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#61 liuzhou

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Posted 15 June 2014 - 11:29 PM

I preferred the dishes we got up north in Zhongdian, with their yak and cheese dishes.

 

 

I remember five culinary things from Dali. The local food was not special (and very touristy, even back in 1996-97) but:

 

1) A Chinese New Year's Eve (Spring 1997) traditional Yunnan minority banquet. Lots of Dai and Bai ethnic groups' foods. It was so-so. Some good stuff, but way too much sticky rice in everything. I'm not a big sticky rice fan, which is a bit of a handicap when most of my work is researching the cuisines of devout sticky rice eaters!

 

2) Dali is where I bought my beautiful marble mortar and pestle, which I love more than is reasonable or perhaps even legal in some jurisdictions. It is damned heavy and I had to carry it across China for weeks before getting it back to my kitchen. The Chinese for 'marble' is 大理石 (dà lǐ shí) which literally translates as "Dali Stone".

 

dali mortar and pestle.jpg

 

3) This batik, which I watched being hand made over about three weeks.The young man's patience astonished me. When it was done, he hung it in a back lit frame. Utterly beautiful. I walked past his studio every day for a week thinking "I want that! I need that!", but it was a bit more than I could really afford at the time. Eventually a friend said to me, "If you don' t buy it, you'll regret it forever." She was right, so I did.

 

batik.jpg

 

4) It was the first time I saw a donkey's head parked on the trestle table market stall to advertise which particular meat the was vendor's speciality. 

 

5) The best brownie I ever ate. (Technically, that should be "brownies". I got through a load of them.")

But I digress. I am meeting an old friend next week who is from Yunnan. I don't know if she is much of a cook, but I know she is much of an eater. I shall interrogate her about Yunnan sweet and sour and report back. If she has anything to add.


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#62 Smithy

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 04:29 AM

I'm glad, for your sake, that you bought both the mortar and pestle set and the batik. I'm glad, for our sakes, you showed them to us. They are beautiful!

Do you remember what made those brownies so special? I had some a couple of days ago that were more fudgy and chocolatey than any I've ever had before, and they're in the running for my personal favorites.
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#63 liuzhou

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:25 AM

 

Do you remember what made those brownies so special?

 

They were just the right amount of moist, sticky without being cloying, chocolately without being just chocolate and sweet without being sugary. Perfectly balanced



#64 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 04:07 AM

The "A BIte of China" exploitation machines is churning out book after book. I think I have the best ones,  I only give the new ones cursory glances.

 

However, today I saw this.

 

Cover6.jpg

 

It is a surprising twist on the original. Instead of being "A Bite of China", it's "A Bite of the World".

 

Organised into five sections - Asia, Europe, the Americas, Oceania and Africa - it gives one or two recipes from various countries. The number of entries per country is just bizarre. In the Asia selection alone, Korea gets 9 recipes, Japan 8, but India only gets two and one of those is a cup of tea! Similarly, Turkey, a great food nation, only gets a cup of coffee!

 

Many of the choices are obvious and even clichéd, but the book was cheap and the concept amused me. Of course, it's way too short at 220 pages to do the subject any justice, but it's interesting to see how China looks at the culinary world. After all, we look at Chinese cuisine so closely.

 

Here is the Asian section. I'll follow up with the others.

 

(I'm sure some of the translations could be improved a lot, but I'm working from Chinese into English via languages I often don't know, so it gets a bit difficult. Any suggestions for improvements will be warmly received. Apologies for any outright errors.)

 

 

Asia

 

Japan

 

味噌汤 Miso Soup /010

寿司和饭团 Sushi and Rice Rolls /012

便当 Bento  /014

黄瓜茄子渍物 Cucumber and Eggplant Tsukemono /016

什锦大虾天妇罗 Mixed Prawn Tempura /018

寿喜烧 Sukiyaki (Japanese Hotpot) /020

亲子盖浇饭 Rice with Chicken and Egg (literally Parent and Child Covered Rice) /022

日式咖喱鸡肉饭 Japanese Style Curried Chicken with Rice /024

蛋包饭 Omuraisu - Omelette stuffed with Fried Rice served with tomato ketchup /026

茶泡饭 Chazuke /028

章鱼烧 Takoyaki - Deep-fried Battered Octopus Balls /030

拉面, 乌冬面和荞麦面 3 recipes for Ramen, Udon Noodles and Buckwheat Noodles  /032

 

Korea

 

