Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Cooking burgers sous vide, have some questions

Modernist

  • Please log in to reply
128 replies to this topic

#121 scubadoo97

scubadoo97
  • participating member
  • 2,409 posts
  • Location:Dunedin, Florida

Posted 25 January 2015 - 07:46 AM

I tried to do that but failed when there is fat in the meat. For some reason, fat clogs the output tube of the grinder and it cause smearing.

What do you think of the method I am thinking about? Pass the already minced meat through the grinder?


What condition is the cutting blade in? It's possible to sharpen it or replace it if it's in bad shape

#122 Dave W

Dave W
  • participating member
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Colorado

Posted 25 January 2015 - 08:25 AM

Yeah that sounds like a grinder problem. Are you sure you're assembling it correctly?

Running mince back through the grinder is a typical technique for sausage making and it probably wouldn't help your product if it's smearing even on the first pass.

#123 Dave W

Dave W
  • participating member
  • 207 posts
  • Location:Colorado

Posted 25 January 2015 - 11:05 AM

Kostbill if I understand your post right your problem is probably that your grinder has an "output tube" attached. This is a sausage stuffing attachment and pushing mince through one of these with an auger is a typical cause of smear.

Try grinding without the tube into a bowl.
  • ChrisTaylor likes this

#124 kostbill

kostbill
  • participating member
  • 11 posts

Posted 25 January 2015 - 07:11 PM

I don't know if it is possible to sharpen the blade, I will try to see if it possible to replace it.

 

My fault, there is not an output tube, I just don't know how to say it in English. I mean the normal output of my grinder.

 

But, as I was saying, I don't want to pass the meat twice through my grinder. I want to pass the already minced meat from my butcher through my grinder.

I want to do that because when I unpack the minced meat, it is dense and I am thinking that if I pass it through my grinder it will be fluffier.

 

Any ideas?



#125 JoNorvelleWalker

JoNorvelleWalker
  • participating member
  • 2,435 posts
  • Location:New Jersey USA

Posted 25 January 2015 - 07:28 PM

Something I have done successfully, but I don't do it often...

 

Put the meat from your butcher down on a large cutting board and whack at it with a heavy chef's knife.  If it's not clear, I am serious with the suggestion.



#126 scubadoo97

scubadoo97
  • participating member
  • 2,409 posts
  • Location:Dunedin, Florida

Posted 25 January 2015 - 07:32 PM

I lightly pass mine blade and plates flat across a 1000 grit stone on occasion to keep them in shape and true them





http://youtu.be/YdpGq0_bcmg

#127 kostbill

kostbill
  • participating member
  • 11 posts

Posted 26 January 2015 - 01:13 PM

Something I have done successfully, but I don't do it often...

 

Put the meat from your butcher down on a large cutting board and whack at it with a heavy chef's knife.  If it's not clear, I am serious with the suggestion.

I have done that. It gets very tiring very fast!

 

What do you think about maltodextrin and dextrose in the burger to keep it juicy even if doing it medium?



#128 paulraphael

paulraphael
  • participating member
  • 3,189 posts

Posted 12 May 2015 - 12:02 PM

I think I've cracked the texture issue, after trying the idea mentioned a page ago.

 

I'm balancing the meat mix by adding butter (in this case 5% total weight.) The butter gets worked into a compound butter with 0.7% salt and 0.2% black pepper, relative to the weight of the meat. Roll the butter into a small cylinder with plastic wrap and freeze. 

 

When the meat is partially frozen, distribute the various cuts randomly on a tray. Cut the compound butter into small cubes and distribute evenly with the meat. Drop the butter cubes into the grinder along with the meat, striving for an even distribution.

 

Cook S.V. as you normally would. That's it. The result was perfect seasoning, no need for any last-minute seasoning of the patties, and no noticeable toughening from the salt (done without any kind of control; I can't promise there's no change in texture). 

 

That's it. I believe the butter keeps the salt sequestered from the meat proteins long enough to prevent much curing to happen. 

 

I did this with a blend of 1/3 chuck, 1/3 brisket, 1/3 oxtail. Next time I may try shin instead of oxtail (cheaper and easier) and add the marrow to the mix to compensate for the cut's leanness.



#129 JoNorvelleWalker

JoNorvelleWalker
  • participating member
  • 2,435 posts
  • Location:New Jersey USA

Posted 12 May 2015 - 10:46 PM

Tonight for me was a sous vide burger.  Brushed simply with a little liquid smoke.  This fulfills the promise of sous vide.  Convenient, 'cause I bagged and cooked the burgers some while ago.  Charred on the outside, pink on the inside, no gray.  Ten minute dinner.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Modernist