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Cooking from "My Paris Kitchen"

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#61 Anna N

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:04 PM

Chicken pot Parmentier (think shepherd's pie but using chicken or in my case turkey)


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You will note the absence of the peas that the recipe calls for. There are those in my family who would consider finding a bug in the food far less objectionable than finding a pea. Also I had to forgo the tarragon as there was none to be had.

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It occurred to me that the chosen dish was a bit too shallow to accommodate the filling AND the potato topping. I divided the filling between two dishes which proved most propitious as one fed me and son Number 2 (with lots of leftovers for him to take home) and one fed my daughter's family.

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I had no issues with this recipe. It won't replace shepherd's pie but it does make good use of leftover chicken or turkey.
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#62 rotuts

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 04:07 PM

Wow  !

 

thanks AnnaN

 

I like to use my left over vertical roast Weber'd chickens for a corn tortilla casserole w green chili sauce.

 

Ill put this item on reserve for the same sort of thing !

 

My library copy is on Reserve.

 

for me !


Edited by rotuts, 24 April 2014 - 04:08 PM.


#63 gfweb

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Posted 24 April 2014 - 07:14 PM


You will note the absence of the peas that the recipe calls for. There are those in my family who would consider finding a bug in the food far less objectionable than finding a pea. Also I had to forgo the tarragon as there was none to be had.

 

 

I agree with your family member(s). Finding a pea (or a raisin for that matter) in a dish is akin to a cockaroach in my soup.


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#64 fvandrog

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 12:23 AM

I tackled three recipes yesterday.


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The green beans with snail butter. Green beans are steamed until tender then briefly sauteed with butter, garlic, parsley and finished with salt, pepper and lemon juice. What's not to like? I had no issues with this recipe. It's an interesting take on "snail butter" but it won't push my tiny mushrooms in snail butter aside.

 
I made these the other day, and I have to admit that they tasted great. I missed out on the lemon juice part though, the only lemon we had left could compete with the average baseball in terms of firmness. Unfortunately, an average baseball could have competed with that lemon with regards to juiciness.....


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#65 fvandrog

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 01:58 AM

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Boneless lamb shoulder.

I wasn't able to get bone-in lamb shoulder, but I imagine that's not going to be a huge issue. This was stuffed with slivers of heirloom garlic and oil-packed anchovy fillets, then rubbed with sea salt and black pepper.


Out of curiosity, why (and how) would you use a shoulder with bone for stuffing?

(We spend 45 minutes last Sunday de-boning a gigot in order to stuff it. Got to admit, most of those 45 minutes were spend looking for a sharp knife without success and then running the grinding stone).



#66 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:43 AM

Out of curiosity, why (and how) would you use a shoulder with bone for stuffing?

(We spend 45 minutes last Sunday de-boning a gigot in order to stuff it. Got to admit, most of those 45 minutes were spend looking for a sharp knife without success and then running the grinding stone).


Because that's what the recipe calls for.

As for how, you'll have to buy the book.

Edited by SobaAddict70, 25 April 2014 - 04:44 AM.


#67 fvandrog

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:49 AM

Because that's what the recipe calls for.


That's a clear cut answer  :wink: 
 

As for how, you'll have to buy the book.


It's almost near the top of my wish-list.

#68 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:00 AM

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Crudités plate -- French breakfast radishes, asparagus, hard-cooked farm egg w/anchovy.

The mayonnaise is leftover herb mayonnaise from the oeufs mayo.

The aioli plate (pages 145-147) calls for a garlic aioli, which this is not. That being said, I'll be making it again when my partner comes to town because it's an excuse to eat anchovies again. We're both anchovy freaks. I've never had eggs paired with anchovy in this manner, and I have to say, I like the idea very much.
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#69 LindaK

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 07:42 AM

OK, I’m on board. I hesitated to buy the book because I have dozens of French cookbooks so I’ve become choosy.    But I went ahead and am so glad that I did.  The writing and photos alone are worth the price of admission.  If you enjoy David’s blog, this book is a joy.  If you’ve spent any time living and cooking in France, it will bring back memories that will make you weep. Or at least jealous.

 

My first effort was tasty but not a home run: Panade de Butternut (Butternut Squash Bread Soup).  Though it’s spring, I had a squash hanging around and this seemed right for current cold, wet evenings.  It’s basically a savory bread pudding with layers of sourdough bread, butternut squash, sautéed onions, and cheese.