腌辣白菜 Kimchi /034

朝鲜冷面 North Korean Cold Noodles /036

紫菜包饭 Seaweed Wrapped Rice (Korean Sushi) /038

石锅拌饭 Sand Pot Mixed Vegetables with Rice /040

泡菜饼 Pickled Vegetable Cake /042

大酱汤 Doenjang Jjigae /044

炒年糕 Tteokbokki /046

南瓜粥Pumpkin Porridge  /048

韩国烤肉 South Korean Grilled Meat /050

 

Mongolia

 

手把肉 Hand Pulled Mutton /052

蒙古奶茶和炒米 Mongolian Milk Tea with Millet  /054

 

Nepal

 

达尔巳 Dal bhat  /056

 

India

 

咖喱羊肉 Curried Mutton /058

印度奶茶 Indian Milk Tea /060

 

Maldives

 

咖喱虾煲 Curried Shrimp /062

 

Vietnam

 

越南春卷 Vietnamese Spring Rolls /064

越南牛肉河粉 Phở /066

越南咖啡 Vietnamese Coffee /068

 

Cambodia

 

芭蕉叶蒸鱼 Banana Leaf Steamed Fish  /070

 

Thailand

 

冬阴功汤 Tom Yum Shrimp Soup /072

绿咖喱椰汁鸡 Green Curry Coconut Chicken/074

菠萝饭 Pineapple Rice /076

泰式柠檬虾 Thai Style Lemon Shrimp /078

咖喱蟹 Curried Crab /080

 

Burma

 

鱼汤米线 Fish Soup with Rice Noodles /082

 

Malaysia

 

肉骨茶 Bak kut teh /084

椰浆饭 Coconut Rice /086

 

Singapore

 

海南鸡饭 Hainan Chicken with Rice /088

功沙 Seafood Noodles  /090

 

Indonesia

 

巳东牛肉 Beef Rendang /092

串烧印尼沙茶 Grilled Chicken Skewers with Satay Sauce /094

印尼虾片 Indonesian Shrimp Crackers /096

 

Philippines

 

什锦水果刨冰 Mixed Fruit Sorbet /098

 

Iran

 

红花米饭 Saffron Rice /100

 

Iraq

 

玛斯古夫烤鱼 Masgouf /102

 

Turkey

 

土耳其咖啡 Turkish Coffee /104

 

Syria

芝麻着鹰嘴豆 Hummus /106

 

Israel

 

鹰嘴豆饼 Falafel /108

 

U.A.E.

 

阿拉伯沙拉 Arabian Salad /110

 

Europe next.


Edited by liuzhou, 21 June 2014 - 04:10 AM.


#65 nakji

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 04:22 AM

"Arabian Salad"?



#66 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 05:08 AM

 

"Arabian Salad"?

 

20 Cherry Tomatoes
Half an Onion
One Cucumber
10 Mint Leaves
1 Lemon
1 teaspoon Black Pepper
1 teaspoon salt
Olive Oil
Celery
2 spoonfuls yoghurt

 

The instructions run to 5 steps but basically just say "wash and mix". Chinese recipes are seldom packed with detail.


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#67 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 05:47 AM

Europe

Russia

罗宋汤 Borscht /114
俄式酸黄瓜 Russian Style Pickled Cucumber /116

Greece

羊奶酪沙拉 Feta Cheese Salad /118

Italy

番茄肉酱意面 Spaghetti Bolognese /120
薄脆比萨 Pizza /122
牛肝菌烩饭 Mushroom (Porcini) Risotto /124
香草冰淇淋 Vanilla Ice Cream /126
提拉米苏 Tiramisu /128

Spain

海鲜饭 Paella /130
火腿芝士面包片 Ham and Cheese Sandwich /132
土豆煎蛋奄列 Spanish Omelette /134
桑格里亚酒 Sangria /136

Portugal

香煎鳕鱼 Fried Cod /138
葡式蛋挞 Portuguese Egg Tart/140

United Kingdom

英式早餐 English Breakfast /142
英式下午茶 English Afternoon Tea /144
炸鱼薯条 Fish and Chips /148
牛肉腰子派 Steak and Kidney Pie /150
约克郡布丁 Yorkshire Pudding /152

France

红酒炖牛肉 Beef Bourguignon /154
法式洋葱汤 French Onion Soup /156
樱桃蜜汁鸭胸 Cherry Duck Breast /158
可丽饼 Crepes /160
长棍面包 Baguettes /162
乌卡龙 Macarons /164

