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Cooking from "My Paris Kitchen"

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#31 djyee100

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Posted 14 April 2014 - 06:48 PM

I was shopping yesterday and noticed a flyer about David Lebovitz's appearance here to promote his new book. David Lebovitz is on book tour in the US and Canada (so far, only Vancouver) in April and May. He'll be in NYC May 13-14. His full schedule is here:
http://www.davidlebovitz.com/schedule/
 



#32 SobaAddict70

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 05:50 AM

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Oeufs mayo.

David calls for tomato in the salad, but I subbed French breakfast radishes instead; while greenhouse tomatoes *are* available at USGM, I didn't have those on hand.
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#33 Dejah

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 07:39 AM

Anna: I am so pleased to see you made the naan from this book. The results look delicious.

 

Did the cheese add anything to the texture, or was it mainly the taste factor?

 

It will be Big Easy naan experiment again soon...I need the temperature to be above freezing to stand outside for long periods of time...


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#34 Anna N

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 07:43 AM

Anna: I am so pleased to see you made the naan from this book. The results look delicious.
 
Did the cheese add anything to the texture, or was it mainly the taste factor?
 
It will be Big Easy naan experiment again soon...I need the temperature to be above freezing to stand outside for long periods of time...


Being a fan of naan I can only say that the cheese added nada, nothing. It is obviously an acquired taste. Do try the non-cheese recipe if you get a chance.
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#35 SobaAddict70

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 08:39 AM

I'll be attempting the leeks tonight, but I'm going to downsize the recipe so that it serves one person.

Stay tuned...

#36 Anna N

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 01:02 PM

Grated carrot salad

There isn't much one can do with a recipe for a grated carrot salad. First of all there's no point in following it like a chemical formula. So much depends on the carrots. Mine were a sad looking lot.

I do not have a fancy grater as is apparently available in Paris. And the grating disk on my small food processor is too fine so I used the equivalent of a box grater.

My remaining parsley was in even worse shape than my carrots and I was only able to salvage a few leaves.

Poncy plating couldn't hide all its defects.

image.jpg

The shortfalls here are all mine not the recipe's. If I can source some better carrots and some fresh parsley I might try this again. Although to be honest a grated carrot salad is probably not going to blow me away.

Edited to reposition photo and add:

Before I can make any more recipes from this book I need to replenish my supplies. I have been promised a trip to Whole Paycheck tomorrow.

Edited by Anna N, 15 April 2014 - 01:07 PM.

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#37 fvandrog

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Posted 15 April 2014 - 11:42 PM

Although to be honest a grated carrot salad is probably not going to blow me away.
 

 

It is the single most favorite dish of my youngest son (I guess we could have it a lot worse).

 

I am not sure though if a new recipe for carrot salad is a good enough excuse to get Lebovitz book though  :wink:


Edited by fvandrog, 15 April 2014 - 11:47 PM.


#38 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 12:00 AM

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6 leeks, after about 30 minutes of steaming.


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Mustard-bacon vinaigrette.

The amount of bacon here is about 3 rashers worth, chopped into not-quite pea size lardons, but close enough. The ratio of bacon to mustard is probably off by a little lot, but that's okay; I need only satisfy myself. David's recipe (page 88) calls for 2 cups, but that serves approx. 4-6 people. I was fine with the reduced amount.


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Poireaux vinaigrette à la moutarde et aux lardons ("leeks with mustard-bacon vinaigrette").


Tomorrow night I have dinner at a Filipino restaurant in NYC with friends, then the parade of cooking continues on Thursday.

Bonne nuit.

#39 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 12:20 AM

I thought I'd resort to cooking the leeks in barely simmering water, but then realized that I do have a steamer -- a stockpot-sized one that I hardly ever bother with. Not any more.

#40 SylviaLovegren

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 06:23 AM

13889153184_f9d2499fa4_z.jpg

6 leeks, after about 30 minutes of steaming.


13888821553_55b253ea63_z.jpg

Mustard-bacon vinaigrette.

The amount of bacon here is about 3 rashers worth, chopped into not-quite pea size lardons, but close enough. The ratio of bacon to mustard is probably off by a little lot, but that's okay; I need only satisfy myself. David's recipe (page 88) calls for 2 cups, but that serves approx. 4-6 people. I was fine with the reduced amount.


13888675375_ce15319377_z.jpg

Poireaux vinaigrette à la moutarde et aux lardons ("leeks with mustard-bacon vinaigrette").


Tomorrow night I have dinner at a Filipino restaurant in NYC with friends, then the parade of cooking continues on Thursday.

Bonne nuit.

 

Yes, but how'd it taste?



#41 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 06:38 AM

Is there a reason for cooking the leeks root-on, that you know of? Is this what everybody does but me?



