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Mochi

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#31 torakris

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Posted 21 June 2004 - 03:24 PM

This question of how many kinds of mochi has really gotten to me :blink: I like things perfectly organized, this was wonderful when I was working as a reference librarian, and I am having a really hard time categorizing mochi!! :angry: You should see how many pages in my notebook I have gone through with various notes.....
I have come up with 6 main categories:

1. things made with mochi rice in the actual rice form
2. things made with mochi rice that has been steamed, pounded and formed into shapes
3. things made with mochi-ko, mochi rice that has been washed, ground and dried
4. things made with shiratama-ko, mochi rice that has been soaked, smashed, rinsed and dried
5. things made with doumyouji-ko, mochi rice that has been steamed, dried and then cut into tiny pieces
6. things not made with mochi but have mochi in the name

Most of these have both sweet and savory applications and know to break them down one at a time......

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#32 torakris

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Posted 23 June 2004 - 05:10 PM

I am still working on ways to break these mochi into categories, probably start by breaking eat main category into sweet or savory but then from there you have cooked (usually steamed), pounded, filled, coated, etc... :blink:

Some others that are probably their own category are mochi made by being mixed with another food stuff, like kusamochi (mugwort), others include, kurumi mochi (walnut), awamochi (millet), and tochimochi (horse chestnut). a picture is here:

http://www.gokayama-...Tochimochi.html

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#33 torakris

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Posted 24 June 2004 - 08:28 PM

still making no headway in the catefories department, but I just finished eating some zunda-mochi, a ball of mochi surrounded with sweetened edamame paste.

Posted Image

These are really popular now and will be for the rest of summer as it is edamame season.


In the store today I saw an interesting daifuku, it was called cheese daifuku :blink: and it didn't say what kind of cheese it was filled with but it also had rum raisins inside.....
I don't like rum raisins or sweetened cheese things so I passed on it.

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#34 melonpan

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Posted 30 September 2004 - 01:07 AM

komochi image

i have seen the above sold at the grocery market. it is labeled as komochi. what is it and how is it served?
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#35 Hiroyuki

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Posted 30 September 2004 - 09:17 PM

Tokyo (where I was born and bred) and Niigata (where I live at present) are both in the kakumochi (rectangular mochi) culture area. On the other hand, Osaka and Kyoto are in the marumochi (round mochi) culture area.
I have never heard of, seen, or eaten komochi (lit. small mochi).
Some sites use the terms komochi and marumochi interchangeably. One site says that komochi were given away to family members and servants on New Year's Day.
Some sites like this one
http://www.betterhom...ru/106/106.html
make a distinction between marumochi and maru komochi (round, small mochi), but I can't tell their difference from the pictures.
So, I can't really tell you what komochi are, but I guess that they can be used just like maru mochi (grill, boil, etc.).

#36 Hiroyuki

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Posted 30 September 2004 - 09:38 PM

If anyone is interested,
Chart showing zouni culture areas in Japan
http://www.konishi.c.../zouni_map.html
Explanation of symbols (from top to right):
Kakumochi, grilled
Kakumochi, boiled
Marumochi, grilled
Marumochi, boiled
An mochi (mochi with anko in it), boiled
Red miso soup
Sumashi (light soup)
White miso soup
Azuki bean soup

Zouni is a type of soup with mochi in in, eaten on New Year's Holidays.

#37 v. gautam

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Posted 01 October 2004 - 07:08 PM

Have 2 very ignorant questions:

1) helenjp speaks of mochi-grade millet and awa-mochi: could you please explain what mochi-grade millet would be, and elaborate a little on this particular dish, which sounds wonderful. Could it be made from ingredients available in the US?

2 a) our local markets stock refrigerated, rectangular packages of mochi that look grayish and seem to be pretty hard. How would one go about using this form in sweet and savory dishes?

2b) our local asian grocery stocks what they call cantonese shao bing, which is a mochi cake filled with sweet bean paste, probably pan-fried; to eat, one needs to heat it up a bit. if left too long in the microwave oven, it baloons up and collapses. i would like to learn some more about making these, that are quite different to another sweet called beijing shao bing sold at he same place, but made of flour and whatnot.