Ireland

黑啤炖牛肉 Guinness Beef /166

Germany

烤猪膝 Roast Pork Knuckle /168

Holland

蔬菜土豆泥 Mashed Vegetable with Potato /170

Belgium

香草华夫饼 Waffles with Vanilla Ice Cream/172

Norway

羊肉炖启菜 Stewed Mutton with Cabbage /174

Sweden

瑞典肉圆 Swedish Meat Balls /176

Finland

烟熏三文鱼 Smoked Salmon /178

Denmark

开放式三明治 Open Sandwiches /180

 



#68 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 07:37 AM

The Americas

Peru

紫玉米汁 Chicha Morada /184

Brazil

巳西烤肉 Brazilian Grilled Meats /186

Chile

三文鱼玉床沙拉 Salmon and Corn Salad /188

Argentina

马黛茶 Mate /190

United States

热狗 Hot Dogs /192
牛肉汉堡 Beef Hamburger /194
肉桂苹果派 Cinnamon Apple Pie /196
煎牛排 Steak /198

Canada

枫糖浆热松饼 Pancakes with Maple Syrup /200

Mexico

牛肉卷饼 Beef Taco /202

 

I got this done quicker than expected. So few dishes. Poor Mexico! A whole other cuisine reduced to one dish. And all Argentina's meat cooking dumped for another cup of tea!

 








 

 



#69 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 07:50 AM

And finally

 

 

Africa

Egypt

烤肉串 Beef Kebabs /206

Morocco

薄荷甜茶 Sweet Mint Tea/208
甜橙小萝卜沙拉 Sweet Orange and Radish Salad /210

 

 

Oceania

Australia

香煎澳洲小羊羔排 Australian Lamb Steaks /214

New Zealand

蛋白奶油酥 Pavlova /216

 

That's it. No more food in the world! Only two countries in Africa. 




 


Edited by liuzhou, 21 June 2014 - 07:52 AM.


#70 nakji

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 03:52 PM

Well, they were pretty precise with Canada, if they were choosing dishes that would appeal to the Chinese palate.

 

 

When I think of the Middle East, I never think of celery - I wonder if that's artistic licence, or if celery is really popular in the Arabian Peninsula? 

 

Given the popularity with which everyone is downing the meatballs at our local Ikea, it's no surprise that made the cut. The South American dishes seem completely random, but then aside from feijoada or chimichurri, I'd be hard-pressed to name any others. Maybe these are the only dishes they could find on Baidu?



#71 Smithy

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 10:16 PM

And finally

 

 

Africa

Egypt

烤肉串 Beef Kebabs /206


 

That's it. No more food in the world! Only two countries in Africa. 
 

 

...and those both of strong Arab heritage!  I got a kick out of their listing beef kababs as Egyptian; beef is expensive there, and lamb or chicken are far more common.  

 

Thanks for your translation of the contents; it's a lot of fun to read, and worth some giggles.  

 

I've had the idea that beef and mutton are expensive in China.  Is that true?  If so, do you think this cookbook makes heavy use of them to make the dishes seem more exotic?

 

Giggles aside, I'd love to know about the Feta Cheese Salad (representing Greece) on page 118.

 

 

 

When I think of the Middle East, I never think of celery - I wonder if that's artistic licence, or if celery is really popular in the Arabian Peninsula? 

 

 

That's a good question.  I don't recall celery in any of the Middle Eastern dishes I've eaten, nor do I recall seeing it in the souks in Egypt.  I'm no authority on the topic (I'm hoping Hassouni or FoodMan will pop in), so I checked with several of my Middle Eastern cookbooks, including my Egyptian cookbooks.  No mention of celery in salads that I could see.  There IS an Arabic word for celery, so it isn't a complete unknown.  Still, I'm inclined to think this recipe writer has made use of artistic license.


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#72 liuzhou

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Posted 21 June 2014 - 11:06 PM

I've had the idea that beef and mutton are expensive in China. Is that true?

 

 

I wouldn't say beef was particularly expensive - more than pork but not prohibitively so. It is widely eaten.No one would consider it exotic.

 

Mutton / lamb can be expensive here in the south where it is less common (but becoming more so), but it is very popular and cheaper in the north and north-west.

 

I thought the celery thing was odd, too. Not because I thought they didn't have it - I never thought about it at all. It just seemed strange the way it was hung onto the end of the recipe, kind of out of place. As if someone looked at the salad (at least in their imagination) and thought "Better throw something green in there."


Edited by liuzhou, 21 June 2014 - 11:44 PM.