#42 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:04 AM

Yes, but how'd it taste?


Was quite nice.

If I made this again, I'd cut back on the bacon even more so I could accentuate the leeks. They're luscious when steamed. I hadn't thought of that before.

#43 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:05 AM

Is there a reason for cooking the leeks root-on, that you know of? Is this what everybody does but me?


No particular reason.

The recipe isn't that specific but it also doesn't take much time to trim it before service.

#44 Anna N

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:26 AM

Was quite nice.If I made this again, I'd cut back on the bacon even more so I could accentuate the leeks. They're luscious when steamed. I hadn't thought of that before.


Interesting. Serious Eats also thought there was a bit too much bacon whenthey tested the recipe.
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#45 SobaAddict70

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 08:45 AM

2 cups of bacon lardons is probably an entire package of bacon. If I were younger and possessed of a hardier constitution, I might think that it wasn't a big deal, but these days I use meat more as a flavoring than as a main event if that makes any sense.

That being said, Thursday I'm hoping to pick up a bone-in lamb shoulder for the roast lamb dish. Looking forward to that.

#46 MikeHartnett

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Posted 16 April 2014 - 03:27 PM

I made the leeks and cut the bacon significantly, too. I used 2 medium-thick slices for the vinaigrette and 1 for crumbling on top. I didn't miss the extra.
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#47 SobaAddict70

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 06:33 AM

Today I'm going to pick up a bone-in lamb shoulder from either Eataly or Chelsea Market and start the prep for the roast lamb dish (page 203). You stuff it with anchovy and garlic; it marinates for a few hours or preferably overnight.

I'm going to skip making the panisses ("chickpea puffs") and the salsa verde. Instead, I'll substitute chermoula (still in keeping with the French theme, although it's by way of North Africa). You'll see photos for that later.

#48 Pallee

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 09:04 AM

IMG_1782.jpg I made the Chicken with Mustard, Butternut Squash Crumble, and the Green Beans with Snail Butter last night. I followed the recipes but did garnish the beans with chopped almonds. We liked the chicken, the skin does tend to stick a bit to the pan, so wait a good long time to turn it and use a strong metal spatula. I was concerned about the uncooked cornmeal in the squash dish, and the topping was more grainy than I like. Next time I'll either use cornbread crumbs or crumble cooked polenta in place of the cornmeal. 


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#49 SobaAddict70

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Posted 17 April 2014 - 10:00 AM

Looks awesome.

#50 SobaAddict70

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:29 AM

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Boneless lamb shoulder.

I wasn't able to get bone-in lamb shoulder, but I imagine that's not going to be a huge issue. This was stuffed with slivers of heirloom garlic and oil-packed anchovy fillets, then rubbed with sea salt and black pepper. It sat in the fridge overnight and will be roasted later today.

This is 3 lbs., about $38 worth from Eataly.


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1 tablespoon black cumin seeds and 1 tablespoon coriander seeds, toasted in a dry pan over high heat until fragrant...

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...then ground in a mortar and pestle or spice grinder until it's a coarsely-textured powder.

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Each time I make chermoula, I almost always vary the green ingredients a little bit. There is not one recipe for this sauce, so feel free to come up with your own combinations. Clockwise from right: heirloom garlic, scallions, mint, arugula, cilantro.

Combine garlic, scallions, mint, arugula and cilantro in a food processor or blender, along with a pinch of sea salt and a pinch of cayenne pepper (or minced fresh or dried chiles; how much depends on how spicy you want your sauce). Other ideas include but are not limited to: preserved lemon, preserved orange.

Pulse until you have a rough-textured purée. Transfer the purée to a bowl, then pour in about 1/2 cup olive oil and add the cumin powder. Mix well.

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Chermoula.

This is best the day it's made; its potency will diminish over time.

Along with the lamb, you can use it for just about anything imaginable -- with roast beef sandwiches, over pasta, stirred in scrambled eggs like so:

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Creamy scrambled eggs, with French breakfast radishes and chermoula.

To be continued...
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#51 gfweb

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 06:33 AM

attachicon.gifIMG_1782.jpgI made the Chicken with Mustard, Butternut Squash Crumble, and the Green Beans with Snail Butter last night. I followed the recipes but did garnish the beans with chopped almonds. We liked the chicken, the skin does tend to stick a bit to the pan, so wait a good long time to turn it and use a strong metal spatula. I was concerned about the uncooked cornmeal in the squash dish, and the topping was more grainy than I like. Next time I'll either use cornbread crumbs or crumble cooked polenta in place of the cornmeal. 

Tell me more about the butternut squash crumble please.



#52 Pallee

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 07:11 PM

Tell me more about the butternut squash crumble please.