#38 torakris

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Posted 02 October 2004 - 11:17 PM

2 a) our local markets stock refrigerated, rectangular packages of mochi that look grayish and seem to be pretty hard.  How would one go about using this form in sweet and savory dishes?

View Post



I can help with this one, those are probably dried mochi cakes and best way to serve them is either grilled or deep fried, there are many variations but teh most common being soy sauce and nori for savory and either anko (red bean paste) or kinako (ground roasted soy bean powder).
here are some pictures and recipes:
http://www.bob-an.co...ochi/mochi.html

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#39 dougery

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Posted 03 October 2004 - 11:00 AM

Ahhh Mochi! One of my most favorite foods of all time!!

roasted with shoyu and nori is my favorite way to eat it.

roasted in hot water with salt OR w/hot water and ochazuke

I can eat mochi all day long!

My cousin owns a mochi factory in Japan and he knows I am quite fond of mochi. My mother thinks it is hillarious that at Christmas time he sends me a box of mochi.
"Live every moment as if your hair were on fire" Zen Proverb

#40 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 03:29 AM

Recently, on a trip to Japan (in Nara), I discovered the heaven that is freshly pounded mochi. It was warm and delicately soft, with tsubushian (red beans) inside, colored green with yomogi, and dipped in Kinako.

Then I realized that my fiance's mother has a large stone usu (pounding bowl) and heavy wooden mallet (kine) in the garage that hasn't been used in years (last user...probably my fiance's grandmother).

So Ive decided Im going to inherit these items and teach myself how to do mochi pounding, since my fiance and his mother dont know how. Has anyone done this and any suggestions?? Is it really as simple as it sounds (see weblink below)?

My usu and kine look just like the one in this picture:
http://web-japan.org...ure/occ_12.html

#41 Palladion

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 06:27 AM

I pounded a bit of the old mochi at a festival at my school a month and a half ago. They had quite a setup:

First: a few outdoor rice steamers, sort of like kama pots, with wood burning beneath them. This was, obviously, to steam the mochi rice.

After steaming, the cooked rice was unloaded into a large, blender-like contraption. It ran through the machine for a while, and the small spinning blade did the initially work of

After that, the rice glob was transfered to the usu to be pounded. This was a two person task: one to swing the mallet, the other to turn the rice after each blow. They had to work up a good rhythm -- you definitely do not want your hand to get whacked by the mallet. Every once in a while, they would stop to feel the rice, sometimes adding a little water. This would continue until they judged the rice thouroughly pounded.

I took a few pictures at the event. I'll look through them tomorrow and see if there are any of particular interest.

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#42 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 12:37 PM

Cool....did you have to do anything to the usu to keep the mochi from sticking to it?

The guys I saw pounding mochi in Nara had 3 guys pounding in a rhythm, they'd pound for a few rounds, then turn the mochi.

Cant wait to see the pics:)

#43 MomOfLittleFoodies

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Posted 23 November 2004 - 01:48 PM

The Buddhist temple that my mother's family attends does mochitsuki every year. The first batch and last batch of the day are always pounded by hand, using improvised usu (big metal mixing bowls set in concrete inside galvanized steel wash tubs) and traditional kine. All of the batches between get the usu/kine treatment, then get run though machines and hand rolled.

The Buddhist temple my husbands family goes to sometimes has a mochitsuki demonstration for the Sunday school a couple of weeks after New Years, using my in-laws stone usu and another family's kine.
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#44 Hiroyuki

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 12:43 AM

Assuming that your fiance can read Japanese, I think that the following two links will provide all the necessary information for mochi making. Mochi making is roughly divided into steaming, kneading, and pounding processes, of which the kneading process is the most strenuous and is often neglected. Without sufficient kneading, grains of rice will scatter around as you pound it.
http://www.octv.ne.j...2/december.html
http://aosuji.hp.inf...p/motitsuki.htm

I think that store-bought mochi can be as good as just pounded mochi if you just put it in a container, add a small amount of water, wrap it, and heat it in a microwave.