#73 Shalmanese

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Posted 22 June 2014 - 10:33 AM



liuzhou, I wonder if, in your collection of Chinese cook book, if you've come across a sweet and sour pork recipe made mainly with black vinegar? I had hope the recipe Smithy requested above would be that sort, but it is a ketchup-based one. I had a vinegar-based one in Yunnan that I really enjoyed, and would love to try it again. Google searches have not yielded anything with the deep, dark, black sauce I remember.

 

Kent Wang had a S&S recipe on eGullet that is fantastic and it's what I now make all the time. Could that be similar to what you're looking after?


PS: I am a guy.

#74 nakji

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 12:53 AM

Ooh, that might work! I'll adapt it and try it out, as I see his is for pork ribs.



#75 udscbt

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 04:40 AM

Hello liuzhou et al.

 

I have not been looking at this forum for a while (…) but I luckily came upon this thread. I relished (no pun intended) the first "Bite of China", especially the English version, and I hope that I will be able to look at the 2nd Bite. Is an English version available on the web?

 

As to the associated cookbooks, they certainly cover a great ground! I have been able to locate a few recipes which perhaps might interest someone.

 

干煸牛肉丝 Dry Fried Beef /328 è Chiang, p.139

Chiang Jung-feng et Ellen Schreiber, Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook, ISBN 0-06-013803-0, 1976

 

毛式红烧肉 Chairman Mao's Red-Cooked Pork Belly/339  è Dunlop/Hunan, p.78

Dunlop, Fuchsia, Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-393-06222-8, 2006

 

干煸四季豆 Dry Fried  (Jinsha) Green Beans /341è Chiang, p.259

 

红烧狮子头 Red-Cooked Lion's Head Meatballs/344 è Kuo p.331; Yan-Kit p.236;

http://www.bbc.co.uk...meatballs_89292 ;

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=GunoFefV3Wk;

http://uktv.co.uk/fo...cipe/aid/603878;

http://chinesefood.a...onsheadpork.htm

Kuo, Irene, The Key to Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-394-49638-8, 1977

So, Yan-Kit, Yan-Kit’s Classic Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-7566-2351-0, 2006

 

西湖草鱼 West Lake Grass Carp /354 è Pei Mei I, p.42

Fu Pei Mei, Pei Mei’s Chinese Cook Book, Volume I, ISBN 986-7997-33-6

 

左宗棠鸡 General Tso's Chicken /360 è Dunlop/Hunan p.120

 

八宝饭 Eight Treasures Rice /433 è Yan-Kit p.238

 

担担面 Dan Dan Noodles (Sichuan Spicy Noodles) /446 è Tropp p.360; Chiang p.299

Tropp, Barbara, The Modern Art of Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-688-14611-2, 1982

 

麻婆豆腐 Mapo Tofu /512 è Chiang, p.220

 

宫爆鸡丁 Sichuan Kungpo Chicken /535 è Chiang p.171; Hom p.116

Hom, Ken, Chinese Cookery, ISBN 0-563-21053-2, 1984

 

水晶虾仁 Crystal Shrimp /565 è www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/238276 ; Kuo p.206; Wong p.177

Wong, S.T.Ting et Sylvia Schulman, More Long-Life Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-8092-5766-1, 1982

 

On a more general point, Liuzhou writes “Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme.” Is that true of most cookbooks in Chinese? I have been trying to learn to read Chinese so as to be able to find some good recipes. Is this hopeless?

 

Have a good day



#76 liuzhou

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 05:36 AM

 

I hope that I will be able to look at the 2nd Bite. Is an English version available on the web?

 

Not yet, but I'm sure it will be.

 

 

Liuzhou writes “Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme.” Is that true of most cookbooks in Chinese? I have been trying to learn to read Chinese so as to be able to find some good recipes. Is this hopeless?

 

Yes. It is generally true. All my Chinese friends who know English are waiting in line to borrow my Fuschia Dunlop books. As one friend said in awe, "It tells you how to cook the dishes!" 

Is it hopeless? Not entirely. They point in the correct direction. They are just short on detail. As I've already mentioned, you get instructions like" add enough vinegar" and "cook until cooked". With experience they are sometimes usable.

 

By the way, some of the recipes you refer to are only "similar" to what is in the book. Dunlop is usually on target. Ken Hom is known to my local friends as "Sugar Man" and they regard his shows as comedy sketches.

If I have time in the next few days I'll do a detailed comparison of one or two and post it.
 


Edited by liuzhou, 27 June 2014 - 05:49 AM.


#77 udscbt

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 12:02 AM

Hi Liuzhou,

 

Yes, I realize that "By the way, some of the recipes you refer to are only "similar" to what is in the book." 

