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Cooking from "Jerusalem: A Cookbook"

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#31 SobaAddict70

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 07:16 AM

yup, that's the filfel chuma from the carrot salad post. a little goes a long way.

#32 SobaAddict70

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 10:59 AM

I'll be making the fried cauliflower tonight, but having reviewed the recipe (and also because two other dishes tonight will have fried components), I'll be making a couple of tweaks. I'm planning on roasting the cauliflower instead (because who can say "no" to roasted cauliflower, an eGullet classic?); in addition, I'll be subbing regular yogurt instead of the Greek yogurt because it's what I have on hand.

Next week I will be in San Francisco visiting my partner. He does have the book (and "Plenty" as well) but he's never made anything from it, so that will be a treat. You might say that all of my efforts thus far have been a dress rehearsal. :wink:

Edited by SobaAddict70, 20 June 2014 - 11:01 AM.


#33 Smithy

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 12:27 PM

I'm looking forward to that, Soba.

 

I'm presently working on some of the leftovers of the root vegetable slaw about which I posted a couple of nights ago.  The slaw isn't any softer than it was on the first night (translation: the beet matchsticks are more 'tough' than 'crisp').  I think this means that either younger roots or smaller pieces are needed.  The flavors are better, now that the dressing and the vegetables have had a chance to mingle.  nakji, take special note: I see I posted once that Greek yogurt might have been a poor substitute for labneh, and in the next post said it was fine.  I'm using it now, and it's a fine substitute.  Sour cream, on the other hand, takes the salad in the wrong direction IMO.


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#34 Anna N

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Posted 20 June 2014 - 01:02 PM

I'm looking forward to that, Soba.
 
I'm presently working on some of the leftovers of the root vegetable slaw about which I posted a couple of nights ago.  The slaw isn't any softer than it was on the first night (translation: the beet matchsticks are more 'tough' than 'crisp').  I think this means that either younger roots or smaller pieces are needed.  The flavors are better, now that the dressing and the vegetables have had a chance to mingle.  nakji, take special note: I see I posted once that Greek yogurt might have been a poor substitute for labneh, and in the next post said it was fine.  I'm using it now, and it's a fine substitute.  Sour cream, on the other hand, takes the salad in the wrong direction IMO.


Smithy,

A Japanese (Benriner) mandoline is a lot cheaper and easier to store than a food processor and its julienne blade should do the job. You would still need to watch out for your fingers though.
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#35 SobaAddict70

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 07:43 AM

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1/2 head cauliflower, broken into florets, seasoned with olive oil, sea salt and black pepper, then roasted at 350 F for 35-40 minutes.

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About halfway through the roasting process, I stirred in about 1 tablespoon minced scallion.

BTW, all of the proportions are off in this post compared to those called for in the recipe since (1) I'm cooking for one person and (2) I detest leftovers. Apart from the roasting, the proportions and the substitution of yogurt instead of Greek yogurt, the recipe is as written.

The recipe instructs you to fry the cauliflower and the scallions in separate batches. Another advantage of doing it this way is that while the cauliflower is roasting, I can prep the tahini dressing.

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1/4 cup tahini and 1 crushed garlic clove

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1/4 cup chopped flat-leaf parsley + a similar quantity of chopped mint leaves

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to that mixture, add 1/3 cup yogurt, the juice of half a lemon and 1 teaspoon grated lemon zest and 1 teaspoon pomegranate molasses. mix well. if the dressing is too thick, add enough water so that the mixture becomes the consistency of honey.

once the cauliflower is done, fold the dressing into the cauliflower and mix well. taste for salt and black pepper. spoon cauliflower onto shallow bowls, top with additional chopped herbs and a drop or two of pomegranate molasses. serve at once.

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Cauliflower with tahini, pomegranate molasses and mint (page 60).

Time: About 50 minutes, including prep.
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#36 Anna N

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:22 AM

How was the cauliflower? Would you make it again?
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#37 chefmd

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:29 AM

I had to google filfel chums (lots of fun with autocorrect). It appears to be delicious. Soba, did you like it? What would you use it on other than carrot salad?

#38 chefmd

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:29 AM

Autocorrected again. I meant filfel chuma.

#39 SobaAddict70

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:36 AM

How was the cauliflower? Would you make it again?


