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Malt Vinegar Powder


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15 replies to this topic

#1 David Ross

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 06:04 PM

I recently saw a Chef on a TV show use "malt vinegar powder."  It was one of the ingredients in a dry seasoning mix for deep-fried chicken cutlets.  Apparently it has a unique flavor and it sounds intriguing.  I was thinking of using it in a batter for deep-fried fish.

 

Anyone ever use malt vinegar powder and if so, do you have a good online source?



#2 Tri2Cook

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 07:00 PM

Modernist Pantry has it in 50g and 400g packs.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#3 gfweb

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 09:09 PM

I'm confused about this product. As far as I know malt vinegar is like any other vinegar. Acetic acid is volatile and won't be dried into a powder. It will evaporate.

 

One might get things that taste like vinegar eg citric acid (see the discussion of potato chip flavors) but they won't actually be vinegar.



#4 Tri2Cook

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 03:23 AM

I don't know anything about the process of making it. The Great American Spice Co, lists the ingredients as maltodextrin and malt vinegar and claims it can be used as a replacement for liquid malt vinegar in recipes by mixing 1 part powder with 2 parts water. Amazon has it in 1 lb. containers that are cheaper than either of the other places I mentioned and their description says "adds a nice tangy, vinegary flavor". None of the ingredient lists I've seen mention any other acid being added so I'm assuming something of the original malt vinegar manages to survive the process.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#5 gfweb

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 04:40 AM

I don't know anything about the process of making it. The Great American Spice Co, lists the ingredients as maltodextrin and malt vinegar and claims it can be used as a replacement for liquid malt vinegar in recipes by mixing 1 part powder with 2 parts water. Amazon has it in 1 lb. containers that are cheaper than either of the other places I mentioned and their description says "adds a nice tangy, vinegary flavor". None of the ingredient lists I've seen mention any other acid being added so I'm assuming something of the original malt vinegar manages to survive the process.

 

Ah, the  maltodextrin entraps the vinegar and keeps it from evaporating off. That's how the first product does it.



#6 David Ross

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 09:47 AM

So if I mixed the dry malt vinegar powder in with flour, cornstarch, other spices and water do you think the batter would end up having a bit of malt vinegar flavor?  Of course the description on the Great American Spice page says so, but I'm wondering what a cook would say?



#7 gfweb

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 09:56 AM

So if I mixed the dry malt vinegar powder in with flour, cornstarch, other spices and water do you think the batter would end up having a bit of malt vinegar flavor?  Of course the description on the Great American Spice page says so, but I'm wondering what a cook would say?

Frying, I would think, would blow-off all the acetic acid.

 

Would malt taste linger? Dunno. It might be lost in the fatty batter.

 

I recall a series of posts years ago re trying to make smoked salmon devilled eggs. All kinds of combinations failed to taste salmony/smokey seemingly because the fat in the yolk hid the flavors. As yolk was reduced, the flavor appeared.

 

Might be the same with a fried batter.  Maybe better to make a malt vinegar glaze and toss the battered and fried stuff in it like a buffalo wing.



#8 Blether

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 10:08 AM

I've done fish batter using 100% vinegar in place of water.  That gave a good, vinegared flavour.


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QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#9 Tri2Cook

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 12:43 PM

So if I mixed the dry malt vinegar powder in with flour, cornstarch, other spices and water do you think the batter would end up having a bit of malt vinegar flavor?  Of course the description on the Great American Spice page says so, but I'm wondering what a cook would say?


I've never actually tried anything like what you're wanting to do. It sounds like it'd be tasty if it works (and I personally think it would work) but I honestly don't know.

 


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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#10 KennethT

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 02:40 PM

I think a better result might be obtained by using a standard batter for frying, then dust with the malt vinegar powder afterwards.
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#11 Tri2Cook

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 03:01 PM

I think a better result might be obtained by using a standard batter for frying, then dust with the malt vinegar powder afterwards.


I'm inclined to think that too but I haven't tried using it in a batter or as a post-cook seasoning so I don't really know. Worst case, if the powder didn't work out for the fish, it would probably be tasty for seasoning fries/chips. Actually, I guess the worst case would be if it was just plain not good and had to be tossed...


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#12 Blether

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 10:46 PM

I've done fish batter using 100% vinegar in place of water.  That gave a good, vinegared flavour.

 

I didn't phrase that very well.  Should read "with vinegar in place of 100% of the water".  It was malt vinegar, Heinz I think.


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.


#13 Tri2Cook

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:12 AM

I didn't phrase that very well.  Should read "with vinegar in place of 100% of the water".  It was malt vinegar, Heinz I think.


Yeah, that seems the most efficient way to go about it. I assumed since he wanted to give the powder a go that he probably already tried using actual vinegar and there was something he didn't like about the result.

 


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

#14 David Ross

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 11:27 AM

Thanks,this is all good feedback and, I think, calls for me to do about 4 different tests-

-Dried malt vinegar powder added to the batter.

-Malt vinegar as a replacement for water in the batter.

-Fried fish seasoned with malt vinegar powder after it comes out of the fryer.

-Fried fish tossed in a glaze made with malt vinegar powder.

 

Should be interesting.  I think for test purposed I'll start with a mild fish like cod.  If one of these methods works, then I'll try it with halibut that we're getting fresh out of Alaska right now.


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#15 gfweb

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 12:04 PM

Thanks,this is all good feedback and, I think, calls for me to do about 4 different tests-

-Dried malt vinegar powder added to the batter.

-Malt vinegar as a replacement for water in the batter.

-Fried fish seasoned with malt vinegar powder after it comes out of the fryer.

-Fried fish tossed in a glaze made with malt vinegar powder.

 

Should be interesting.  I think for test purposed I'll start with a mild fish like cod.  If one of these methods works, then I'll try it with halibut that we're getting fresh out of Alaska right now.

A think I should fly out and help with the tasting.


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#16 Robin G

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Posted 11 May 2014 - 02:54 PM

Thanks,this is all good feedback and, I think, calls for me to do about 4 different tests-

David, I'm dying to know how these tests have turned out...