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Cooking rice: pressure cooker, rice cooker, donabe, or stovetop?


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#1 Franci

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:59 PM

I was reading about Donabe for cooking rice (a video for you if you are interested  ) and was wondering about the difference in result vs pressured cooked rice,  rice cooker rice or stovetop rice. 

 

I generally cook my rice with a pressure cooker and usually I have a better and more consistent result than simply cooking on the stovetop. I never used a rice cooker and cannot compare.

 

 



#2 liuzhou

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 05:02 PM

For many years I have used rice cookers and swear by them. They are consistent, virtually foolproof and hold the done rice at serving temperature over the time of a long relaxed meal.

 

However, they do take up counter space, so I'd say the choice rather depends on how often you cook rice. I do so almost everyday (sometimes more than once a day) so the convenience outweighs any slight inconvenience.


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#3 Shel_B

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 07:28 PM

When I want perfect rice, I bake it, and have found an excellent technique that works consistently.  When I read about the technique and got the recipe, it was suggested that baking in some ways emulates a rice cooker.  I don't know about that as I've never used a rice cooker, but baking means I don't need extra equipment taking up my limited counter and storage space.  Have you considered baking your rice?


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#4 Franci

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 07:52 PM

Sure, baking rice is something I used to do in cooking school for rice pilaf. But I prefer the pressured cook rice, easier and more versatile. I can make sticky rice, sushi rice, risotto, pilaf. I was curious to know if someone can compare pressure cooked rice vs rice cooker vs donabe

#5 liuzhou

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 08:13 PM

 

 I was curious to know if someone can compare pressure cooked rice vs rice cooker vs donabe

 

I've never used or experienced donabe cooked rice, so can't comment on that.

 

However, although I don't use a pressure cooker myself, I usually eat with friends at least once a week and they use a pressure cooker. To be honest I very much doubt that, in a blind test,  I would be able to detect the difference between that and rice cooker rice. To me they are the same.



#6 KennethT

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 08:20 AM

How do you use a pressure cooker to make sticky rice? I am assuming that by "sticky rice" you mean glutinous rice, which is typically soaked for several hours and then steamed for about 15 minutes.

#7 Norm Matthews

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:14 AM

I recall several years ago Nobu did a guest appearance on Martha Stewart show and she asked him how to cook rice in a saucepan. He showed her.  Then she asked "Is that how you do it at your restaurant?" He said "No.  We use a rice cooker"

 

My ex is Korean.  She used a rice cooker every day at our restaurant and had one at home.  After 30 some years, I finally replaced it last month. I would not think about trying to cook rice any other way.



#8 paulraphael

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:20 AM

There's overlap, since some rice cookers are themselves pressure cookers.

 

I use a pressure cooker for rice, and like the results a lot. I also the stovetop, especially when Im not sure how much water the rice is going to need. Being able to see what's going on helps to adapt if I've guessed wrong. 

 

I've used my girlfriend's rice cooker several times, and have a hard time with it. It's not a good one ... kind of the worst of all worlds. It's nothing like the high-end, fuzzy logic rice cookers that people say give them perfect rice every time. These seem ideal if you make rice often enough to justify a dedicated appliance.

 

My favorite use of the pressure cooker for rice is risotto. It cooks in 7 to 9 minutes without stirring and is as good as anything I've made traditionally. I think the method for Japanese sticky rice would be similar, except you rinse the sticky rice for a long time first.



#9 liuzhou

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:32 AM

 

There's overlap, since some rice cookers are themselves pressure cookers.

 

For example?



#10 btbyrd

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:33 AM

I use a rice cooker because it produces great results and you don't have to keep an eye on it. Morimoto uses one on Iron Chef whenever he makes rice and Dave Arnold swears by his. Not saying you can't do it other ways, but if you cook a lot of rice and have the space, rice cookers are the way to go.



#11 Anna N

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:38 AM

I know Franci can speak for herself but I understood her question to be what would be the advantage of cooking rice in a donabe versus cooking it another way. I suspect she doesn't need any help cooking rice. If you look at the video she linked to it seems to suggest that this is a superior way to cook rice. Anyway let's wait for Franci to pop in.
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#12 rotuts

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:39 AM

Ive been using a Fuzzy logic rice cooker for perhaps 15 years.  Its a National, which nowdays i think is panasonic

 

i love it.  it has several settings, and does an excellent job of cooking w milk, which is why I got it:  for steel cut oatmeal 

 

no fuss no scorched milk

 

my version also does "Kamado" which crisps the bottom of the rice a la persian style

 

i highly recommend it.   they seem to come in 5 cup and 10 cup.  at least then  very little difference in price

 

I got the 10 up as the extra space is used to add 'mix-ins' after the rice it cooked.