 

Plus:  great flavors, simple to assemble, no special equipment or ingredients (except for homemade chicken stock, absolutely necessary). Leftovers tasted even better. 

 

Con:  The bottom bread layer was heavy as lead, I think because the recipe has you add a lot of chicken stock to the final assembled dish before baking, even AFTER you’ve already moistened each layer.  Clearly it did not need that much stock.  I’ll try this recipe again, next time skipping the extra stock at the outset, and instead checking the panade during baking, basting with stock as needed.

 

Following the recipe as written ends up with a final dish that doesn’t look remotely like the photo in the book.  That could also explain my results.  The book photo shows what looks like separate, individually assembled panades, with layers of well-toasted bread slices filled to overflowing with the squash and onions, like a soupy sandwich. See photo:

 

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By contrast, the recipe has you layer the bread in a baking dish to cover, breaking the bread slices if necessary.  So you end up cutting the final panade into squares or wedges, and the bread doesn’t have the toasty crustiness that’s so appealing in the photo, and maybe prevents the soggy lower layer.  My result:

 

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I have some other small quibbles with the recipe but nothing major.  I will make this again when butternut squash is back in season, not only adjusting assembly but also upping the amount of herbs.

 

 



 


#70 LindaK

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Posted 04 May 2014 - 06:39 AM

Two more recipes to report on--

 

Rillettes de Sardines.  Very simple and very tasty.  I was out of capers so subbed some finely minced cornichons.  Served with toasted whole wheat bread with dried cranberries and walnuts. Excellent combination. This will make it into my regular rotation.  Though in the Appetizer section of the cookbook, and I can easily see it as part of a light supper with some soup.

 

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I also tried the Pissaladiere. While I was able to cover the pan with the dough in a thin layer without much problem, I'll admit that I prefer the bready style dough I'm used to.  The topping is classic and simple.  As for the anchovies, I don't like big bites of the little guys, maybe I just can't get good ones. But do like the hint of brininess they offer, so what I did was toss a few of them in with the onions towards the end of their long cooking so that they just dissolved into the topping. Good olives are a must.

No picture of this one, sorry.

 



 


#71 SobaAddict70

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Posted 07 May 2014 - 06:20 AM

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Rillettes de sardines ("sardine spread").

The recipe for this is from pages 78-79 of "My Paris Kitchen".

B remarked that it was quite delicious and addictive. It's also somewhat rich and best consumed over time, or at a dinner party. I halved the proportions David calls for in the original recipe, and subbed lemon juice for lime juice, but otherwise it's as written.

#72 SobaAddict70

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:10 AM

I'll be attempting the chicken with mustard sauce tonight.

I had wanted to make this while B was visiting me, but we never got around to it. Lots of heavy meals around the time of our dinner at Gramercy Tavern put the kibosh on those set of plans. Oh well.

I'll try to remember to take lots of pix while I'm preparing things. Might have enough material for a blog post in the next few days.

It occurs to me that this thread is just like an eG Foodblog...hmmm....maybe there might be another one in the near future.... :wink: :blink: :raz: :cool: :wub:


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#73 Anna N

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 10:15 AM

I'll be attempting the chicken with mustard sauce tonight.
I had wanted to make this while B was visiting me, but we never got around to it. Lots of heavy meals around the time of our dinner at Gramercy Tavern put the kibosh on those set of plans. Oh well.
I'll try to remember to take lots of pix while I'm preparing things. Might have enough material for a blog post in the next few days.
It occurs to me that this thread is just like an eG Foodblog...hmmm....maybe there might be another one in the near future.... :wink: :blink: :raz: :cool: :wub:

Food blogs are the best. Do consider it!

Edited to make sense.

Edited by Anna N, 15 May 2014 - 10:15 AM.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#74 scamhi

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 02:07 PM

Oh, it was absolutely divine.

I only wish I'd had bone-in lamb as opposed to boneless lamb shoulder.
 

Soba- go to the International Meat Market in Astoria, they have bone in shoulders at about 1/3 to 1/2 price to the Eataly product. they are open Saturdays.


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#75 SobaAddict70

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Posted 15 May 2014 - 11:37 PM

Thanks scamhi.
 
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I halved the amount of bacon -- this is roughly 1/2 cup diced thick-cut bacon (4 rashers).

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Browning the chicken took a little longer than usual, probably because I slathered on too much mustard.  I don't think that's a shortcoming of the recipe, just my own inexperience.