Absolutely, but I'd cut back on the proportions of the dressing.

#40 SobaAddict70

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:40 AM

I had to google filfel chums (lots of fun with autocorrect). It appears to be delicious. Soba, did you like it? What would you use it on other than carrot salad?


I'd use it for anything savory -- whisked into scrambled eggs, or into mayonnaise.

The fried tomatoes (see above) had a teaspoon stirred in.

#41 patrickamory

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 09:49 AM

The fried tomatoes look delicious - added to my list.


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#42 nakji

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:54 PM

That looks gorgeous. The dressing is what really appeals, though. I wonder if it would work on potatoes, as well?


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#43 SobaAddict70

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 04:59 PM

That looks gorgeous. The dressing is what really appeals, though. I wonder if it would work on potatoes, as well?


Probably, but you might have to play around with the proportions in the recipe. I needed to dial back on the garlic and tahini.

I've noticed that Ottolenghi really amps up those ingredients in these recipes. I frequently find myself trying to lighten things.

#44 SobaAddict70

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 08:44 PM

I can't leave well enough alone; I just adore this cookbook.

I only wish that "Plenty" grabbed me more; I'm curious about his third book, "Ottolenghi".

Anyway, part of tonight's dinner was

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Wild and basmati rice, with spiced chickpeas, crispy fried onions and herbs

The recipe for this is from page 106.

There are five major components to this dish: the rices, the chickpeas, the onion, the herbs and the dried fruit. I subbed dried cranberries for the currants because it's what I had on hand (but I reduced the amount because dried cranberries are sweeter than currants to begin with). I subbed fennel fronds and fennel stems for the dill, and panch phoron for the curry powder.

Prepare basmati rice and wild rice according to package directions. I ignored Ottolenghi's instructions in the cookbook. As someone who was born with the rice cooking gene, :wink: I don't bother with cookbooks in that respect.

Next, warm some olive oil in a pan and add cumin seed and curry powder. I used panch phoron instead for textural contrast. I understand that Ottolenghi is going for a slightly spicy undertone here; I suppose next time I'll use garam masala or filfel chuma. (I have a jar of garam masala somewhere in my spice cabinet that I made a while ago.)

Add your chickpeas and a pinch of salt once the spices have bloomed in the oil. Cook for a couple of minutes and you should end up with something like this:

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The rest of the recipe is fairly straightforward.

* Chop your herbs and have them at the ready.

* Make the crispy fried onions (thinly sliced onion tossed in AP flour, then fried in batches in oil); the next time I make this dish, I definitely switch to slow-cooked onion in olive oil for about 25-30 minutes over low heat or until the onions caramelize and become golden brown. I prefer them that way.

* If using currants, you can leave them as is or plump them by soaking them in boiling water for 20 minutes. Drain, then use as needed.

Once the rices are ready, combine in a large mixing bowl, then add the chickpeas, onion, herbs and dried fruit; mix well. Taste for salt and pepper, then serve immediately.

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#45 SobaAddict70

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 08:55 PM

As a side note, I think it's really funny just how many recipes are vegan. A big plus in my book.
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#46 Smithy

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 08:56 PM

It all looks beautiful, Soba. Thanks for this information. I'll have to renew my library loan to continue cooking on this topic myself, but if you keep it up I may end up making the purchase. ;-)
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#47 SobaAddict70

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:10 PM

It all looks beautiful, Soba. Thanks for this information. I'll have to renew my library loan to continue cooking on this topic myself, but if you keep it up I may end up making the purchase. ;-)


It's not going to happen this week, but when I get back from my vacation, I'll be looking into making some of the desserts. I'm curious about the clementine cake, for instance.

#48 ambra

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:58 PM

Just curious: I absolutely love the mejadra, but I did find it somewhat overseasoned. I think half the seasoning would have been better. Does anyone agree or have I just become too delicate in my old age? :)  I also toned down the seasoning for the lamb kawarma.



#49 Alex

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 11:25 AM

Absolutely, but I'd cut back on the proportions of the dressing.

 

A request from someone who bought this book today: Could you tell me how to develop sufficient self-control to keep from eating most (or all) of the roasted cauliflower before it's dressed?