 

In particular, there are these differences In the names

 

红烧狮子头 Red-Cooked Lion's Head Meatballs/344, the first character is different in Kuo: 沙锅狮子头first (braised è casserole?)  

 

西湖草鱼 West Lake Grass Carp /354, the 3rd character is replaced by two characters in Pei Mei 西湖醋鲤鱼 (grass è vinegar?)

 

And perhaps others …

 

ps. I don't appreciate Hom either but why "Sugar Man"?



#78 liuzhou

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Posted 28 June 2014 - 02:36 AM

红烧狮子头 Red-Cooked Lion's Head Meatballs/344, the first character is different in Kuo: 沙锅狮子头first (braised è casserole?)  

 

Actually the first two characters are different. Different cooking methods. Different dish.

 

红烧狮子头 means Red-cooked Lion's Head Meatballs I.e braised in soy sauce.

 

沙锅狮子头 means Sand Pot Lion's Head Meatballs. This is more like baked or casseroled. Usually served over rice. Here is a sandpot

 

 

西湖草鱼 West Lake Grass Carp /354, the 3rd character is replaced by two characters in Pei Mei 西湖醋鲤鱼 (grass è vinegar?)

 

No. They are just alternative names for what is essentially the same dish. "Grass Carp" is a specific type of carp. The Pei Mei recipe doesn't specify, but just says 鲤鱼, meaning carp in general. 

 

 

ps. I don't appreciate Hom either but why "Sugar Man"?

 

Because he seems to put sugar in every dish. At least on the video we watched.


Edited by liuzhou, 28 June 2014 - 02:54 AM.


#79 liuzhou

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 01:43 AM

 

If I have time in the next few days I'll do a detailed comparison of one or two and post it.

 

OK. Here goes. i will take one or two at a time, as I found it gets complicated in places.

 

 

干煸牛肉丝 Dry Fried Beef /328 e Chiang, p.139
Chiang Jung-feng et Ellen Schreiber, Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook, ISBN
0-06-013803-0, 1976

 

Chiang's recipe is online here

 

It is very similar to the one in the Bite of China (BOC) book. The only slight differences is that BOC also includes daikon radish alongside the carrot and celery, and specifies that it should be Chinese celery rather than the western celery.

Even closer is Fuchsia Dunlop's recipe in the highly recommended (and much better written) "Sichuan Cookery" (UK title) / "Land of Plenty" (US title). Don't buy both; they are localised versions of the the same book. ISBN 0-140-29541-0 / 978-0393051773. The recipe is  also in her "Every Grain of Rice." ISBN 978-1408802526

 

It's here, too


Edited by liuzhou, 29 June 2014 - 01:47 AM.


#80 liuzhou

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Posted 29 June 2014 - 11:42 PM

 

 

毛式红烧肉 Chairman Mao's Red-Cooked Pork Belly/339 è Dunlop/Hunan, p.78

Dunlop, Fuchsia, Revolutionary Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-393-06222-8, 2006

 

Dunlop's recipe can be seen here. It is essentially the same as that in the Bite of China book. She is usually on the mark.

 

The only real difference I can see is that she calls for "1lb. pork belly (skin optional)“ Skin wouldn't be optional in Hunan; it would be essential. The BOC book specifically calls for 带皮五花肉, which, to cut a long story short, means fatty pork belly WITH skin. Bizarrely, the recipe also throws in some fish balls, something I've never come across. I spent two years living in Hunan and saw and ate a lot of Mr. Mao's favourite, but don't recall a single fish ball.

 

 



#81 liuzhou

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 07:20 PM

干煸四季豆 Dry Fried  (Jinsha) Green Beans /341è Chiang, p.259

 

 

I’m confused. You seem to be conflating two different dishes into one. Page 341 contains two bean recipes:

 

干煸四季豆 Dry Fried Green Beans /341

金沙四季豆 Golden Sand Green Beans /341

 

Jinsha (金沙) means “Golden Sand”.  They are very different dishes, apart from both containing beans.

 

Anyway, I have no access to the Chiang recipe, so I can't say anything about it.

 

Once again, Fuchsia Dunlop has a very good recipe for Dry Fried Green Beans in her Sichuan book. Actually two. A traditional non-vegetarian version (available here) and a vegetarian version (here). She doesn't do the golden sand recipe.

 

However, the recipe in Bite of China is very different from anything I've ever seen described as dry-fried green beans.  It is vegetarian and includes oyster sauce and dried chillies rather than the pork and Sichuan preserved vegetables used in the classic dish.