 

consider this book:

 

http://www.amazon.co...k/dp/1558326677

 

it was on display at my library and after reading it I ordered on

 

at the time the internet was young, and I got it from Toronto, chinatown there.   i had to call when the 'children' were at home to understand the shipping etc.

 

you get perfect "whatever you put in there" every time.  one button  

 

then can do something else.   it also keeps rice warm


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#13 Norm Matthews

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 10:04 AM

I just watched the video and noticed that short grain rice was used. Here in the US, most people use long grain rice which would have a different texture and taste. (I personally prefer medium grain rice.) I have some experience with pottery and am pretty sure that that cooker will crack if not used with a gas flame.  A regular electric coil stove will likely heat the bottom to much while the upper part stayed cool enough to cause thermal shock.  I am not sure about a flat glass top electric stove though.  It seemed to take longer to prepare rice with this cooker than it would with a good quality rice cooker which is about 20 minutes from start to eating.


Edited by Norm Matthews, 06 June 2014 - 10:05 AM.


#14 Franci

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 10:46 AM

How do you use a pressure cooker to make sticky rice? I am assuming that by "sticky rice" you mean glutinous rice, which is typically soaked for several hours and then steamed for about 15 minutes.

 

Yes, I mean sticky rice, which I soak for at least 2 hours. I put some water in the pressure cooker, a trivet and my rice in a squared bowl. Cook on high for 12 minutes (in a normal steamer, I usually cook for 20-25 minutes and that is always the timing I read everywhere on glutinous rice.

 

For example?

 

You have products like Instantpot that works as a rice cooker, pressure cooker, slow cooker, yogurt maker, etc.

 

I know Franci can speak for herself but I understood her question to be what would be the advantage of cooking rice in a donabe versus cooking it another way. I suspect she doesn't need any help cooking rice. If you look at the video she linked to it seems to suggest that this is a superior way to cook rice. Anyway let's wait for Franci to pop in.

 

Thanks Anna. I'm pretty happy about my rice. My Chinese husband doesn't care much for rice, so we eat it maybe a couple times a week, I cannot justify buying a rice cooker. The donabe to cook 2 cups rice costs 140$. Wondering if it's just an esthetic question or it really makes a big difference...

And still, even if I'm not going to buy a rice cooker tomorrow- I'd prefer a slicer and a dehydrator to take some of my counter space- I was interested to know if there is anybody who tried the two cooking methods and what he/she thinks about them.


Edited by Franci, 06 June 2014 - 10:49 AM.


#15 dcarch

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 11:29 AM

I also cook rice with a PC. The nice thing about using a PC is that is is quicker (energy saving) and you can cook again if you find the rice is too firm. Also you will not burn the rice if you have the fire too high.

 

The donabe way is purely aesthetic. The rice knows only heat, it does not know what gives it the heat. It can be stainless steel. clay, aluminum, or any material. I tend to doubt the clay donabe can make rice in 15 minutes, it being a very poor heat conductor. 

 

I don't know what's the purpose of the double covers. You will have one more thing to carry, to break and to clean.

 

dcarch



#16 rotuts

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 11:34 AM

you like your rice as you make it now

 

you dont make a lot of rice

 

you use water + rice,  not milk + rice  (game changer)

 

go with the slicer.

 

and I know that doesn't answer your question, but it might turn your attention back to that slicer instead.



#17 paulraphael

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:19 PM

For example?

This one from Zojirushi. A friend of mine has it and won't shut up out it.



#18 rotuts

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:38 PM

wow

 

 

paulraphael

 

although this does not help are friend Fanci .....

 

this is very interesting to me

 

a bit of time ago, i saw a review   WSJ or NYTimes  re 

 

state of the art rice cooker

 

at that time, there were 1,000 USD + rice cookers only in Japan

 

such as this one.

 

thanks   Ill put the larger of these on my list

 

for when I win the lottery > 250 Mil USD.

 

and no.  I dont look for this

 

but if I spot  > 250 mil, I get one ticket.

 

should I remember.

 

less than 100 mil (USD) is a bit of a head ache.

 

Im pleased the Induction Pressure Rice Cooker has dropped 50 %

 

:biggrin:



#19 Franci

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:43 PM

This one from Zojirushi. A friend of mine has it and won't shut up out it.

