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Need a new sandwich bread

Bread

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39 replies to this topic

#31 CatPoet

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:45 AM

That happens, I am guessing the plain flour I am using right now, absorb  alot of  water, i  noticed when i baked cookies  today.  

 

I hope it works.

 

Yesterday i tried a white bread recipe my Scottish  mother in law  bake , if i had added all of the flour it had been a brick.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#32 gfron1

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:56 AM

Just pulled mine out of the oven.  Very yummy.  Almost taste like an American biscuit with a rye background.  Not sure if this will be my new sandwich bread but I'm sure going to use them at home - very easy and fast recipe.  Thanks!


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#33 CatPoet

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 10:19 AM

This is a common recipe for  sandwich bread in   Old fashion Swedish  sandwich shops.  But then they make  the big one and divided it in half  or quarters and then half again and you can buy either top or bottom. A place  near buy does a  Chef sandwich which is either a whole big cake bottom or top with all the  sandwich stuff they have.


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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#34 DianaM

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 07:08 PM

gfron1, could you please post the final ingredient quantities you've used? And did you make the hålkakor, or the scored/break-apart version?

#35 CatPoet

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 12:09 AM

gfron: Next time  try adding bread spice  or just  ground caraway or ground dill seeds.   

 

I have bread spice in mine for Christmas, it  work so well with the Christmas food.

 

My friend who is over used to be baker and  he said if you want fluffier add 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar or  baking ammonia ( this stinks but only when baking). 


Edited by CatPoet, 29 June 2014 - 12:10 AM.

Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#36 Smithy

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 01:50 PM

I called my father, he said this   the only amount of flour that set in stone i rye, the plain flour  can be up to 1 kilo, it all depends on where it has grown and  the same goes with the rye,  So dont  stare at the amounts, just work the dough until it feels soft,  pliable and elastic.  After you made it the first time, you will know how much you need in the future.

 

You can add  1-2 tablespoon of  ground bread spice  (1/3 fennel , 1/3 aniseed , 1/3 caraway ).

 

And I noticed today what a different  it was to bake  with a thunderstorm, the first stage of the dough it was more like a soft  soup/porridge then the hard porridge I got yesterday.  The dough is lighter and much more a live.

 

Why does the thunderstorm matter?  Do you know?  


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#37 CatPoet

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 10:46 PM

Smithy, I am guessing the  quick changes of temperature and moisture could be the problem.  All I know it got weird.


Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you,  But blue mold will kill me.


#38 cakewalk

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:53 AM

... but I find Madison's recipes better written and more reliable. Madison's other cookbooks contain bread recipes that are worth checking out, especially in Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone.

 

I've had this book for years and have enjoyed cooking from it, but I never paid attention to her baked goods. The other day I made her whole wheat bread, and I'm very pleased with it, it's very nice for sandwiches. I slice the loaves and then freeze the slices. Next time I'm going to try part of the dough in my Pullman loaf pan, without the lid. (Or maybe even with the lid. I love the shape of the Pullman.) Also next time, I think the sponge can use less yeast, and I'd try something other than molasses for the bit of sweetness. But it's a nice WW sandwich loaf. Thanks for the pointer.



#39 LindaK

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 08:02 AM

Are you familiar with Anadama bread?  It's a soft but hearty sandwich bread, slight nutty from the addition of fine cornmeal and slightly sweet from molasses (which you can adjust to taste). It's delicious and pairs well with just about anything.  Keeps and freezes well too.

 

There are some mentions of it in these previous topics, but it's easy to find recipes online.  

 

 

http://forums.egulle...the-bread-topic

http://forums.egulle...ce-by-reinhart/

 

 


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#40 cakewalk

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 11:05 AM

Are you familiar with Anadama bread?  It's a soft but hearty sandwich bread, slight nutty from the addition of fine cornmeal and slightly sweet from molasses (which you can adjust to taste). It's delicious and pairs well with just about anything.  Keeps and freezes well too.

 

There are some mentions of it in these previous topics, but it's easy to find recipes online.  

 

 

http://forums.egulle...the-bread-topic

http://forums.egulle...ce-by-reinhart/

Thanks for the links. I've made Anadama, I think with Reinhart's recipe, but it's been a while. I've been playing around with sourdough, so yeast recipes have sort of fallen by the wayside. Time to take another look. I laughed out loud when I saw how quickly the yeasted sponge rose (and even bubbled, like soup in a cauldron), I'd become so used to the v-e-r-y slow-motion of sourdough.







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