 

Ingredients: 400g green beans, 3g salt, 2g MSG, 2g chicken extract, 10g oyster sauce, 15g Sichuan peppercorn oil, 3 cloves garlic, 10g scallion, 20g dried chilli peppers.

 

The cooking method is similar to other recipes.  The beans are fried separately until cooked then are set aside. The other ingredients are combined and fried, then poured over the beans, then served.

 

tiger skin peppers dried fried beans.jpg

TIger skin peppers and dry-fried green beans (Fuchsia Dunlop recipes)



#82 liuzhou

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Posted 30 June 2014 - 09:32 PM

 

 

红烧狮子头 Red-Cooked Lion's Head Meatballs/344 è Kuo p.331; Yan-Kit p.236;

http://www.bbc.co.uk...meatballs_89292 ;

http://uktv.co.uk/fo...ipe/aid/603878;

http://chinesefood.a...onsheadpork.htm

Kuo, Irene, The Key to Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-394-49638-8, 1977

So, Yan-Kit, Yan-Kit’s Classic Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-7566-2351-0, 2006

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk...meatballs_89292

 

The Huang Ching-He recipe is nearest to the BOC recipe in terms of ingredients except that she makes one drastic deviation from the traditional recipe by using beef instead of pork. I can’t see that going down well in Shanghai. But she is always doing things like that.

Also her cooking method is western rather than Chinese. The balls are fried then baked rather than steamed then fried as they would be in China. She finishes them in an oven; something very few Chinese households (or even restaurants) possess.

 

http://uktv.co.uk/food/recipe/aid/603878

 

This is actually for a slightly different dish – lion’s head soup. And, oh dear. Mr Rhodes, as ever, complicates the dish out of all recognition. Delicious it may be, but it isn’t Shanghai lion’s head soup in any form I’ve ever come across. Also steaming for three and half hours? 

 

Does he mean crab meat as mentioned in the introduction or crab roe as in the recipe listing?

 

Also he suggests using pork leg mixed with pork fat. The traditional Shanghai method is to use fatty pork belly五花脯肉 (wǔ huā pú ròu).

 

 

http://chinesefood.a...onsheadpork.htm

 

 

To my surprise, the recipe here is very close to BOC. I’ve always been very unimpressed by this site’s coverage of Chinese food (and other aspects of China). Again the choice of meat is unspecified – just ground pork. Most recipes, including BOC specify fatty pork belly. Much ground meat as sold in supermarkets will not be fatty enough, making the meatballs dry.

 

Kuo, Irene, The Key to Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-394-49638-8, 1977

 

So, Yan-Kit, Yan-Kit’s Classic Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-7566-2351-0, 2006

 

Sadly, I have no access to these two books, so can’t comment.

 

The BOC recipe includes the fatty pork belly, chopped water chestnut, shiitake mushroom, boy choy, egg, oyster sauce, salt, MSG, sugar syrup, and ginger.

 

The pork is ground with the ginger and salt and the water chestnut finely diced. These are combined with egg and mixed until sticky, then formed into large balls.

 

The meatballs are steamed for an hour, then fried until golden brown, drained and plated. The cleaned mushroom and bok choy are boiled in seasoned, oiled water until cooked, then poured over the balls.


Edited by liuzhou, 30 June 2014 - 10:05 PM.


#83 udscbt

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 05:28 AM

 Hi Liuzhou,

 

Looks like you have been working overtime! All that information is quite impressive and useful.

 

I have looked at the Index for the 1st cookbook of Bite of China (BOC1) and I think I have found some more relevant recipes.

 

There is some overlap between the 1st and 2nd BOC cookbooks though sometimes with somewhat different names. I have compared the indices of both cookbooks and found the following, BOC1 at first :

 

麻婆豆腐 - Mapo Tofu /014 (BOC2 /512) also see a recipe in Kuo, Irene, The Key to Chinese Cooking, ISBN 0-394-49638-8 (1977) p.405

蒜泥白肉 - Garlic Boiled Pork /016 (BOC2 /561 Mashed Garlic Pork)

夫妻肺片 - Man and Wife Lungs /018 (BOC2 /386)

西湖醋鱼 - West Lake Sour Soup /035 (BOC2 /356 West Lake Vinegar Fish)

钟水饺 - Boiled Dumplings (Jiaozi) /037 (BOC2 /430 "Clock" Boiled Dumplings)

川北凉粉 - North Sichuan Bean Jelly /044 (BOC2 /513)

毛家红烧肉 - Chairman Mao's Family Red-cooked Pork Belly/050 (BOC2 /339&522)

