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Introducing myself...from France!


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#1 emelinecannelle

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 05:25 AM

Hi everyone!

I'm Emeline, I'm French and I'm living in France!

I'm currently preparing a research study for the French equivalent of a Master of Arts. My work is based on the use of French loan-words in the lexical field of pastry and dessert. This is why I decided to join this community, in order to have access to samples of dessert names.

However, before finalizing my dissertation paper, I would like to know what YOU think about the use of French loan-words in pastry and dessert field.

 

 

Do you sometimes prefer French loan-words instead of native English words, and if so, why?

Do you use the same terminology when talking to your friends or family (IRL)?

Do you understand the meaning of French loan-words that you use?

 

Such a reflexive feedback would be great in order to compare it to the conclusions drawn from my corpus study :)



#2 gfweb

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 05:47 AM

What do you mean by a "loan word"?



#3 emelinecannelle

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 05:52 AM

Oh sorry, I should have explained it :) I'm so busy in writing my dissertation for months now that I think everyone knows what I'm actually talking about!

More than giving you a definition of a loan-word, I'd rather give some examples if you don't mind!

The following quotations are dessert names taken from this website. I put the French loan-words in bold types.

 

Apple aux bretons

Caramel apple crème brulee

Pistachio madeleines

Pumpkin chiffon mousse

Coffee Walnut Daquoise

 

Those are French words but used in an English dessert name. This what I call loan-words. Is it better or do you need more explanation?



#4 Anna N

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:22 AM

I don't think of these as loan words. They are simply words that have no useful English equivalent.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#5 emelinecannelle

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:55 AM

thank you both for your answers! I'm starting a new topic dedicated to this feedback (here: http://forums.egulle...-dessert-names/) since I'm misusing the "Introduction" forum ;)



#6 Anna N

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:17 AM

thank you both for your answers! I'm starting a new topic dedicated to this feedback (here: http://forums.egulle...-dessert-names/) since I'm misusing the "Introduction" forum ;)


Forgot my manners! Welcome to eG.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

"It either works fine or not, but what the heck. This is bread, not birth control." Susan of Wild Yeast blog
Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog
My 2004 eG Blog

#7 rotuts

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 07:21 AM

well, lets say they are on permanent loan.

 

French words help the food they describe taste a lot better.  


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#8 gfweb

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 08:53 AM

English speakers have a different idea than some other languages about using foreign words.  If the alien word has no English counterpart, eg many French pastries, we simply use the foreign word. Eventually it becomes used enough to be part of the language and is no longer italicized as a foreign word would be...eg frankfurter, hollandaise, mayonnaise.



#9 Smithy

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 09:16 AM

thank you both for your answers! I'm starting a new topic dedicated to this feedback (here: http://forums.egulle...-dessert-names/) since I'm misusing the "Introduction" forum ;)


That's a good move. Welcome, Emeline!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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#10 Blether

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Posted 27 May 2014 - 06:18 PM

Welcome, Emeline. What's the linguist's take on gfweb's point about normalisation of loan words? If I remember right, "en route" and others are recognised as standard English now, and included in the OED (for those on the right-hand-side of the pond).

 

PS did you see the last few posts in the Dinner! 2014 (Part 3) thread ? The proper use of sucs and fond is being questioned, along with the reputation of the CIA.


Edited by Blether, 27 May 2014 - 06:19 PM.

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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#11 Kim Shook

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Posted 29 May 2014 - 04:47 PM

Welcome from me, too, Emeline!  You sound busy!  I'll look forward to hearing about your interests and your food!