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Ice Cream Scoops


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8 replies to this topic

#1 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 12:53 AM

I currently use a Roll Dipper ice cream scoop.  For those following along at home, Roll Dipper is what Zeroll was called in 1953.

 

Zeroll has since improved their alloy and I thought to get one of the newer Zeroll models.  However after investigating the state of the art in ice cream scoops, and after sadly realizing Yukiwa ice cream scoops are apparently not imported into the US, I ordered a Belle-V.

 

While waiting for the Belle-V to arrive, I would love to hear of people's experiences with Roll Dipper, Yukiwa, Belle-V, or other brands.

 

What is the best ice cream scoop?  And why?



#2 Shel_B

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 06:58 AM

Your post caught my attention as I'm starting to look for a scoop, although not primarily for ice cream but for portion control when making cookies, dumplings, etc.

 

Are you using your scoop for ice cream or portion control?  Why do you like the scoops(s) you've mentioned?  I've never heard of the brands you mentioned, but that's to be expected since I've not looked at scoops before.


.... Shel


#3 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 05 June 2014 - 02:06 PM

I use Zeroll for portion control:

 

http://www.webstaura...oz/9922030.html

 

 

Note these are not at all the same scoops as the Zeroll ice cream scoops, which are fluid filled aluminum.  The Zeroll portion control scoops come in many sizes and are NSF.  Pretty frustrating to hack at ice cream.  However I highly recommend Zeroll portion control scoops for drop cookies.  But since these days I don't bake cookies much, I don't have a pressing need for portion control scoops at the moment.  I also have a much loved set of three flour scoops from KAF and a kitty scoop, all of which might warrant their own threads.


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#4 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 01:32 AM

The Belle-V arrived and has now been tested.  However my current ice cream does not get hard as a brick, so perhaps it is not the best test subject.  Anyhow, the Belle-V works.  Here is the Belle-V ready to go:

 

Belle-V.jpg



#5 Blether

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 03:38 AM

What on earth does NSF stand for?  "Not safe for Frangipani"?


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#6 Anna N

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 03:49 AM

What on earth does NSF stand for?  "Not safe for Frangipani"?

l


http://www.nsf-cmi.com
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
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#7 Blether

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 04:23 AM

Ha ha! I just read their "About Us", and I still don't know what it stands for.  I know what it is now, though.  Thanks, Anna.


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#8 Shel_B

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Posted 07 June 2014 - 06:57 AM

What on earth does NSF stand for?  "Not safe for Frangipani"?

 

I asked that same question, without the sarcasm, of Porthos some months back.  As a food preparer it's important for him to use NSF rated cookware and utensils, such as knives.  Our discussion focused on a Victorinox knife I bought, and Porthos said it wasn't NSF rated, which I found odd because another Victorinox knife with the same blade was.  It was explained that NSF rated products will clean up better than non-NSF rated products, and because of the handle material and design of my knife, it couldn't be cleaned and sanitized to the same high standards as a similar knife with a different handle material and design.  In other words, an NSF product is able to be cleaned to a higher, and presumably, healthier standard.  It's not made in such a way that it can harbor germs, food particles, and crud as is possible with no-NSF products.

 

Hope this helps you better understand NSF ... I suspect Porthos and other can provide a clearer, more concise, explanation.


.... Shel


#9 barolo

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 06:59 AM

Ha ha! I just read their "About Us", and I still don't know what it stands for.  I know what it is now, though.  Thanks, Anna.


National Sanitation Foundation
Cheers,
Anne