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 01:20 PM

We also make mochi at our Buddhist Church and regarding your question as to why kinako mochi got sweaty - did you use _ample_ cornstarch when shaping mochi? After shaping with cornstarch then add kinako. Fresh mochi absorbs quite a bit of cornstarch, but do not taste like cornstarch.

#64 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 04 January 2005 - 02:17 PM

We also make mochi at our Buddhist Church and regarding your question as to why kinako mochi got sweaty - did you use _ample_ cornstarch when shaping mochi?  After shaping with cornstarch then add kinako.  Fresh mochi absorbs quite a bit of cornstarch, but do not taste like cornstarch.

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We used katakuriko (potato starch) to kind of roll it in first, but I tried not to use too much or my kinako wouldn't stick to it.
Maybe I need to use more and then "drown" my mochi in kinako? I will try using more next time and see how it comes out.
Thanks for the tip.

#65 Hiroyuki

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Posted 28 January 2005 - 08:58 PM

How do you keep mochi from becoming moldy?

This morning, I found the remaining mochi, carelessly left in the original plastic bag under the sink at room temperature, were moldy. The mochi contained citric acid, and I had assumed that they wouldn't get moldy. Fortunately, they just started to gather mold, so I scraped off the moldy portions with a knife.

In 1960s, when I was small, my mother still used the traditional method of storing mochi - keeping them in water. Such mochi are called mizu mochi (lit. water mochi). They get moldy sooner or later even if stored that way.

Note that mizu mochi can mean a completely different thing:
http://www.tenkoudou...om/mizumoti.htm

#66 therese

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 05:30 PM

Spent Saturday afternoon running a bit amok at a local Japanese grocery, and picked up an item that looked interesting, kirimochi (as per the not particularly informative added-on English label).

The individually wrapped items are firm (very firm) slightly off-white blocks that measure about 10 x 3 x 1 cm. A picture of the package may be seen here if you click on the third button from the left (it's the package in the middle). Clicking on that package brings up an little chef (tossing something in an iron skillet), and clicking on the chef brings up all sorts of interesting preps.

So, what's the general idea here? Do I need to rehydrate the blocks in some way? Or does one leap directly to the saute/broil/fry step?

The back of the package shows both an oven (conventional? microwave) and a liquid-filled saucepan, presumably alternative methods of cooking.

Any and all suggestions helpful.
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#67 helenjp

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 05:33 PM

In deep deadline panic here, so just one tip...

My boys' favorite way to eat them is to grill them with cheese sprinkled on top. They're done when they puff up. Moderate rather than really hot grill.

#68 therese

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 05:48 PM

In deep deadline panic here, so just one tip...

My boys' favorite way to eat them is to grill them with cheese sprinkled on top. They're done when they puff up. Moderate rather than really hot grill.

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Cool. So no hydration step required beforehand, just heat and eat?

I'm most definitely not on deadline here, so no hurry with follow-up, but what sort of cheese? And are they pretty much palatable only when hot? Or is the cooled version (that I might pack in my lunch tomorrow, for instance) still edible?
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#69 helenjp

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 07:55 PM

Therese, any kind of cheese will do.

There are three common ways of cooking those square mochi:

Grill - no need to use water etc etc

Microwave - don't cover, or they won't be able to expand. You can use a free-standing plastic cover if you want, though. US microwaves normally more powerful than in Japan, so it's hard to say how long - too long and they melt into pools of starch :shock: . Try 2 minutes???

Drop into boiling water until they are soft and rubbery - they won't puff up and be crunchy this way, just soft and chewy. When done, pull out one by one and either drop in cold water till you want them, or drop straight into preferred seasonings...soy sauce/butter; kinako (brown toasted soybean powder) and sugar; ground toasted sesame seeds and sugar or salt, straight soy sauce etc.

#70 Hiroyuki

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 08:52 PM

First of all, Sato's Kirimochi is one of the high-quality mochi products available in Japan. Some lower-quality mochi products contain starch, are less sticky, and are somewhat translucent.

Mochi is usually served hot. It turns hard when cool, requiring you to reheat it.

If you want to know the details of any of the dishes shown on the page you mentioned, please let me know.

Here is a brief description of the dishes shown on the page:

1. Deep-fried wonton mochi

2. Okonomiyaki with mochi

3. Izobe (nori) mochi with butter

4. Porridge with mochi

5. Nori-wrapped, deep-fried mochi

6. Mochi pizza

7. Ramen with mochi

8. Diced and deep-fried mochi

#71 Hiroyuki

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 08:58 PM

Microwave - don't cover, or they won't be able to expand. You can use a free-standing plastic cover if you want, though. US microwaves normally more powerful than in Japan, so it's hard to say how long - too long and they melt into pools of starch :shock: . Try 2 minutes???