梅菜扣肉 - Pickled Mustard with Steamed Pork Belly/078 (BOC2 /371 Dried Mustard Green Pork Belly)

贵妃鸡 - Highest Ranking Concubine Chicken /095 (BOC2 /588 Highest Ranking Concubine Chicken Wings with an additional character in the name: 贵妃鸡)

咸烧白 - Salt Roasted Pork Belly /120 (BOC2 /521 Stewed Salt Pork Belly)

火焙鱼 Baked Fish /138 (BOC2 /513 Hunan Flavour Baked Fish with 2 additional characters in the name: 湘味火焙鱼)

重庆烧鸡公 Chongqing Stewed Chicken /146 (BOC2 /596 Chongqing Chicken Hot Pot with 2 additional characters in the name: 重庆烧鸡公火锅)

东坡肘子 Dongpo Pork Elbow /174 (BOC2 /541 Meizhou East Slope Pork Elbow with 2 additional characters in the name: 眉州东坡肘子)

宫保鸡丁 Gongbao (Kungpo ) Chicken /178 (BOC2 /535 Sichuan Kungpo Chicken with 1 different character in the name: 宫爆鸡丁)

左宗棠鸡 General Tso's Chicken /199 (BOC2 /360) also see a recipe in http://chinesefood.a.../generaltso.htm

湘西土匪鸭 Hunan Bandit Duck /217 (BOC2 /520 West Hunan Bandit's Duck)

四喜丸子 Four Happiness Meatballs/240 (BOC2 /357 Four Happiness Balls)

咕噜肉 Whispering Pork /302 (BOC2 /512 Pork Whispers)

回锅肉 Twice Cooked Pork /304 (BOC2 /380 Twice-Cooked Pork with Pickled Vegetables with 2 additional characters in the name: 泡菜回锅肉)  also see recipes in Chiang Jung-feng et Ellen Schreiber, Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook, ISBN 0-06-013803-0 (1976) p.94, Dunlop, Fuchsia, Land of Plenty, ISBN 0-393-05177-3 (2001) p.194 and Kuo p.334

冬笋腊肉 Winter Bamboo Shoots with Cured Meat /334 (BOC2 /370 Winter Bamboo Shoot Cured Pork)

热干面 Hot Dry Noodles /337 (BOC2 /449 Hot Dried Noodles)

 

And here are some new dishes with possible recipes:

 

佛跳墙 - Buddha Leaps the Wall /026 è Fu Pei Mei, Pei Mei’s Chinese Cook Book, Volume III, ISBN 986-7997-67-0, p.257 and Eileen Yin-Fei Lo(?), http://chinesefood.a...blrecipe078.htm)

龙井虾仁 - Dragon's Well Shrimp /096 è Rhodes, http://uktv.co.uk/fo...cipe/aid/603865

东坡肉 - Dong Po Pork/102 è http://www.eatingchi...dongpo-pork.htm (uses traditional characters  東坡)and http://rasamalaysia....ly-dong-po-rou/

棒棒鸡 - Bang Bang Chicken/117 è Chiang Jung-feng et Ellen Schreiber, Mrs. Chiang’s Szechwan Cookbook, ISBN 0-06-013803-0 (1976) p.163 and Ching-He Huang http://uktv.co.uk/fo...cipe/aid/517217

东安子鸡 Dong'an Chicken/170 è Dunlop/Hunan p.114 (http://leitesculinar...ce-vinegar.html)

 

Have a good day, G

 

ps. the BOC1 video was so visually incredible and informative (especially concerning ingredients) that I wonder if you happen to know where I can find the BOC2 video even in Mandarin.



#84 liuzhou

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Posted 05 July 2014 - 06:17 AM

Just be glad I didn't do the other 9 books.

 

Of course there are overlaps.  It is just blatant cashing in on the success of the shows.

 

The slight variations in names is nothing. In China, there are always many names for the same dish. Even on the same street. Even in the same restaurant. Same happens in English, but probably more so here..

 

BOC2 has not yet been officially released. If it follows the pattern of BOC1, it could still be a year away and the English longer.

(I do have it though. :raz: )


Edited by liuzhou, 05 July 2014 - 06:45 AM.


#85 flippant

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Posted 13 August 2014 - 07:22 AM

Great thread!

 

I did a 3-month course at SHIC (四川烹饪高等专科学校, now, it seems renamed to the more general 四川旅游学院) in Chengdu. The curriculum was comprised of three books: 川菜烹调技术 and , as well as a book on baking I can't for the life of me find right now.

