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"Deconstructing the Perfect Burger," 26 June 2014 in NYTimes


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15 replies to this topic

#1 rotuts

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:35 AM

http://www.nytimes.c...r.html?src=dayp

 

Ive seen Geo. Motz show " Hamburger America "  

 

parts of it quite interesting.


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#2 Shel_B

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:48 AM

“A great burger should be like a baked potato, or sashimi. It should taste completely of itself.”

 

Indeed!


.... Shel


#3 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 09:40 AM

“A great burger should be like a baked potato, or sashimi. It should taste completely of itself.”

 

Indeed!

 

A real adjustment, coming to Ontario.  They regularly put herbs and things in their burgers.   Got a hamburger at a Greek diner and it had dill, garlic and feta in it -- served with mustard, ketchup  on a bun. Blech.  The dueling English and  Irish pubs down the street put their own "secret herbs" in theirs.  And all burgers have to be cooked to well done.  So I've learned not to order a burger here unless it's coated in bacon and blue cheese or some such to mask the flavors.  If I wanted a meatball on a bun, I'd order it. 

 

Our son's Canadian girlfriend was amazed when she came to dinner at our house and had a handmade burger with only SALT in the meat.  She said she'd never understood why people liked hamburgers before.  

 

There is one small chain in Toronto that has "plain" hamburgers -- but pubs and restaurants all seem to think flavoured burgers are the way to go.  Ditto most of the frozen beef patties at the supermarket -- flavoured with soy, garlic and herbs.  



#4 patrickamory

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 08:53 PM

Wow… all the fat phobia in the comments...



#5 Ashen

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 12:58 AM

I am a die hard convert to the smash burger ..      Pics of  a double one I made a few weeks ago. topped with smoked jalapeno havarti and homemade relish.  I needed a roll of paper towels and a carpet steamer for my beard afterwards. 

 

GEDC4512_zpsf62d4a94.jpg

 

 

GEDC4514_zpsc13b3d1d.jpg


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#6 dcarch

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 02:58 AM

To me, a burger with all kinds of stuff on it, in it, is a wonderful burger, of course assuming using the right recipes.

 

It is like a lady with makeup on, in a seductive gown.

 

That said, nothing wrong with a naked burger.

 

dcarch 



#7 Tri2Cook

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 03:40 AM

“A great burger should be like a baked potato, or sashimi. It should taste completely of itself.”

 

Indeed!


Agreed. I've met a couple of exceptions that I enjoyed but as a novelty, not a preference. In general, for me, a burger gets salt and pepper. If I want meatloaf, I'll make meatloaf... but not in burger form.


 


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#8 rlibkind

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 07:54 AM

Most important point in NYT article (because I agree with it): stick to chuck (80% my ideal), no need for a "gourmet" mix with brisket, short ribs, etc.

Edited by rlibkind, 26 June 2014 - 07:54 AM.

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#9 rotuts

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 08:52 AM

I tend to agree

 

there was another show w  Geo. Motz.  'Burger Land"  I thiink if was

 

travelled all over and had various local burgers.

 

interesting if if comes around your way.

 

probably a cable show.



#10 smokinjack

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 02:52 PM

Ashen,
That burger looks great..Not over worked when forming.The link below is similar.
I recently bought a 1/2 lb of sirloin and 1/2 lb chuck from a organic free range meat market that uses local beef.
Ground it up and cooked like Adam Perry Lang on the Big Green Egg .We thought they were juicy and delicious. Something about cooking on a flat griddle.
Here's the link.

http://www.adamperry...griddled-onions
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#11 scubadoo97

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Posted 13 April 2015 - 04:14 PM

This post and responses to it have been moved from Cooking axiom or not? On pressing burgers while they cook.


 

While you'll lose some small amount of juice and fat by pressing, it's not going to be substantial unless you're pressing way too hard. The bigger issue is that pressing on burgers doesn't do anything helpful for you and will only harm the texture of the burger by making it more dense. Unless you're making smash burgers, don't press on them; it doesn't help and it can only hurt the end product. If you're having problems with the burger making contact with a pan or griddle, you're not using enough fat to fry them. Add some tallow, butter, or oil to the pan and resist the urge to press down.

LOve smash burgers.


Edited by Mjx, 17 April 2015 - 11:58 PM.
Note added.


#12 Doofa

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 12:33 AM

May I ask, what is a "smash burger" I have only had experience of UK burgers and they are just too hideous to mention.



#13 btbyrd

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 12:19 PM

May I ask, what is a "smash burger" I have only had experience of UK burgers and they are just too hideous to mention.

 

Smash burgers are made by placing patties on a very hot griddle (or very wide pan) and then smashing them super-thin with a large, heavy spatula. They're usually served with two patties per bun. The goal is a very thin burger with lots and lots of brown crispy crust (and almost nothing else). Kenji wrote a great Serious Eats article on making smash burgers at home. It's a delicious style of burger.



#14 FeChef

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Posted 17 April 2015 - 04:38 PM

Smash burgers are made by placing patties on a very hot griddle (or very wide pan) and then smashing them super-thin with a large, heavy spatula. They're usually served with two patties per bun. The goal is a very thin burger with lots and lots of brown crispy crust (and almost nothing else). Kenji wrote a great Serious Eats article on making smash burgers at home. It's a delicious style of burger.

I prefer this type of burger over any other type. My train of thought is that if i want juicy beef, i would rather have a juicy sirloin steak over a juicy sirloin burger. I also dont like eating a beef ball on "pink dough" So i'll take a double patty ground chuck smash burger please...dont forget the pickles.


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#15 Norm Matthews

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 05:49 AM

I recall once on a TV show where a famous British chef who likes to yell and cuss went around and "saved" failing restaurants, gave one place a hamburger sandwich recipe that sounded more like a meatloaf sandwich. 



#16 Norm Matthews

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Posted 18 April 2015 - 05:56 AM

There is a restaurant in Salina Kansas that is around 80 (+) years old that makes sliders exclusively.  They put some diced onions on the grill, toss a small meatball on top, smash it quite flat, poke holes in it with the back end of the spatula and cook it. They sell them by the bagful.  About 10 years ago a new owner bought the place and replaced the grill.  He had so many complaints that they had to go to the dump, find the old grill and re-install it. 


Edited by Norm Matthews, 18 April 2015 - 05:57 AM.

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