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I skipped the mustard seeds he calls for in the penultimate step, and used 1/4 less tsp. sea salt in the beginning.  Otherwise it's as written.

 

Definitely a keeper.


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#76 LindaK

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 02:38 PM

Caillettes—Pork and Chard Sausages

 

This recipe called out to me. First, because caillettes seem like easy, individual pates. Second, because David says he learned the dish from a little Paris wine bar-restaurant, Le Verre Volé, that I remember fondly.

 

The ingredient list sounded good—ground pork, chicken livers, swiss chard, onions, garlic, egg, bacon, herbs and spices.   But the recipe itself had me concerned—it calls for cooking the pork and livers first, mixing the ingredients, forming patties, and then baking them.  Why cook the meat first?  The recipe says to bake the formed caillettes until the meat is cooked through.  But it’s already cooked through…I was skeptical.

 

Against my better judgment, I followed the recipe but I would advise you to do otherwise.  The mixture held together when I formed them into the quenelle shape but barely.  The results were well seasoned but despite the bacon slices on top, the caillettes were as dry as I feared. 

 

Only afterwards did I do some homework on caillettes. There are lots of recipes online and on my bookshelf I found one in Julia Child’s MTAFC Vol. 2.  They all share similar ingredient lists, but I didn’t find one that called for cooking the meat first.   

 

I like the concept of this recipe so will try it again, this time grinding the pork and liver together and mixing other ingredients with the raw meat.  If anyone has a better idea, I’d be interested.

 

I took a photo but my camera’s not cooperating, if I can post it later I will.

 



 


#77 Anna N

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 03:01 PM

Caillettes—Pork and Chard Sausages
 
This recipe called out to me. First, because caillettes seem like easy, individual pates. Second, because David says he learned the dish from a little Paris wine bar-restaurant, Le Verre Volé, that I remember fondly.
 
The ingredient list sounded good—ground pork, chicken livers, swiss chard, onions, garlic, egg, bacon, herbs and spices.   But the recipe itself had me concerned—it calls for cooking the pork and livers first, mixing the ingredients, forming patties, and then baking them.  Why cook the meat first?  The recipe says to bake the formed caillettes until the meat is cooked through.  But it’s already cooked through…I was skeptical.
 
Against my better judgment, I followed the recipe but I would advise you to do otherwise.  The mixture held together when I formed them into the quenelle shape but barely.  The results were well seasoned but despite the bacon slices on top, the caillettes were as dry as I feared. 
 
Only afterwards did I do some homework on caillettes. There are lots of recipes online and on my bookshelf I found one in Julia Child’s MTAFC Vol. 2.  They all share similar ingredient lists, but I didn’t find one that called for cooking the meat first.   
 
I like the concept of this recipe so will try it again, this time grinding the pork and liver together and mixing other ingredients with the raw meat.  If anyone has a better idea, I’d be interested.
 
I took a photo but my camera’s not cooperating, if I can post it later I will.


I would love to hear from David. Somehow it seems as if he did not proofread or if he did his suggested changes were not incorporated into the final manuscript. For his pound cake he instructs you to use room temperature butter cut it into cubes. You then melt it. Uh?
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#78 SobaAddict70

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 05:30 PM

He's on Twitter and Facebook, if that helps. I find that he tends to respond more directly via the former.

#79 Anna N

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Posted 08 June 2014 - 05:40 PM

He's on Twitter and Facebook, if that helps. I find that he tends to respond more directly via the former.


Thanks. Unfortunately I am hugely not. I have a lot of respect for David and it bothers me that this book does not seem to be up to his usual standards.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#80 fvandrog

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 11:15 PM

I got my copy last week, and have been thoroughly enjoying myself reading through it without cooking anything from the book until yesterday. I did buy some eggplant this weekend for another dish which, for reasons I don't actually remember, did not materialize. When I noticed the recipe for baba banoush, a quick dash to the fridge confirmed we had some tahini left, which was made a couple of weeks ago.

I followed Lebovitz recipe for baba banoush, leaving out the garlic which was served in ultra thin slices with the dish, so that the kids could leave it out if they desired to do so. We were generally enthusiast, but did think it turned out a tad salty. It is definitely a dish that will return to our table as it is fairly straightforward to make and enjoyed by all, but I'll tune down on the salt next time.
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#81 Mottmott

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 10:07 AM

I have at least 3  8" high bookcases full of cookbooks, so before I add one, I'd like to be sure it will deserve its space. 