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#50 SobaAddict70

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 11:56 AM

A request from someone who bought this book today: Could you tell me how to develop sufficient self-control to keep from eating most (or all) of the roasted cauliflower before it's dressed?



Magic? :wink:

I might have time to make the roasted cauliflower salad tomorrow night depending on whether I manage to finish some leftovers tonight.

#51 Anna N

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Posted 25 June 2014 - 03:26 PM

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No sign of my ancho chilies so I used a couple of chile de arbol and I was grateful to have some Christopher Ranch pre-peeled garlic. Hope I remember to toss it in the cooler on Friday morning.


Edited by Mjx, 25 June 2014 - 11:01 PM.
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#52 Katie Meadow

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 07:35 AM

This is a subjective question, but do those of you who have cooked from Jerusalem and Plenty find that the recipes in Jerusalem are a bit more accessible? I don't have either book, but have perused Plenty and just reading the recipes and lists of ingredients made me tired. 

 

Last night I made Swiss Chard Fritters with Feta, which I believe is from Jerusalem. It was fantastic, and not overly fussy. I didn't have the same herbs as listed, but used what I had on hand-- dill and chives. 



#53 MikeHartnett

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 08:19 AM

I'd say Jerusalem is more accessible for sure. It's not entirely traditional, but the traditional base means more common ingredients. That said, Plenty is one of my all time favorite cookbooks, and while the ingredient lists can be a bit crazy, they're worth it.

#54 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 07:00 PM

I read Plenty after reading Jerusalem.  I haven't really cooked from either, but I found Jerusalem much more inviting.



#55 &roid

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 02:54 PM

I love this book, it's up there with his first one, maybe even better - don't think I've made an Ottolenghi recipe I don't like yet.

 

On Friday evening (in preparation for a very meat-heavy BBQ day on saturday) we had the fried tomatoes, the spiced fish kebabs and some tabouleh:

 

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I found a really nice (for the supermarket) fillet of cod so decided to do it as a whole piece rather than kebabs, and I'm glad I did.  The spice paste is really flavourful and goes really well with simply grilled fish.

 

The fried tomatoes are a big hit, very very easy to make - note for next time, when the book says 1.5cm thick slices, it really means it - I got a bit carried away and made some a lot slimmer than this, they just turned to mush in the pan.

 

The tabouleh was great - though there was a bit more bulgar than I would normally like, will make sure I weigh the parsley properly next time.


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#56 Anna N

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 03:26 PM

Up north we are cooking from Jerusalem

http://forums.egulle...-3#entry1975522
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#57 SobaAddict70

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 04:48 PM

I read Plenty after reading Jerusalem.  I haven't really cooked from either, but I found Jerusalem much more inviting.


Many of the recipes from Jerusalem require things that you can make in advance. Ottolenghi mentions that if you don't have any pipelchuma, that harissa can be subbed for example (which itself can be either homemade or store-bought). He does list substitutions, so ultimately it depends on how much effort you want to exert.

I didn't get to do any cooking from Jerusalem while I was in SF, that is, apart from a dish of fried tomatoes with garlic (the non-spicy version) I made for my partner. It was a hit.

B will be in NYC in late August; that's awesomesauce because then it will be eggplant season and just in time for maqluba.

Edited by SobaAddict70, 06 July 2014 - 04:50 PM.


#58 Anna N

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 03:37 PM

Tonight we enjoyed Chicken with Arak and Clementines

http://forums.egulle...chen/?p=1976538
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#59 SobaAddict70

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 05:18 PM

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Preserved limes

This is a variation on the recipe Ottolenghi gives on page 303 for preserved lemons.

4 limes, quartered
4 tablespoons sea salt
2 tablespoons granulated sugar
1/2 tablespoon chopped thyme
1/2 cup lime juice
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil

This will sit in a cupboard for one week and be gently shaken each day, then transferred to the fridge for three more weeks.

I picked up a tip on the inclusion of sugar from a friend last night; it makes the brining liquid more palatable if one were to use it in savory things like a tagine or a vinaigrette.
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#60 BeeZee

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Posted 13 July 2014 - 05:54 PM

Soba, I added sugar to some preserved lemons and I have found it enables the juice to work well as a dressing addition. The lemons which I cut into smaller pieces, are good for bloody marys, too.
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