Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the society.

Photo

Laksa


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 02 January 2003 - 10:10 PM

I was reading the post about the Laksa some eGulleteers enjoyed at Shopsins in NYC. It took me back to those great bowls that have eaten in parts of Asia.

I have never made any at home.

Recipes or tips anyone?

Pan, I am hoping you would find this thread and share some of your insight. I have enjoyed reading your posts on Malaysian cooking before... I think you had lived there... Am I correct in assuming that? Thanks for any help you can provide me with this.. and also to all others...:smile:

#2 Bond Girl

Bond Girl
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,636 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 02 January 2003 - 10:26 PM

Suvir,
Are you talking about the Laksa Noodle soup? I have a super spicy recipe taught to me by a singapore lady but I can't seemed to find fresh laksa leaves anywhere in NYC. The chef at TanDa (I think his name is Stanley Wong?) once told me that you can only get Laksa leaves at certain times in New York, and then you have to go to Chinatown. Being Taiwanese, I have being rummaging through Chinatown these past months looking for it. Do you know where to find it?
Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

#3 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 02 January 2003 - 10:31 PM

Suvir,
Are you talking about the Laksa Noodle soup?  I have a super spicy recipe taught to me by a singapore lady but I can't seemed to find fresh laksa leaves anywhere in NYC.  The chef at TanDa (I think his name is Stanley Wong?) once told me that you can only get Laksa leaves at certain times in New York, and then you have to go to Chinatown.  Being Taiwanese, I have being rummaging through Chinatown these past months looking for it.  Do you know where to find it?

Bond Girl, yes it is the same soup. I had the tastiest one I have ever had in Goa. :shock: Honestly! And then the second favorite version of it in Singapore. They are both fresh and alive in my memory.

I am not sure where one can buy these leaves. In fact I did not even know there was something called Laksa leaves... eGullet teaches me something every day.

Have you seen the new created Chinese forum? I am sure Ed Schoenfeld and the rest of us can stand to gain a lot from your experiences growing up as a Taiwanese. I know Ed has been to Taiwan and has fond memories.

I shall let you know if I ever come across these leaves.... Now I shall make an effort to find out more about Laksa.

#4 Bond Girl

Bond Girl
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,636 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 02 January 2003 - 10:36 PM

Suvir, I will check out the Chinese board ASAP. Laksa leaves gives the Laksa Lemak that slightly soapy taste. I believe it's in the mint family because it's also called Hot Mint. Vietnamese food use it as well, and they look like little basils. If you find it, please let me know.
Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

#5 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 02 January 2003 - 10:38 PM

Suvir, I will check out the Chinese board ASAP.  Laksa leaves gives the Laksa Lemak that slightly soapy taste.  I believe it's in the mint family because it's also called Hot Mint.  Vietnamese food use it as well, and they look like little basils. If you find it, please let me know.

I have seen them in China town in a Vietnamese restaurant last year.
I was eating at a Banquet that Mai Pham had led for some food writers. And we defintely tasted hot mint...
I shall try and see if I can get a hold of Mai and see if she has any more information on these leaves.

And yes, do check out the Chinese board... I look forward to learning more about that great cuisine through your posts there. :smile:

#6 Bond Girl

Bond Girl
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,636 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 03 January 2003 - 05:46 PM

Just recalled that I had a creamy laksa flavored curry soup at some Charity benefit two months ago, and I believe, it is from the TanDa table. This one is a lot richer than then on the Singapore/Nyonya version, less spicy and definitely contain some sort of heavy cream or coconut cream. I don't know if it's even on the menu, but if you get a chance to eat there, definitly give it try!
Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

#7 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 04 January 2003 - 02:10 AM

A food writer friend in Singapore wrote back to me and said Laksa Lemak is a Singaporean dish and was created there.

Laksa leaves is the Singapore name for Vietnamese Mint leaves.

They told me that one could but Laksa Paste commercially and that chile and shrimp were the crucial ingredients of a good Laksa blend.

They also said many chefs add Kafir lime into the soup.

Coconut milk and not cream give the soup its creamy texture.

#8 Bond Girl

Bond Girl
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,636 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 04 January 2003 - 08:56 AM

Since my version of Laksa Lemak was taught to me inofrmally, I don't have an exact recipe. But, the main thing is to make a paste out of 1 stalk of lemongrass, half an inch length of galangal roots, a clove of minced garlic, a pinch each of tumeric and coriander seeds with a heaping tablespoon of shrimp paste. I like to add a dash of fish sauce and a bit of palm sugar as well.

Once you get that into paste, fry it over some canola oil to release the aroma. Whenever it's ready, you will start to sneeze. Then just throw in some chicken stock (I find veggie stock or water will work too since I hate chicken with a passion) and coconut milk. For every cup of stock I put in about 1/2 cup of coconut milk, but I've seen people make it with more coconut milk than stock. I'd make it with Udon noodles sometimes, and some bean sprouts and chinese fry tofu puffs so all those goes in at the end. I've never try it with Kafir lime juice in it, but if I can find it in Chinatown, I will experiement with it sometimes this weekend.

Edited by Bond Girl, 04 January 2003 - 09:00 AM.

Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

#9 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 04 January 2003 - 09:00 AM

Kaffir lime leaves are what I am told they use in Singapore. Not the juice. :smile:

#10 Bond Girl

Bond Girl
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 1,636 posts
  • Location:NYC

Posted 04 January 2003 - 09:02 AM

Thanks, Suvir. I tried it with Thai Basil once, but found that it didn't do very much. But I do think some sort of citrus flavor will bring a good twist to what is a very dense soup.
Ya-Roo Yang aka "Bond Girl"

The Adventures of Bond Girl

I don't ask for much, but whatever you do give me, make it of the highest quality.

#11 Suvir Saran

Suvir Saran
  • legacy participant
  • 4,877 posts

Posted 04 January 2003 - 09:04 AM

I think so too. In Goa they had used the leaves of a kaagazi nimbu (paper thin lime) and they did give a great citrus taste. It made all the difference.