 

Now that you've been cooking from this one for awhile, will it do it? 

 

I'm particularly interested in the response of those who consider themselves experienced cooks.

 

 

 


"Half of cooking is thinking about cooking." ---Michael Roberts

#82 Anna N

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 03:00 PM

One never likes to pan a book especially by someone like David Lebovitz but this one had too many issues for me to endorse it. YMMV.
Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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#83 Honkman

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Posted 26 June 2014 - 03:15 PM

I have at least 3  8" high bookcases full of cookbooks, so before I add one, I'd like to be sure it will deserve its space. 

 

Now that you've been cooking from this one for awhile, will it do it? 

 

I'm particularly interested in the response of those who consider themselves experienced cooks.

 

 

You might also want to look at Chowhound where the book is currently cookbook of the months and many experienced cooks cooking recipes and write about it (overall seems to be good feedback on the book)

 

http://chowhound.cho...m/topics/977518


Edited by Honkman, 26 June 2014 - 03:15 PM.


#84 LindaK

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Posted 27 June 2014 - 05:00 AM

I have at least 3  8" high bookcases full of cookbooks, so before I add one, I'd like to be sure it will deserve its space. 

 

Now that you've been cooking from this one for awhile, will it do it? 

 

I'm particularly interested in the response of those who consider themselves experienced cooks.

 

You might also want to look at Chowhound where the book is currently cookbook of the months and many experienced cooks cooking recipes and write about it (overall seems to be good feedback on the book)

 

http://chowhound.cho...m/topics/977518

 

After having read through this book and making a few more recipes, I’d give it a qualified recommendation.  The primary attraction, for me, is the writing.  David’s a terrific writer and his tales and descriptions of shopping, cooking, and eating in Paris are a joy to read.  It brings back a lot of memories for me.

 

Recipes are another matter.  Most of the recipes here are standards that you’ll find in other general French cookbooks, others are more original. Nothing wrong with that.  But the editing is poor, which has been noted here before.  And it happened again last night. I followed David’s recipe for celery root purée, which calls for cooking a potato that never gets used.  If you’re comfortable “fixing” recipes on your own, you can get past things like this, no big deal. But if I was making something unfamiliar, I'd probably check the recipe against another version. Easy for me to say, I have a couple of dozen French cookbooks on my shelves.

 

I took a look through the Chowhound discussions in the link above and there are mentions of grammatical errors in the use of French words and terms, but that’s a different editing problem.



 


#85 SobaAddict70

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Posted 07 July 2014 - 09:10 AM

I have at least 3  8" high bookcases full of cookbooks, so before I add one, I'd like to be sure it will deserve its space. 
 
Now that you've been cooking from this one for awhile, will it do it? 
 
I'm particularly interested in the response of those who consider themselves experienced cooks.



I haven't experienced any of the problems that some folks have, but that could be because I hadn't cooked the recipes they attempted. That being said, some of the proportions of the ingredients seem off (e.g.: the bacon in the mustard chicken, and also in the leeks.)

I love the book: the photography, the writing and from what dishes I've attempted, I would say it's worth a look or two, keeping in mind what has been mentioned previously.

Edited by SobaAddict70, 07 July 2014 - 09:14 AM.


#86 LindaK

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Posted 08 July 2014 - 03:32 PM

So I finally made the caillettes again, this time not cooking the pork/liver mixture before baking them.  To properly test David's recipe, I otherwise followed the recipe (except for leaving out the lemon juice, I didn't have a lemon handy). Results: delicious.

 

I baked them for the 30 minutes as instructed, which yielded an internal temp of 165F, which I figured was sufficient to cook the liver (I would like to know if that's true), Then I let them sit for ~10 minutes before serving them with a salad.  They really were like mini pates, rustic in style, very well seasoned and moist, not at all overcooked.  Good leftover the next day when brought to room temperature.  The only suggested I would add to David's would be to serve them with a good baguette, mustard, and cornichons. Like any country-style pate, it calls out for them.

 

I made the caillettes smaller than David did, but they are rich so smaller was plenty for me.  These would be nice for a buffet or dinner party.

 

DSCF1541-001.JPG


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#87 LindaK

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Posted 23 July 2014 - 05:47 AM

Last night’s dinner: Counterfeit duck confit.

