Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Different Names for the Same Food Item: What's in a Name?


  • Please log in to reply
36 replies to this topic

#31 weedy

weedy
  • participating member
  • 186 posts

Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:28 PM

The word Coriander is the French name, so in all honesty there is no English word for it. Cilantro is the main term for it in the USA

 

as of about 10 years ago, perhaps

 

before that, every store that HAD it called it coriander



#32 SobaAddict70

SobaAddict70
  • legacy participant
  • 7,609 posts
  • Location:Hobbiton, the Shire

Posted 18 August 2014 - 10:39 PM

seems Gourmet supports Weedy's comment above:

http://www.gourmet.c...rld-of-cilantro

#33 Porthos

Porthos
  • participating member
  • 1,217 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 19 August 2014 - 10:09 AM

Here in southern California I have always found it as cilantro.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Unrelenting Carnivore
"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#34 heidih

heidih
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 10,841 posts
  • Location:Los Angeles

Posted 19 August 2014 - 10:58 AM

Here in southern California I have always found it as cilantro.

 

Actually back in the late 60's, very early 70's I think Chinese Parsley was in fashion in the mainstream markets



#35 Porthos

Porthos
  • participating member
  • 1,217 posts
  • Location:Southern California

Posted 19 August 2014 - 02:17 PM

Actually back in the late 60's, very early 70's I think Chinese Parsley was in fashion in the mainstream markets

I had no idea what cilantro was until I married in 1978. My family of origin was very basic meat and potatoes. When I began cooking the family dinner in 1967 I soon bored of cooking the same old same old. I had to be very careful about how far away from basic I ranged but I did try new (to me) things. I still have a very clear memory of the first white sauce I made.

 

Even though I often accompanied my mother to the supermarket I did not really pay attention to what was available and what things were called since I was cooking to the tastes of my parents and that is what my mother shopped for. I don't think I even realized that there were any other potatoes than russet at the time. Anyway, what I'm doing a poor job of saying is that I have no doubt that before my grocery shopping for myself I would have no memory of the other names for cilantro but have no trouble accepting that cilantro was called by another name.


Porthos Potwatcher
The Unrelenting Carnivore
"If every pork chop was perfect, we wouldn't have hot dogs." (source unknown)
Customer to clerk in a clothing store, "Do you have these in a size for people who actually eat?"


#36 pbear

pbear
  • participating member
  • 420 posts
  • Location:San Francisco

Posted 19 August 2014 - 09:11 PM

One that bugs me is the common mislabeling of poblanos as pasillas.  They aren't.  They're fresh (usually unripe) anchos.  Pasillas, meanwhile, are dried chilacas.  See Cook's Thesaurus, comparing fresh and dried chiles.

 

FWIW, Cook's Thesaurus plunks for cilantro as the preferred name for the herb.



#37 CatPoet

CatPoet
  • participating member
  • 819 posts
  • Location:Småland

Posted 23 August 2014 - 01:53 PM

Well Västerbotten is a brand name and can only be made in Burträsk  but Herrgård. Präst, Svecia, Grevé and hushåll are also name protected and doesnt matter which company who makes it, they have to follow guide lines.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.