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I usually put one or two kirimochi in a dish, add a small amount of hot water, cover with plastic wrap, and heat it in the microwave for 40 seconds or so.

#72 torakris

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Posted 21 March 2005 - 09:31 PM

And are they pretty much palatable only when hot? Or is the cooled version (that I might pack in my lunch tomorrow, for instance) still edible?

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Mochi cooked in these ways in one of those foods that is definitely best when eaten hot or at least warm. They harden again upon cooling and I wouldn't recommend them as a next day lunch.

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#73 Hiroyuki

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 04:59 AM

And, don't forget the Toaster Oven thread. See post #1.
Grill mochi in your toaster oven!

#74 therese

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 08:53 AM

Thanks everybody for the timely and informative replies. Particularly glad to hear from Hiroyuki that my local Japanese grocery stocks a quality product---I guess if you're going to bother to import it it may as well be nice quality.

Anyway, I got up this AM and decided to try mochi with cheese on top, as per Helen's suggestion. So a put a piece on a plate, sprinkled it with parmesan, and popped it in the microwave, setting the timer to 90 seconds with some trepidation because this item really didn't seem like it had enough water in it to successfully microwave.

But 40 seconds later my kirimochi was blebbing all over the place (explaining a curious illustration on the back of the package that showed precisely this phenomenon) and the previously soap-like block had turned to a very nicely gooey serving of mochi. I added some soy sauce to up the saltiness/flavor aspect of the dish, and ate breakfast. Mmmm.

I have access to a microwave at work, so I think I'll be trying some variations for lunch, just cooking it here. Maybe a version in broth, or with any of the bajillion different Japanese condiments/dressings that I keep acquiring.

Of course, now I'm going to have to go back to the Japanese grocery, and this is problematic because I'm going to want to buy more daifuku and Pocky and salty snacks and...

Or maybe I'll be able to keep to the straight and narrow and just get kirimochi and konnyaku. :wink:
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#75 Hiroyuki

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Posted 22 March 2005 - 04:03 PM

Another advantage of Sato's Kirimochi is that each piece of mochi is individually and aseptically packed so it keeps for long and won't get moldy.

I usually use my toaster oven to grill mochi. That way, I can get a crust that is slightly scorched. Yum! :biggrin:

Daifuku is usually made from mochi-ko,
http://konny.fc2web...._daifuku_e.html
but you can also make it from kirimochi.
I'll post a recipe if you like.

WARNING!!
Eating mochi can be risky, especially to the elderly and small children. When serving mochi to them, cut it into small pieces. Everyone in Japan knows that, yet there are several people who die of choking on mochi each year.

If I follow Helen's recipe, I will sprinkle some sesame seeds and bonito flakes, as well as soy sauce, after grilling. :biggrin:

#76 therese

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Posted 23 March 2005 - 02:17 PM

And, don't forget the Toaster Oven thread.  See post #1.
Grill mochi in your toaster oven!

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Thanks for the link. Cool trick about putting a dab of soy sauce on the surface want to "puff" the most.

I don't have a toaster over, but the smaller of my regular ovens should work just fine.

A recipe using kirimochi to make daifuku would be very cool. Thanks in advance. :smile:

I've never bought mochi-ko. Would I buy it fresh? Or frozen, or vacuum-packed?
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#77 Hiroyuki

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 12:03 AM

A recipe using kirimochi to make daifuku would be very cool. Thanks in advance.  :smile:

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Note: If mochiko is readily available in your area, please don't bother yourself trying this recipe; instead, try the recipe I provided above.

Ingredients for 10 daikufu:

4 (200 g) kirimochi
60 to 80 g sugar
60 cc water
350 g anko (azuki bean jam)
Potato starch

Steps:
1. Make 10 anko balls, 35 g each.
2. Put potato starch in a vat.
3. Place kirimochi in a heat-resistant bowl, pour hot water enough to cover kirimochi, and heat the bowl in a microwave for about 4 minutes.
4. Make syrup: Mix sugar and water in a nonstick pot or frypan, put it on stove to dissolve. Take care not to scorch.
5. When kirimochi soften, drain water, knead with a moistened wooden spatula until smooth. Add hot syrup in 3 to 4 portions.
6. Transfer kirimochi to a pot, and knead over low to medium heat until a good texture. If it becomes too hard, add a little water.
7. Transfer kirimochi to a vat of starch, put starch on your hands, and divide kirimochi into 10 equal parts.
8. Spread each part into a circle, place an anko ball, and wrap it.