 

DSCF1565.JPG

 

It’s very good and almost effortless.  You do need to plan in advance, though. The duck legs need to marinate overnight in their spice rub, and the cooking time is long so that it can be done at low temperature—which lets the fat render without burning and keeps the meat from becoming stringy. 

 

I omitted the gin from the marinade because I loathe the flavor, and the spice rub is pretty flexible so you could tweak it to suit your own tastes.  The important thing is to follow David’s directions for packing the duck legs close together in the pan, it keeps them partially submerged in the flavorful fat as they cook.

 

The meat doesn’t have the velvety texture of long-preserved confit but it wouldn’t be fair to expect it. It does deliver the flavor and crispy skin of a good confit, which is pretty awesome for all of 10 minutes of active prep work.

 

 

 



 


#88 LindaK

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 03:54 AM

Duck fat cookies

 

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A bonus of buying duck for the counterfeit confit and the duck terrine with figs (now ripening in the refrigerator) was a cup of rendered duck fat as well as a carcass for stock. I figured I’d try these cookies.

 

Wow. These are so delicious, but so very rich.  They’re sablés, French sugar cookies, with duck fat subbing for most of the butter.  They fall squarely in the savory cookie category that was made popular by Pierre Hermé, so they’re more for drink nibbles than dessert.  There are lots of variations on the theme—see Dorie Greenspan’s Around My French Table for seaweed (for which she credits David) and olive.  But the duck fat adds a whole new dimension.  It’s subtle but unmistakable.  I made mine with chopped dried cherries, plumped in brandy.  The flavors all come together beautifully. I can see playing around with this, maybe even adding some finely chopped duck cracklings.

 

I found the cookie dough to be a bit dry, so would add a little more fat next time.  If you have some extra duck fat on hand, give these a try.

 


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#89 SobaAddict70

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Posted 25 July 2014 - 12:12 PM

Oh wow, that is hardcore. You've definitely piqued my interest.

#90 LindaK

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Posted 29 July 2014 - 07:07 AM

Soba, go for it.

 

Another duck installment:  Duck Terrine with Figs

 

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Rustic patés like this are very simple to make, so kudos to David for encouraging home cooks to give one a try. This one is a mixture of duck, pork, and chicken livers.  It’s a nice blend, well flavored, and the addition of figs (or another dried fruit) add a sweet note.

 

I made this for an important family gathering, so was more concerned with excellent results than with perfect recipe testing.  For the most part I followed the recipe as written, with only a couple of tweaks—part personal taste, part recipe correction.

 

Personal taste: the recipe calls for adding chopped cornichons and their liquid to the mixture.  I prefer to offer the cornichons on the side, so didn’t include them.  Plus I added ½ tsp of curing salt to the final mixture, since I prefer my patés to retain some of their pink color.

 

Recipe concern: there’s an awful lot of liquid in this recipe:  ½ cup of brandy, ¼ cup of cornichon pickling juice, 2 eggs.  There isn’t any panade or binder to soak it up.  It looked like a lot to me.  Plus you puree the chicken livers, so they’re more fluid than solid.  So I proceeded with caution, first omitting the cornichon juice, then holding off adding the second egg.

 

Even so, the finished mixture was extremely loose. It certainly didn’t hold together.  Had I added the juice and another egg, it would have been almost pourable. Though the terrine is baked in a loaf/terrine pan and weighed down afterwards (and so extra liquid and fat would be pressed out), I was still worried.  I ended up adding extra ground pork to increase the solids and omitted the second egg entirely. 

 

Since my experience making patés is limited, it would be helpful to hear from someone more knowledgeable on this point.  After consulting similar recipes in other French cookbooks, I concluded that in the future I’d reduce the brandy before adding it (or just use less). You want the flavor, not the liquid. And I would continue to leave out the cornichon juice.

 

The finished terrine was excellent, though the extra pork made the duck less dominant than it would have been otherwise.  All in all, a good basic recipe.  Everyone loved it, even folks who swore they hated liver.  A crowd of 30 finished half of the terrine, which is good sized. 

 

Luckily I got to take the leftovers home.  The slice above, accompanied by another of sliced garden tomatoes with basil and vinaigrette, made a very welcome supper for yesterday's hot, humid evening.  Since the terrine benefits from sitting in the fridge for a few days, this is a great option for entertaining without last minute preparations.

 

 

 



 






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