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Precision Cooked Egg Yolks

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#1 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:51 AM

Id like to start a thread on uses for previously SV’d egg yolks.

 

Hats of to the Anova group for the term Precision Cooking.  I like it, but it has so many more letters than SV

 

Sooo  Ill use PCook for SV.  I can afford 3 more letters, after all. But this is not about terms, what ever merits they might have.  Its about the PCook’d yolk.  Easy to do in Bulk, No plastic, just the natural shell.  chill, dry, put back in the refig. and use ‘ at will. ‘

 

Polyscience’s chart is nice :

 

https://www.cuisinet...rence Guide.pdf

 

In the Mayo + thread I got the idea to add a yolk or two to Hellman’s and see what’s up

 

Here it is:  

 

http://forums.egulle...ic/148803-mayo/

 

First , I brought out some frozen ‘SV’ butter :

 

SV butter 5.jpg

 

Yes, its plain butter I routinely get when on sale, and 6 sticks fit nicely in the 8 x 10 SV

 

Bag.  Its of course not heated ! The bag prevents freezer burn, and Freezer Flavor from migrating into the butter.  As I need a stick, I cut open the bag, take out a frozen stick, and quickly reseal the bag so little moisture condenses on the next seal.  N.B.:  the bag has already given up one stick

 

SV Butter 4.jpg

 

Resealed, back in the freezer for the 4 sticks.

 

PCook Egg Butter.jpg

 

Here is a PCook’s egg, cracked open directly from the refrigerator. ( not really water bath PC, these were left over from some experiments w the CuisiSteamBoy .)   There is a thread on that if your’e interested. This is exactly what a water-bath egg looks like cracked open.  Note there is some white albumen in the shells, and the yolk is coated in cooked whites with quite a bit of loose white ‘ on the side’

 

PCook egg yolk.jpg

 

Note the white easily ‘peels’ off the yolk.  The yolk w most of the white removed was placed in a bowl:

 

Pcook egg yolk bowl.jpg Pcook egg yolk bowl.jpg

 

The Knob of butter, which you see above was microwaved until soft, with a bit melted.  This was whisked into the plain yolk:

 

PC yolk butter.jpg

 

Its a bit hard to see, but this mixture is fairly stiff, and holds its shape.  Its still a bit cool.  I did not heat up.  Added a bit of salt and tasted it.  Delicious.  Added a drop of two of lemon juice, even better.

 

If you can Precision Cook the whole egg, to what ever temp on the chart correspond to  yolk that pleases you, you can chill and keep these eggs in the refrigerator for ‘Long Time’  they are after all pasteurized. You might even develop a liking for several different yolk textures.  They are a tight fit as you can see on the chart.

 

With a seasoning / herb / flavor profile of your choice, made well in advance, you have a decent “ ---aise “ of the butter school any time you want one.  Work time  : about a minute. Also available for 1 minute orders  the Mayo + “ ---- aise “

 

Fantastic , correct,  if you are of the ‘ ---aise ‘ school of sauce.

 

You will have to run around the block many many many more times, let me warn you in advance, if you choose to use yolks this way.  

 

So  if you PCook eggs, what might you do w the yolks ?  For Whites , see the SV Eggs thread.

 

Bon Apetite.



#2 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 10:53 AM

sorry about the two pics the same.  i cant seem to delete pics that were placed in the wrong order.



#3 Paul Bacino

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:07 PM

I could see this in Carbonara ..

 


Its good to have Morels

#4 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:15 PM

its very interesting you mention this.

 

i make carbonara all the time.  I just use beaten eggs.

 

the Test Kitchen on TV recently did this and tempered the beaten eggs w pasta water, and they used very little water for the  pasta 

 

cooking so the water had a fair bit more 'starch'  they claimed that starch and tempering the eggs prevented the beaten eggs from

 

getting gummy on the final pasta dish.

 

I guess Ive been lucky, my carbonara was never gummy.  maybe a bit of pasta water just before serving to loosen it up

 

but thanks for the insight

 

Its In The Book, for future refs.



#5 Anna N

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:26 PM

rotuts,

I have no trouble understanding precision cooked eggs. But I tend to get really hung up on how long these eggs can be safely stored. You say "long time", USDA SAYS ONE WEEK. Now I am not suggesting that the USDA knows better than you, but I would like to see you define more precisely "long time". My understanding of their limited shelf life once cooked has to do with nature's coating on the outside of an egg which is partially removed by the processor and fully destroyed by cooking. I will admit to being overly cautious about the shelf life of foods. Still.....
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#6 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:35 PM

your points are good ones.   I dont really know. I didnt mean to be flip about it.

