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Anchovy Paste: vs Fish Sauce: your thoughts ?


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#1 rotuts

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 01:11 PM

this weeks Test Kitchen had two pasta dishes and I learned a bit on Carbonara that might be helpful

 

they also did Puttanesca and used Anchovy paste, the kind in the tube.

 

i have not used this for many many years.  once maybe at most, preferring the little cans.

 

I havent gotten a can in a long time, using Fish Sauce, initially  3 Crab, now Red Boat.

 

most of each can got tossed, hence the move to FS.

 

Most of my Anchovy use is in C. Salad, but Ill add 1 - 2 drops of RB to the chicken sauce Im making

 

which will use up some of the BBQ Ck dark meat I have ready to chop up and put over rice.

 

Anyone use Tube'd A.Paste ?  brand ? 

 

does this add anything to a dish that R.B. cant ?

 

the texture of the filet is one thing, as we have seen on Eggs recently. but the tube stuff just gets mixed up

 

in the final pasta sauce and I cant seem the rational here for the paste as texture.

 

anyone use Paste where Red Boat might work, where you are looking for texture ?

 

many thanks



#2 SobaAddict70

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 03:33 PM

if you get anchovies in a can, you can preserve them by covering the unused portion in olive oil. just a tip.

the flavor profile is different with fish sauce, and there are different types which have different uses depending on whatever it is you're cooking. well, you could be like some people on this board who are, mmmm, adventurous; fortunately, this planet is a big place. for myself, if it's FS we're talking about, I prefer patis which tends to go better with Filipino food than with something like say, Thai.

#3 Shel_B

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:10 AM

I've been using Red Boat for a while, and when this bottle runs low, I'll pick up some Blis (http://blisgourmet.c...arrel-aged.html).

 

Anchovies vs, anchovy paste:  I much prefer using whole anchovies vs the paste.  I've tried several brands of paste, and while somewhat more convenient than using whole, processed anchovies, I've found the taste somewhat lacking in depth and also somewhat "tinny."  Long ago I stopped using tinned anchovies, and now only use jarred, such as Ortiz, but I sometimes put the anchovies in salads or on pizza, where they remain whole or somewhat chopped.  However, as this article (http://www.seriousea...-olive-oil.html), the brand does not make much difference when used in cooking, such as in a Puttanesca sauce (although when making a Puttanesca, I like to leave some chunks of anchovies in the sauce, and not dissolve the little buggers completely, so in this instance, the brand and packing method does make a difference).

 

You may also want to check out this comparison:  http://www.seriousea...ml?ref=obinsite

 

I do not see fish sauce being used interchangeably with anchovies in recipes.

 

BTW, I am definitely going to try the carbonara recipe.


Edited by Shel_B, 12 May 2014 - 04:17 AM.

.... Shel


#4 rotuts

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 04:14 AM

nice article.  exactly what I was looking for.

 

have to see what TJ's has.

 

thanks



#5 Norm Matthews

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:33 AM

I use tubed anchovy paste for the saltiness, not the fish flavor.  There is a background depth of flavor not found in salt alone.



#6 Shel_B

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:52 AM

I use tubed anchovy paste for the saltiness, not the fish flavor.  There is a background depth of flavor not found in salt alone.

 

What is that background flavor?  Anchovies are used to add or enhance umami.  Is that what your describing?


.... Shel


#7 gfweb

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 08:31 AM


  However, as this article (http://www.seriousea...-olive-oil.html), the brand does not make much difference when used in cooking, such as in a Puttanesca sauce (although when making a Puttanesca, I like to leave some chunks of anchovies in the sauce, and not dissolve the little buggers completely, so in this instance, the brand and packing method does make a difference).

 

You may also want to check out this comparison:  http://www.seriousea...ml?ref=obinsite

 

.

In Kenji I trust.



#8 Norm Matthews

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 07:23 PM

I suppose umami is close a enough definition. The paste adds a salty taste that is kind of muted, but not fishy.  You don't notice the anchovy or salt but it enhances the flavor.  I first used it in a tapenade. 



#9 patrickamory

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Posted 12 May 2014 - 11:41 PM

For those of you in the US (and possibly elsewhere - I just don't know gets imported) - can I recommend Ortiz anchovies in the glass jar?

 

Especially the Ortiz "stilla antigua"?

 

http://www.amazon.co...y/dp/B0076ZQNIA

 

So good - I just had to run into the kitchen and eat some from the jar - they're THAT good...



#10 btbyrd

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 03:14 PM

The Ortiz anchovies are flippin' delicious. Expensive, but worth it if you're going to eat them whole (on a salad, pasta, or pizza).



#11 Norm Matthews

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Posted 13 May 2014 - 04:36 PM

FWIW, Re Fish Sauce.  I have this in my files on historical regional BBQ sauces. It is supposed to be a close facsimile of the original vinegar sauce used in North Carolina. It has no tomato in it. 

 

Note included with the recipe about the fish sauce: It is important to use the Vietnamese nouc mam. Other brands tend to be too salty and fishy to blend with the other ingredients.

 

Also in the notes: In the 1600’s and 1700’s people use a concoction called English Ketchup. It contained clams.  This recipe comes close to duplicating the original recipe used by the early colonists except their sauce contained clams.  Phu Quac replaces the clams in the original recipe.

 

One True Barbecue Sauce

 

16 ounces apple cider vinegar

1 Tablespoon red pepper flakes

1 1/2 Tablespoons Phu Quoc brand nuoc mam*

1 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

 

Allow to stand for a day or two and then used with pulled pork or as a dip. 


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