#78 Hiroyuki

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Posted 24 March 2005 - 12:10 AM

I've never bought mochi-ko. Would I buy it fresh? Or frozen, or vacuum-packed?

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Okay, so I've just figured out that mochi-ko is apparently the flour.

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Right, mochiko flour.
ko (粉 in Kanji) means flour or powder.
http://www.hormel.co...7695&catitemid=
http://images.google...ja&start=0&sa=N

#79 chibirisu

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 01:10 PM

Anybody have opinions on mochi makers? (like <a href="http://www.amazon.co...?v=glance">this one?</a>

Local club's thinking about making mochi and dango for a fundraiser, but I'm torn between the box-of-mochiko-and-hot-water method and the get-a-machine-and-start-from-mochigome method (since we don't have access to the big mortar and pestle rigs around here, "here" being the midddle of soybeansville Illinois).

#80 MomOfLittleFoodies

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 03:05 PM

You can make your own uzu (mortar) to make mochi in.

The big Buddhist temple that my family goes to in Los Angeles made uzus out of galvanized washtub that they filled with cement and sunk a metal mixing bowl into while the cement was still wet.
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#81 Hiroyuki

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Posted 30 October 2005 - 05:05 PM

As I mentioned somewhere else, my father owns one of those machines. He wanted to get a second-hand kine and usu for a long time, but now he is quite satisfied with his machine. I think that a mochi-making machine will be a good investment if you are going to organize such an event regularly. Otherwise, mochiko sounds more practical.

#82 AzianBrewer

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 09:41 PM

Hiroyuki....Deep fried mochi??? Now you're talkin'! Is it the tempura/beer battered style, coated with panko or just throw it in hot oil without coating?
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#83 Hiroyuki

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Posted 31 October 2005 - 10:49 PM

Hiroyuki....Deep fried mochi???  Now you're talkin'!  Is it the tempura/beer battered style, coated with panko or just throw it in hot oil without coating?

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Which post of mine are you referring to?? Anyway, no coating. I wish I could eat it now, but it's too high in calorie, I think. :sad:

#84 AzianBrewer

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 07:32 AM

First of all, Sato's Kirimochi is one of the high-quality mochi products available in Japan.  Some lower-quality mochi products contain starch, are less sticky, and are somewhat translucent.

Mochi is usually served hot.  It turns hard when cool, requiring you to reheat it.

If you want to know the details of any of the dishes shown on the page you mentioned, please let me know.

Here is a brief description of the dishes shown on the page:

1.  Deep-fried wonton mochi

2.  Okonomiyaki with mochi

3.  Izobe (nori) mochi with butter

4.  Porridge with mochi

5.  Nori-wrapped, deep-fried mochi

6.  Mochi pizza

7.  Ramen with mochi

8.  Diced and deep-fried mochi

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This one here.
Leave the gun, take the canoli

#85 chibirisu

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 09:17 AM

As I mentioned somewhere else, my father owns one of those machines.  He wanted to get a second-hand kine and usu for a long time, but now he is quite satisfied with his machine.  I think that a mochi-making machine will be a good investment if you are going to organize such an event regularly.  Otherwise, mochiko sounds more practical.

View Post


Thanks for the info! We're probably going to do them about six times a year, for about a hundred people at a time. I'm on the fence about whether that makes it worth it -- on the one hand, when making mochi for a hundred people, a machine WOULD be pretty darn handy, but on the other hand it's not happening all THAT often... ponder ponder. Glad to hear the things are parentally-approved though!

AzianBrewer: I know kiri-mochi goes straight into the fryer as is, without any batter coating. I don't know if you'd want to put fresh soft mochi in a fryer, I get the feeling the moisture might make it sputter a lot, but I've never tried it so it might not be so bad. (I'm a little paranoid about fryers to begin with, though; my mom tipped one over on herself when I was about 8, she's still got the scars, and I've still got the nightmares, so I'm really really cautious about anything I put in boiling oil...)

#86 Hiroyuki

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 03:17 PM

First of all, Sato's Kirimochi is one of the high-quality mochi products available in Japan.  Some lower-quality mochi products contain starch, are less sticky, and are somewhat translucent.

Mochi is usually served hot.  It turns hard when cool, requiring you to reheat it.

If you want to know the details of any of the dishes shown on the page you mentioned, please let me know.