#45 Palladion

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 05:53 AM

Errm, I guess I didn't take any pictures of the pounding process. I thought I had... :unsure:

Sorry. But I did take this picture of the rice steaming setup that they had:
Posted Image


Mochi making is roughly divided into steaming, kneading, and pounding processes, of which the kneading process is the most strenuous and is often neglected.  Without sufficient kneading, grains of rice will scatter around as you pound it.

View Post


That blender-like device that I had mentioned earlier (it was bigger and heavy, with a small, high-powered spinner in the middle) was used to knead the rice at the festival I attended.

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Alex Parker

#46 torakris

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Posted 24 November 2004 - 03:32 PM

I don't know anyone who pounds rice at home....
I see it normally at schools and festivals, most people use these:
http://www.toshiba.c...er/pfc_20fk.htm
nowadays.
a mochitsuki machine that will do all the work for you! it also doubles as a bread machine.

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#47 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 02:44 AM

Hiroyuki,
Thank you so much for those links above, unfortunately, my fiance is yon-sei (4th generation Japanese raised in Hawaii) and he and his mother can only read hiragana, and Ive forgotten most of my Kanji, but the pics are really helpful anyways.

One question though, on the website it has a picture of the usu and kine...soaking in water from the day before?
木臼の場合は、前日から水をはっておく。(石臼の場合は、必要なし)
当日、始まる前から湯を貯めておき臼を暖める。(もちがさめないように)

Well, this weekend I am going to go for it! Ill post pics if it works out!

Edited by Kiem Hwa, 25 November 2004 - 11:39 AM.


#48 Hiroyuki

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Posted 25 November 2004 - 03:42 AM

木臼の場合は、前日から水をはっておく。(石臼の場合は、必要なし)
当日、始まる前から湯を貯めておき臼を暖める。(もちがさめないように)

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The Japanese is translated as follows:
For a wooden usu, you must put water (in the concave portion) the day before. (For a stone usu, you need not.)
On the day (of mochi pounding), put in hot water to warm the usu before you begin (so that the mochi doesn't get cool).

How much mochi rice are you going to use? The standard amount of mochi rice for one batch is 2 shou, i.e., approximately 2.8 kg, as one of the sites says. Maybe you may want to start with a smaller amount, say, 1 shou (1.4 kg).

#49 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 02:41 AM

So I did it...pounded mochi for my first time, that is. Actually, my MIL told her cousin about our plans, and it turns out one of his friends pounds mochi every New Years (and now that we have been talking about it, we have found ALOT of people around here who do it every New Years).

Well, my MIL's cousin's friend was so excited about it, he loaded up his truck with his burner and drove over here to give us a demo. Well, even though he ended up doing all the pounding, I learned alot, also that the first try is never very successful...

I have to say, the most difficult part was getting it all pounded to the desired consistency before it cooled off too much.

Also, our kine (pounder) splintered whenever we hit the stone and not the mochi ball, so we ended up with some very "fibrous and....nutritious" mochi. Well, I did put my dried yomogi into the second batch to make it green, and we stuffed them with tsubushian, and dipped them into kinako....

So in the end, I cant say it was anywhere near the wonderful mochi I had in Nara, but its a start and we will do it again on New Years!

Mochi..the final product
Posted Image

Steaming the rice on the stove in an old wooden steamer:
Posted Image

Inside the wooden steamer
Posted Image

Edited by slkinsey, 01 December 2004 - 09:29 AM.


#50 Hiroyuki

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Posted 01 December 2004 - 05:24 AM

In Japan, we have this saying, mochi wa mochi-ya. :biggrin:

●餅は餅屋
[英訳] For rice cakes, go to a rice-cake maker.

From here
http://www8.plala.or...otowaza-mo.html

#51 Hiroyuki

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 02:33 AM

The other day, an aquaintance gave me a pack of mochi (rice cakes). We had them for tonight's supper. They contain kombu and salt and we all found them very delicious. To my surprise, my daughter ate three of them.
Posted Image
Posted Image

#52 torakris

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 02:55 AM

from the back of the package I gather it is called kombu mochi?
Is this a Niigata speciality? :biggrin:

I don't recall ever seeing this before..
how did you prepare them?