Like I said, the topping was quite grainy, almost gritty because of the raw cornmeal. I also wonder about the cooking time on the squash itself. By the time I sautéed it, it was pretty much cooked, then you bake it covered for half an hour, steaming it. Then put the topping on and bake it some more. If the squash was as cooked as mine was after the sauté, I'd just top it and bake it uncovered. And used cornbread crumbs instead of raw cornmeal. 

I took the leftovers and turned them into a soup. Added water, cooked out the cornmeal, hit it with a touch of cream - was delicious.


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#53 SobaAddict70

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Posted 18 April 2014 - 11:16 PM

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Roast lamb, braised vegetables, chermoula.

#54 Anna N

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:01 AM

.........
Roast lamb, braised vegetables, chermoula.


How was the lamb? Are you being diplomatic in not mentioning the taste of the final dish?
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#55 SobaAddict70

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:29 AM

How was the lamb? Are you being diplomatic in not mentioning the taste of the final dish?


Oh, it was absolutely divine.

I only wish I'd had bone-in lamb as opposed to boneless lamb shoulder.

It exceeded my expectations in just about every way and the aroma while it was roasting in the oven should be bottled and sold. I'd make a mint off of that alone. :)

Chermoula is a nice twist on the usual lamb with mint sauce.

The vegetables in the pic above differ from David's recipe. My version contains: carrots, heirloom potatoes (Russian Banana specifically), peas, Jerusalem artichokes, salsify and shallots. It's a great way to clean out the vegetable crisper and use anything you've got lying around.

#56 Anna N

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 06:41 AM

I tackled three recipes yesterday.


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The green beans with snail butter. Green beans are steamed until tender then briefly sauteed with butter, garlic, parsley and finished with salt, pepper and lemon juice. What's not to like? I had no issues with this recipe. It's an interesting take on "snail butter" but it won't push my tiny mushrooms in snail butter aside.

Caramel pork ribs

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I had my heart set on some tasty pork ribs and these left me wanting. The ingedients seem to offer possibilities (beer, bourbon, cider vinegar, ketchup, ginger etc.) but nothing really came together. The recipe was easy to follow but again, I find 350 F a high temp for what is essentially a braise. Still this time I went for it. Ribs should have been meltingly tender in my view but they were on the dry side. I so want to like this book but yesterday was a loss.

The third thing I made was the pissaladiere.

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The challenge here was in stretching the dough to cover a half-sheet pan. Eventually I had to resort to a rolling pin. I hope others give this recipe a try and report on it. This was my first pissaladiere so I have nothing to compare it to. I bought high quality (or at least high-priced) anchovies at Whole Foods but the bottom line is that these are nasty, smelly little fish that I just don't like! Stripped of the anchovies the tart was quite pleasant. But then it was no longer what David intended. Sorry David.
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#57 chefmd

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Posted 19 April 2014 - 04:29 PM

I do not have the book.  Placed a hold on it at the library, want to look at it prior to buying it.  Meanwhile I looked up his blog and made salad nicoise.  I am sorry to say that my previous versions of this dish included grilled tuna and cooked items such as potatoes.  According to David, all veggies are fresh, canned tuna or anchovies are OK but not at the same time.  

 

New version was so much better and fresher, made with tomatoes, fava beans, cucumbers, olives, scallions, parsley and simply dressed with olive oil.  Here it is and the old version for comparison.

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#58 SobaAddict70

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 10:10 PM

I've got a lot of leftovers this week, so it'll be a while before I make anything new from the book.

Tomorrow's menu and Tuesday's are going to be decidedly NOT LAMB, however.

My boyfriend arrives in town next week and will be staying with me for quite a while. He's a Francophile, so I have a few ideas in store such as the sardine rillettes, the aioli plate, salade lyonnaise and soupe au pistou (but with ramps subbing in for the basil). In the meantime, I'm hoping some folks will take a stab at the book and post. I'm looking forward to reading more. :)

#59 Smithy

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Posted 20 April 2014 - 10:33 PM

Ramps for basil.  That's quite a switch in flavor profiles, isn't it?  I'll try it sometime if I ever lay my hands on ramps at the right time.

 

This topic is great fun!  I look forward to reading more, and savoring the recipes from afar.  

 

Afar, I said.

 

I. Do. Not. Need. To Buy. Another. Cookbook.  

Yet.   :laugh:


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#60 SobaAddict70

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Posted 21 April 2014 - 08:05 AM

Basil is available at my supermarkets, like out-of-season tomatoes, but I prefer to limit myself to seasonal ingredients from my farmers' market. I view that as more of a "summer" herb, and so act accordingly. Your mileage may vary.

For the pistou, the ramps would be subbed for the basil and I'd omit the garlic. *shrug*
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