 

as regular store eggs, which these are, keep in a cold refrig for  ----, even with the natural coating removed for cleaning.

 

Im not being fussy here  I just dont know

 

these eggs, are pasteurized, so might keep for a bit more time.  

 

so your points a good ones. and i just cant say.

 

so   eat em up or plan ahead   I think in a cold refrigerator, for a few weeks ?

 

again, i just dont know.

 

I guess the question is  How long does a pasteurized egg keep in a cold refrigerator ?

 

Anybody ?


Edited by rotuts, 25 June 2014 - 12:37 PM.


#7 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 12:49 PM

thanks A.N. for getting me thinking

 

i found this :

 

http://www.safeeggs.com/eggs/more-faqs

 

look down near the bottom :

 

6- 8 weeks plus

 

if there is a problem here, the eggs I do go back into the original egg container

 

how clean is that ?

 

maybe better in a clean plastic bag

 

just a guess.

 

I personally would not keep them that long.

 

its just they are easy to do.


Edited by rotuts, 25 June 2014 - 12:50 PM.


#8 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 02:07 PM

rotuts,

I have no trouble understanding precision cooked eggs. But I tend to get really hung up on how long these eggs can be safely stored. You say "long time", USDA SAYS ONE WEEK. Now I am not suggesting that the USDA knows better than you, but I would like to see you define more precisely "long time". My understanding of their limited shelf life once cooked has to do with nature's coating on the outside of an egg which is partially removed by the processor and fully destroyed by cooking. I will admit to being overly cautious about the shelf life of foods. Still.....

 

From the J.D. Schuman et. al. (1997) egg pasteurization research paper:

 

http://onlinelibrary...997.00253.x/pdf

 

"Defining the appropriate refrigerated shelf-life for in-shell pasteurized eggs is a final important product development issue. Research in our laboratories has demonstrated that the interior quality (albumen pH, Haugh units, albumen foaming power) of immersion-heated eggs (with or without oiling) did not deteriorate further during 4 weeks of storage at 7 deg or 22 deg C (unpublished data)."

 

Where does the USDA say pasteurized eggs may be kept one week?  Somewhere I recall reading that cooked egg dishes should be kept for only one week, but I don't think this is the same consideration.



#9 Anna N

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 02:21 PM

From the J.D. Schuman et. al. (1997) egg pasteurization research paper:
 
http://onlinelibrary...997.00253.x/pdf
 
"Defining the appropriate refrigerated shelf-life for in-shell pasteurized eggs is a final important product development issue. Research in our laboratories has demonstrated that the interior quality (albumen pH, Haugh units, albumen foaming power) of immersion-heated eggs (with or without oiling) did not deteriorate further during 4 weeks of storage at 7 deg or 22 deg C (unpublished data)."
 
Where does the USDA say pasteurized eggs may be kept one week?  Somewhere I recall reading that cooked egg dishes should be kept for only one week, but I don't think this is the same consideration.


I don't believe I suggested that one week was referring to pasteurized eggs. Sorry if you inferred otherwise. I see that rotuts did claim his eggs were pasteurized and they likely are.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#10 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 02:42 PM

I had inferred pasteurized.  I apologize for that.



#11 paulraphael

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 03:20 PM

The point about the coatings on the eggs being destroyed by cooking is new to me. Is there still any coating left on the eggs after they're washed (as is the practice in the U.S.?)

 

It's been my assumption that pasteurized eggs would last a few months in the fridge—not at the peak of quality or freshness, but that they'd be safe. I haven't seen any studies to back this up.


Edited by paulraphael, 26 June 2014 - 03:21 PM.


#12 dcarch

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 03:46 PM

That's what I have been doing. I use SV to pasteurize the eggs first for carbonara.

 

dcarch



#13 chefmd

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 02:36 AM

I just recently had very pretty looking caesar salad at Trio Grill in Falls Church, VA. Should have taken a picture!

 

It had egg yolk on top that was clearly cooked sous vide, raw looking but not very runny.  Also, there was no sign of egg white suggesting that eggs were separated before cooking.  There is chefsteps recipe for yolks cooked in oil.  http://www.chefsteps.com/activities/perfect-yolks

 

I can see serving yolks on salads, pastas, steak tartar, etc.


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