 

I was reading a quote from a reviewer, sunshine

 

During hurricane Sandy, I stayed with my friend and found out about this rice cooker. At first I thought she was crazy for spending $800 on a rice cooker. The most I've ever spent was $400.Then when I tasted her rice that night, I was sold. Couldn't go back to my pressure cooker. It changes the quality of your rice and as I mentioned earlier you can adjust the water to change the moisture to your liking in your rice. After eating this rice, I noticed that any restuarant does not compare. To me, this is simply the best!!!

 

it costs more than 400$. If we were serious rice eaters...



#20 rotuts

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 01:52 PM

this is Rice for the Japanese.

 

this is not in any way some sort of slur

 

rice there is different than anywhere else.  if you have the means, or 50 % of those means.

 

its not China, its not India.

 

its  ( and i have been told this by several Japanese Friends:

 

they search out the Terroir.

 

the time, the age etc.

 

if you grew up and studied this, it might make some some sense:

 

Rice + water + heat

 

all of those things would make a bit difference if you can notice it.



#21 andiesenji

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 04:17 PM

We have had some extensive discussion of rice cookers and various methods of cooking rice in the past. 

 

I've been using automatic rice cookers since I saw one demonstrated at the L.A. County fair in the mid to late 1970s - it was before I sold my house in Canoga Park in 1978.  I didn't buy one at the fair but within a few days bought one at the May Co. dept store - they had an extensive "housewares" department.  I think it was a Rival - small - I soon upgraded to a larger one. 

 

I've owned about every type and size available - currently have the Zojirushi IH 10 cup - have not yet "graduated" to the newer model as this one works fine.

Prior to this one, I had a Neuro Fuzzy which I sent to my daughter and she uses it constantly.  I also still have one of the smaller "Micom" and a twenty+ year old regular Automatic (the round one with the flowers that has the locking top.

 

Earlier I had a Panasonic, a Sanyo and a Hitachi - the one with the very LOUD bell.  They all worked beautifully. 


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#22 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 05:37 PM

I don't eat much rice because I don't seem to be able to cook it as well as I would like.  (Although I did have good results with my last batch.)  I've never tried a rice cooker but I can speak to the quality and durability of my ancient Zojirushi bread maker.

 

My question:  can rice makers prepare a small, single person, quantity of rice?  I'd like some rice right now.

 

 

Edit:  I saw on amazon that the 1.8 L makes as little as 1 cup, uncooked.  How about the smaller unit?


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker, 06 June 2014 - 05:46 PM.


#23 liuzhou

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:05 PM

 

can rice makers prepare a small, single person, quantity of rice?

 

Yes, I do it all the time. Around one cup of uncooked rice. That's in a 3L rice cooker.



#24 dcarch

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:08 PM

"---My question:  can rice makers prepare a small, single person, quantity of rice?  I'd like some rice right now.---"

 

With a PC, you can make one spoon of rice.

 

 

dcarch



#25 nickrey

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:36 PM

I use a rice cooker for larger quantities.

 

For rice for two of us, I use the microwave. Rinse rice until clear. Place rice in microwave rice cooker. Add water so that it is one knuckle above the rice.

 

Microwave for 12 minutes on high.

 

Let sit for 8 minutes.

 

Serve.

 

Takes about as long as conventional lost-water cooking technique rice but far less monitoring required.


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#26 liuzhou

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 06:52 PM

 

Takes about as long as conventional lost-water cooking technique rice but far less monitoring required.

 

A rice cooker requires no monitoring.



#27 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 08:43 PM

...and some of us have no microwave.



#28 nickrey

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 08:57 PM

A rice cooker requires no monitoring.

I seem to remember saying that I use a rice cooker for larger quantities.


Edited by nickrey, 06 June 2014 - 08:58 PM.

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#29 liuzhou

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 09:21 PM

liuzhou, on 07 Jun 2014 - 09:52 AM, said:

A rice cooker requires no monitoring.

I seem to remember saying that I use a rice cooker for larger quantities.

 

 

I remember, too. It doesn't make my comment any less true or pertinent, does it?.



#30 nickrey

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Posted 06 June 2014 - 10:49 PM

My rice cooker is a 10 cup Tiger that I used to use it for sous vide cooking. Bigger than your 3 litre cooker. I've never been game to go below the 3 cup minimum the Tiger people specify for this particular cooker. This is one of the reasons I use the microwave for smaller quantities. It's also easier to get out the microwave container in my kitchen and easier to throw it into the dishwasher.

 

One doesn't know others individual circumstances so I mentioned the microwave option as this may better fit the OP's (or others) needs. I rarely see evidence for single best ways of doing things as the environment is likely to be a large determinant of what can be done.


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