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#53 Hiroyuki

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 03:55 AM

from the back of the package I gather it is called kombu mochi?
Is this a Niigata speciality? :biggrin:

I don't recall ever seeing this before..
how did you prepare them?

View Post

Sorry to tell you that it's not a Niigata speciality. This particular product is from Komatsu, Ishikawa prefecture, but I think kombu mochi is available everywhere in Japan.

How did I prepare them? Just the usual way, not innovative at all - We heated some in the microwave with some water until soft and ate them with kinako and sugar, and toasted some in the toaster oven and dipped them in soy sauce and wrapped nori around them.

#54 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 02 December 2004 - 07:32 PM

[Kakumochi, grilled
Kakumochi, boiled
Marumochi, grilled
Marumochi, boiled
An mochi (mochi with anko in it), boiled
Red miso soup
Sumashi (light soup)
White miso soup
Azuki bean soup

View Post

[/quote]


Wow, are these all types of ozoni?

Sounds interesting. Does anyone have any interesting ozoni recipes?

My friend's mom made a great ozoni I've since been trying to replicate....not so sucessfully though....She said it has: chicken broth, clams (canned), nishime konbu, mizuna, and mochi... Maybe Im missing something...or maybe I'll call her again this New Years.

A few other "interesting" ways Ive had mochi:

- At a teppanyaki grill place in Osaka, the guy grilled a piece of mochi, until he could flatten it out, then topped it with a mixture of mayonaise and roe (the little ones), then topped that with cheese (mozarella, i think), then he melted the cheese and fired the top with a little propane burner, then layered nori over it..... it was great... :wub:
Im trying to make my own versions now.... So far Ive added in Shoyu and furikake.

-Mochi in okonomiyaki.

Hmm....now Im trying to think of other creative ways to eat my mochi....

#55 torakris

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Posted 03 December 2004 - 12:03 AM

ozouni actually has its own thread!

http://forums.egulle...st=0&p=449582

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#56 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 05 December 2004 - 06:18 PM

Today I bought this:
Posted Image

Okomoni Mochi!

with kelp
with yomogi
with kuromame (black soybeans)

How should I eat it? I want to accentuate the mochi, not put it into anything else (like okonomiyaki or ozoni)

Actually, is there a specific purpose for this?

#57 torakris

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Posted 05 December 2004 - 09:32 PM

I would just grill them and dip them in soy sauce, yum!

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#58 torakris

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 06:50 PM

great pictures!

I think the only way to prevent the kinako ones from getting "sweaty" is to coat them with unbelievable amounts of kinako and eat them really fast. :biggrin:

We had a small mochi tsuki party last week with a bunch of neighbors, we used a machine though.....
we can kinako mochi, mochi with home made anko paste (tsubu kind), and mochi with grated daikon and soy sauce (my favorite) and mcohi with nori and katsuobushi and soy sauce. It was a great lunch but I forgot my camera....

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#59 Kiem Hwa

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Posted 01 January 2005 - 06:58 PM

Also, the day before we pounded our New Year's mochi, MIL and I went to her friend's house, and we "pounded" mochi, using her friend's mochi-making machine. She also had this little apparatus to squeeze the mochi through afterwards, so we could make uniform sized mochis. These mochis were very pretty looking (too bad I didn't take my camera).
So you would think that after all that practice, the mochi we made on the next day for New Years would come out looking nicer.... hmm... Maybe I need that mochi-squeezing apparatus.....

#60 Hiroyuki

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Posted 02 January 2005 - 04:13 PM

On January 1 and 2, a total of four people, all elderly, died from choking on mochi in the Kanto area alone.
I think you already know the risks of eating mochi, but just in case you don't, make sure you cut mochi into small pieces before serving them to the elderly and small children. Don't let a wonderful experience with mochi turn into a tragedy...





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