Here is a brief description of the dishes shown on the page:

1.  Deep-fried wonton mochi

2.  Okonomiyaki with mochi

3.  Izobe (nori) mochi with butter

4.  Porridge with mochi

5.  Nori-wrapped, deep-fried mochi

6.  Mochi pizza

7.  Ramen with mochi

8.  Diced and deep-fried mochi

View Post


This one here.

View Post

OK, thanks.
1. Deep-fried wanton mochi:
Wrap diced mochi in wanton skins and deep-fry quickly. Eat with ketchup and so on.
8. Diced and deep-fried mochi:
Make "arare" (sembei-like snack made from glutinous rice) by deep-frying diced mochi without coating until crispy, sprinkle some salt, ao nori, ichimi togarashi, and so on.

The age mochi (deep-fried mochi) that my mother used to make when I was a teenager was kiri mochi simply deep-fried without coating. I used to eat it with soy sauce.

***
I found an error in 3. above. Not "Izobe" but "Isobe".
3. Izobe (nori) mochi with butter

#87 torakris

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 03:24 PM

chibirisu,
6 times a year for 100 people???
Get a machine! :biggrin:

I know people that have machines and they use it once a year for way less people...

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#88 sanrensho

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Posted 01 November 2005 - 10:47 PM

^__^ My mom's telling me that too, and she doesn't do Japanese cooking at all. I just keep thinking how many boxes of mochiko I could buy for the price of that machine... ^^;;


I agree with your Mom (and Torakris). Get a machine! My parents have owned a mochi making machine for over 20 years and they only use it one or two times a year.
Baker of "impaired" cakes...

#89 chibirisu

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Posted 02 November 2005 - 06:08 PM

I agree with your Mom (and Torakris). Get a machine! My parents have owned a mochi making machine for over 20 years and they only use it one or two times a year.

View Post


I'm thinking about it pretty seriously -- one of the main reasons I haven't already jumped at it is because so many of the recipes out there for mochi-related sweets (daifuku, dango, etc.) call for the mochiko method of making instead of the pounded-rice method of making.

Is that just because it's easier to find mochiko, and would mochi from a machine be better for making things like dango and daifuku? Or does the texture need to be more like mochiko when making desserts, and the mochi pounder's specifically for plain-rice-no-sugar-no-fillings, New Years-type mochi?

My original impression was that the mochiko method would be better for daifuku and the pounding method would be better for dango, because dango would need to be a little stiffer in order to survive skewering, but I just got done looking at a page on the Japanese-language Tsuji Institute site that has them making dango from mochiko, and I figure they're pretty authoritative, so I'm still scratching my head...

#90 Hiroyuki

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Posted 04 November 2005 - 03:50 AM

I agree with your Mom (and Torakris). Get a machine! My parents have owned a mochi making machine for over 20 years and they only use it one or two times a year.

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I'm thinking about it pretty seriously -- one of the main reasons I haven't already jumped at it is because so many of the recipes out there for mochi-related sweets (daifuku, dango, etc.) call for the mochiko method of making instead of the pounded-rice method of making.

Is that just because it's easier to find mochiko, and would mochi from a machine be better for making things like dango and daifuku? Or does the texture need to be more like mochiko when making desserts, and the mochi pounder's specifically for plain-rice-no-sugar-no-fillings, New Years-type mochi?

My original impression was that the mochiko method would be better for daifuku and the pounding method would be better for dango, because dango would need to be a little stiffer in order to survive skewering, but I just got done looking at a page on the Japanese-language Tsuji Institute site that has them making dango from mochiko, and I figure they're pretty authoritative, so I'm still scratching my head...

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If you are so serious about the texture, why not make mochi from mochi rice, using a mochi making machine, and mochi sweets from mochiko, like we usually do in Japan?

But think about this: You can make decent daifuku from kiri mochi, not from mochiko or shiratamako (finer than mochiko), as my wife once proved by following a recipe (I posted another recipe here), and I once made mitarashi dango for my children from leftover cooked rice, not from joshinko (regular rice flour), which was different in texture from regular mitarashi dango, but was not bad at all.

As for dango, recipes differ greatly: Some recipes for mitarashi dango call for joshinko only, and some call for both mochiko and joshinko. As its name suggests, shiratama dango calls for shiratamako.

***
I forgot to include a link to this webpage, which describes how to make mochi from mochiko. It's in Japanese, but I assume you can read Japanese. Am I right?

Edited by Hiroyuki, 04 November 2005 - 03:52 AM.






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