 

The Shang (上) volume is concerned with technique and history, while Xia (下) is a recipe book.

 

The recipes are very well explained: the quantity of each ingredient in grams; what size and shape to cut things in; what heat to have the wok at; what order to cook the dish; variations, etc.

 

The downside is that there are no photos, except for the cover and 8 or so very uninspired ones inside the cover.

 

However, I find them excellent starting points.



#86 CeeCee

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Posted 17 August 2014 - 12:31 PM


So, Yan-Kit, Yan-Kit’s Classic Chinese Cookbook, ISBN 0-7566-2351-0, 2006

 

Sadly, I have no access to these two books, so can’t comment.

 


Thank you for starting this topic, very interesting read!

If you would like to compare, I can take a picture of the recipe in this book and email it you?



#87 James G

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 12:39 AM

Thank you so much for posting this. Whenever I am in China I always look for interesting cookbooks (I read Chinese and spent many years there) but have always found that they are not terribly good at presenting the instructions in a coherent way. There is also a terrible lack of comprehensive regional cookbooks for some obscure regions (I'd kill for a Guizhou cookbook, for instance). This book looks like one I'd be interested in; wonder if Taobao sells it since I doubt it'll show up in my local PaperPlus anytime soon.

 

A few weeks ago I bought a copy of this cookbook which is a best-selling spin off from the highly successful television series by China Central Television - A Bite of China as discussed on this thread.   .

 

attachicon.gifcover.jpg

 

The book was published in August 2013 and is by Chen Zhitian (陈志田 - chén zhì tián). It is only available in Chinese (so far). 

 

There are a number of books related to the television series but this is the only one which seems to be legitimate. It certainly has the high production standards of the television show. Beautifully photographed and with (relatively) clear details in the recipes.

 

Here is a sample page.

 

attachicon.gifsample page.jpg

 

Unlike in most western cookbooks, recipes are not listed by main ingredient. They are set out in six vaguely defined chapters. So, if you are looking for a duck dish, for example, you'll have to go through the whole contents list. I've never seen an index in any Chinese book on any subject. 

 

In order to demonstrate the breadth of recipes the book and perhaps to be of interest to forum members who want to know what is in a popular Chinese recipe book, I have sort of translated the contents list - 187 recipes.

 

This is always problematic. Very often Chinese dishes are very cryptically named. This list contains some literal translations. For some dishes I have totally ignored the given name and given a brief description instead. Any Chinese in the list refers to place names. Some dishes I have left with literal translations of their cryptic names, just for amusement value.

 

I am not happy with some of the "translations" and will work on improving them. I am also certain there are errors in there, too.

 

Back in 2008, the Chinese government issued a list of official dish translations for the Beijing Olympics. It is full of weird translations and total errors, too. Interestingly, few of the dishes in the book or on that list.

 

Anyway, for what it is worth, the book's content list is here (Word document) or here (PDF file). If anyone is interested in more information on a dish, please ask. For copyright reasons, I can't reproduce the dishes here exactly, but can certainly describe them.

 

Another problem is that many Chinese recipes are vague in the extreme. I'm not one to slavishly follow instructions, but saying "enough meat" in a recipe is not very helpful. This book gives details (by weight) for the main ingredients, but goes vague on most  condiments.

 

For example, the first dish (Dezhou Braised Chicken), calls for precisely 1500g of chicken, 50g dried mushroom, 20g sliced ginger and 10g of scallion. It then lists cassia bark, caoguo, unspecified herbs, Chinese cardamom, fennel seed, star anise, salt, sodium bicarbonate and cooking wine without suggesting any quantities. It then goes back to ask for 35g of maltose syrup, a soupçon of cloves, and "the correct quantity" of soy sauce.

 

Cooking instructions can be equally vague. "Cook until cooked".

 

A Bite of China - 舌尖上的中国- ISBN 978-7-5113-3940-9 



#88 liuzhou

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Posted 18 August 2014 - 01:08 AM

Thank you so much for posting this. Whenever I am in China I always look for interesting cookbooks (I read Chinese and spent many years there) but have always found that they are not terribly good at presenting the instructions in a coherent way. There is also a terrible lack of comprehensive regional cookbooks for some obscure regions (I'd kill for a Guizhou cookbook, for instance). This book looks like one I'd be interested in; wonder if Taobao sells it since I doubt it'll show up in my local PaperPlus anytime soon.

 

 

Yes, It's on Taobao here.


Edited by liuzhou, 18 August 2014 - 01:09 AM.






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